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I scratched my new Protrek the other day and I was GLAD because it meant I can finally enjoy it a bit more like how it was intended. I don't have to the feeling to baby it anymore. Magnets, fall damage, scratches sure...but what amounts to warm breath for 20 minutes is fine.
 

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I worked for extended periods of time in the Arabian Gulf in the summer, where the temperature outside regularly exceeded 110 F. Even chose to take some hikes when I had time off. Like walking around in a furnace. Car door handles get so hot they can burn your skin. Somehow, my cheap, humble Seiko automatic performed without a hitch, even as the high heat disabled my smart phone (had to shut it off to avoid overheating the components).

Your watch should be fine.
 

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Well good fun and thanks for your comments😂. However I was serious. The watchmaker(Omega Certified) who serviced my watch recently mentioned only two things to me, "a) Do not swim wearing the watch and b) Do not expose the watch to prolonged heat or cold. If either of these two things happened, bring the watch to get the seal checked.". And hence I was asking, wasn't sure what qualifies for prolonged heat. However guess I know it now. ;)
Your warchmaker gives you advice contrary to the manufacturer's official specifications. How trustworthy do you think he is?

15644883
 

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You should understand that no watch ever has drown by not putting it near water, nor it did ever malfunction by not exposing it to extreme temperatures so your watchmaker risks nothing by recommending wrapping your watch up in cotton wool.

On the other hand, making explicit the link other member shared, an Speedmaster, very much like yours, was exposed (and did survived) to:
  1. High Temperature – 48 hours at a temperature of 160°F (71°C) followed by 30 minutes at 200°F (93°C). For the high temperature tests, atmospheric pressure shall be 5.5 psi (0.35 atm) and the relative humidity shall not exceed 15%. <- NOTE: this is far more extreme than what your laptop did.
  2. Low Temperature – Four hours at a temperature of 0°F (-18° C)
  3. Temperature Pressure Chamber – pressure maximum of 1.47 x 10exp-5 psi (10exp-6 atm) with temperature raised to 160°F (71°C). The temperature shall then be lowered to 0°F (-18°C) in 45 minutes and raised again to 160°F in 45 minutes. Fifteen more such cycles shall be completed.
  4. Relative Humidity – A total time of 240 hours at temperatures varying between 68°F and 160°F (20°C and 71°C, respectively) in a relative humidity of at least 95%. The steam used shall have a pH value between 6.5 and 7.5. <- NOTE: this is what you will find on a hot sauna you'd stay into... for ten days!
  5. Pure Oxygen Atmosphere – The test item shall be placed in an atmosphere of 100% oxygen at a pressure of 5.5 psi (0.35 atm) for 48 hours. Performance outside of specification tolerance, visible burning, creation of toxic gases, obnoxious odors, or deterioration of seals or lubricants shall constitute a failure. The ambient temperature shall be maintained at 160°F (71°C).
  6. Shock – Six shocks of 40g each, in six different directions, with each shock lasting 11 milliseconds.
  7. Acceleration – The test item shall be accelerated linearly from 1g to 7.25g within 333 seconds, along an axis parallel to the longitudinal spacecraft axis.
  8. Decompression – 90 minutes in a vacuum of 1.47 x 10E-5 psi (10 E-6 atm) at a temperature of 160° F (71° C), and 30 minutes at a 200° F (93°C).
  9. High Pressure – The test item shall be subjected to a pressure of 23.5 psi (1.6 atm) for a minimum period of one hour. <- NOTE: This is equivalent to be submerged into 16 meters of sea water.
  10. Vibration – Three cycles of 30 minutes (lateral, horizontal, vertical, the frequency varying from 5 to 2000 cps and back to 5 cps in 15 minutes. Average acceleration per impulse must be at least 8.8g.
  11. Acoustic Noise – 130dB over a frequency range from 40 to 10,000 HZ, for a duration of 30 minutes.
Interestingly enough, they needed 11 different watch owners to perform those tests. Their sacrifice will be forever remembered... XD

Jokes aside, interesting ! There's been quite some communication about VSA's INOX 130 trials in 2016, but it's noteworthy to learn that even non beater watches can withstand a lot.
 

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Well good fun and thanks for your comments😂. However I was serious. The watchmaker(Omega Certified) who serviced my watch recently mentioned only two things to me, "a) Do not swim wearing the watch and b) Do not expose the watch to prolonged heat or cold. If either of these two things happened, bring the watch to get the seal checked.". And hence I was asking, wasn't sure what qualifies for prolonged heat. However guess I know it now. ;)
just want to say in response to your watchmaker who may need to be recertified.... its pretty cold up here...

15644968
 

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Blimey, I always thought it was cold in space! I stand totally corrected!

Although the moon isn't out during the day, so I suppose it's not a problem ;)

M
The way i understood it, it's a bit of both.
Hot when you're in direct sunlight and the only way to loose heat is with radiation, not convection like we have on earth, where the atmosphere can move quite a bit of energy away. But in shadow, you still radiate heat and there is no insulating layer of air, so it will get cold.
Also, pressure levels and density are tricky for temperatures, because those values don't really mean much without the energy available. For example, I don't mind putting my hand for a short time in a 180 degrees c oven (it will feel hot, but not too bad), but i won't put my hand in a bucket of water that's 75 degrees c.
 

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The way i understood it, it's a bit of both.
Hot when you're in direct sunlight and the only way to loose heat is with radiation, not convection like we have on earth, where the atmosphere can move quite a bit of energy away. But in shadow, you still radiate heat and there is no insulating layer of air, so it will get cold.
Also, pressure levels and density are tricky for temperatures, because those values don't really mean much without the energy available. For example, I don't mind putting my hand for a short time in a 180 degrees c oven (it will feel hot, but not too bad), but i won't put my hand in a bucket of water that's 75 degrees c.
Well that explains it then. Should have said that earlier.
 
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