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Well good fun and thanks for your comments😂. However I was serious. The watchmaker(Omega Certified) who serviced my watch recently mentioned only two things to me, "a) Do not swim wearing the watch and b) Do not expose the watch to prolonged heat or cold. If either of these two things happened, bring the watch to get the seal checked.". And hence I was asking, wasn't sure what qualifies for prolonged heat. However guess I know it now. ;)
You should understand that no watch ever has drown by not putting it near water, nor it did ever malfunction by not exposing it to extreme temperatures so your watchmaker risks nothing by recommending wrapping your watch up in cotton wool.

On the other hand, making explicit the link other member shared, an Speedmaster, very much like yours, was exposed (and did survived) to:
  1. High Temperature – 48 hours at a temperature of 160°F (71°C) followed by 30 minutes at 200°F (93°C). For the high temperature tests, atmospheric pressure shall be 5.5 psi (0.35 atm) and the relative humidity shall not exceed 15%. <- NOTE: this is far more extreme than what your laptop did.
  2. Low Temperature – Four hours at a temperature of 0°F (-18° C)
  3. Temperature Pressure Chamber – pressure maximum of 1.47 x 10exp-5 psi (10exp-6 atm) with temperature raised to 160°F (71°C). The temperature shall then be lowered to 0°F (-18°C) in 45 minutes and raised again to 160°F in 45 minutes. Fifteen more such cycles shall be completed.
  4. Relative Humidity – A total time of 240 hours at temperatures varying between 68°F and 160°F (20°C and 71°C, respectively) in a relative humidity of at least 95%. The steam used shall have a pH value between 6.5 and 7.5. <- NOTE: this is what you will find on a hot sauna you'd stay into... for ten days!
  5. Pure Oxygen Atmosphere – The test item shall be placed in an atmosphere of 100% oxygen at a pressure of 5.5 psi (0.35 atm) for 48 hours. Performance outside of specification tolerance, visible burning, creation of toxic gases, obnoxious odors, or deterioration of seals or lubricants shall constitute a failure. The ambient temperature shall be maintained at 160°F (71°C).
  6. Shock – Six shocks of 40g each, in six different directions, with each shock lasting 11 milliseconds.
  7. Acceleration – The test item shall be accelerated linearly from 1g to 7.25g within 333 seconds, along an axis parallel to the longitudinal spacecraft axis.
  8. Decompression – 90 minutes in a vacuum of 1.47 x 10E-5 psi (10 E-6 atm) at a temperature of 160° F (71° C), and 30 minutes at a 200° F (93°C).
  9. High Pressure – The test item shall be subjected to a pressure of 23.5 psi (1.6 atm) for a minimum period of one hour. <- NOTE: This is equivalent to be submerged into 16 meters of sea water.
  10. Vibration – Three cycles of 30 minutes (lateral, horizontal, vertical, the frequency varying from 5 to 2000 cps and back to 5 cps in 15 minutes. Average acceleration per impulse must be at least 8.8g.
  11. Acoustic Noise – 130dB over a frequency range from 40 to 10,000 HZ, for a duration of 30 minutes.
Note that, as per the same previous link, while the Speedmaster survived the above regime, it was not unscathered: "It gained 21 minutes during the Decompression Test and lost 15 minutes during the Acceleration Test. The luminescence on the dial was destroyed during testing. At the conclusion of all testing the Omega chronograph operated satisfactorily."

Also note that, as per NASA requirements, while the watch to be certified should survive the (quite extreme) regime above, it was neither expected nor required to survive in perfect conditions forever: as long as it survived through its ~ one week mission it could fully disintegrate just a second after landing back to Earth and it still would be a success; you possibly want for your watch to last longer than a week, right?

Now it's up to you to decide what your watch can or shouldn't be exposed to.
 

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I accidently left my speedmaster by the side of my laptop exhaust where it was blowing hot air from. It was almost 20 mins before I returned to my desk. When I picked up the watch again for wearing it was pretty much very warm. I have checked the timekeeping for last 2 hours, it is fine. Do I need to take it to the service center for getting the seal checked ?? It was serviced just 3 and a half months ago.
Listen... you’ll have changed it’s molecular structure. This is so very dangerous, so bleak. So very grim.

Everybody knows that anything left next to a computer for any period of time is just evaporated by the power of those fans.

In fact.

Put the watch in a vacuum sealable bag, put that bag in a a box, then three more boxes. Then take it to NASA.

They will want to know about this... in fact, they know I read about it and they’re calling me.

What shall I tell them you’re doing?
 
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If you are wearing it while scrolling through WUS then it is being exposed to a lethal amount of hot air and I’ve no doubt it’s hymen has done snapped and those gaskets gots to go! Medic!!!!
 

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This is literally where my Speedmaster (a triple date so not even capable of space travel - except on the shuttle) sits when it is not being worn. At several hours a day. When it's not there a 1970 Rolex Oysterdate is sitting in its place.
 

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First of all, I don't think there's any lasting damage. The only thing I'd be concerned about is if it has a Hesalite crystal. Hesalite is an acrylic plastic. It melts at 320 deg F. It begins to soften around 210 deg F, which is near the boing point of water. I rather doubt the exhaust from the cooling fan on your laptop is that hot, since it has to be designed so it's not harmful to humans - and the plastic case also has to withstand those temps.
 

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I accidently left my speedmaster by the side of my laptop exhaust where it was blowing hot air from. It was almost 20 mins before I returned to my desk. When I picked up the watch again for wearing it was pretty much very warm. I have checked the timekeeping for last 2 hours, it is fine. Do I need to take it to the service center for getting the seal checked ?? It was serviced just 3 and a half months ago.
We are only 11 days into 2021, and we already may have the dumbest post of the year.
 

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I hope the OP's not getting upset at us poking fun, although it is bloody hilarious.
My old man always gave me this advice "Engage brain before opening mouth"
But dont worry I still forget sometimes 🙄
 

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Yes but you do know they returned, right? I’m guessing it got more than a little toasty during reentry.
Fair point :LOL:

Not sure they'd need a watch after re-entry, though, and NASA didn't worry about resale value too much!

M
 

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I live in Florida. It gets hot air 24/7 lol. Think about all the watch fanatics in the Middle East. 120 degrees all day. You’re fine.
 

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Yes but you do know they returned, right? I’m guessing it got more than a little toasty during reentry.
Fair point

Not sure they'd need a watch after re-entry, though, and NASA didn't worry about resale value too much!

M
If it's hot enough to harm the watch on the astronauts' wrist, the astronauts themselves...
 

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yep, it's worthless now. Give it to me for scrap.
 

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find out what watches Politicians wear. Those are definitely suitable for hot air exposure.
 
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