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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
No1: Gent's silver watch with fusee movement. 82142 on movement and case
Weight 5.5oz gross
Dia. of case 2 1/8"
Hallmark for London 1872
Case made by Edward Wigan
Unfortunately one of the hands is missing
I will add another watch tomorrow at 2000hr GMT

Any additional information or advice would be much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No2 Ladies 18ct. Pocket Watch unsigned movement. No makers mark or date letter on case.
Weight 1.4 oz Dia.~1 5/8"
Is there a generic name for this type of movement?
 

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Yes.."collectors name" is lepine IV with clinder escapement and 6 rubies. Depending n the straight form of the cocks/bridge is not a very early one of this contruktion type. A good overview you found here Mikrolisk - The horological trade mark index but this form was used a long time paralell to the lepine V until the end of the 20 century. Depending on the absence of french or probably swiss hallmarks its most likely made before 1882.
A really wonderful case and a nice two tone email dial well presented.

Thank you again for the nice pictures
Silke
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
No3 Another ladies watch, this time in a Fine Silver* case. Perhaps the most plain that I have but the one in the best condition, apart from the hairline cracks on the dial. Again no hall marks or date letter.
Keyless winding and perhaps newer than the rest.
Weight 2oz
Size Dia.~ 1 5/8"

*99.9% Ag
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
No4 My grandfather's gold pocket watch.
18ct gold case hallmarked for London 1864. Maker looks like RB but I cannot find this maker in my book of marks.
Weight: 4.5 oz
Size: dia. 2"
Fusee movement signed J R & W Laing 53 & 55 Brunswick st. Glasgow. 2288
Amazingly this firm still trades in watches but at a different Glasgow address. ( J R & W = James, Robert & William )
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I wonder if anyone can tell me why some of the screws in the balance wheel are cut square while most are pointed?
This can be clearly seen in photo 3 watch No4
 

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I wonder if anyone can tell me why some of the screws in the balance wheel are cut square while most are pointed?
This can be clearly seen in photo 3 watch No4
At a guess i would say the difference between the square ones and the pointy ones is that only one type have threads,so that they can be screwed in or out to adjust microsecond differences in the swing of the balance.
 

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I would guess that, over the years, different watchmakers regulated the watch and some took some screws out (or moved them), others put different ones back so that the watch accumulated different types of screws in its history.

Hartmut Richter
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Careful examination shows that both types have slotted heads so all are screwed in. The square ones will be heavier so perhaps this was a way of increasing the weight at the required part the balance wheel. Before when I had looked at these watches a had supposed that this could be adjusted by unscrewing one or more of the screws slightly but all of these screws are in as far as they will go. However adding weight inside the balance wheel (cylinder heavier than a cone) will have little effect in the horizontal axis but will have an effect in the vertical axis depending on the position of the watch. Normally in a gentleman's waistcoat pocked it would be in a vertical position but probably kept in a horizontal position at night.
As has been said many times before watch regulation is hellishly complicated.
 
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