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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This might be something for the watch repair section, but I think it is equally interesting for the vintage watch collector.

I have this wonderful TIMEX from the 1970s, LCD display with hours, minutes, seconds, day, date, year and a stop watch function. I bought it as NOS and it was always left in the box with batteries inserted, which I took out a while ago.

It has a movement inside made by Hughes Aircraft Co., the company of the crazy billionaire Howard Hughes, taking two (!) button cells.

I then saw that it had a chip and a few scratches in the mineral crystal from mishandling the watch (the rest is dust and dirt on the image). We all know how to easily take care of this with Polywatch when we are dealing with an acrylic crystal, but glass? It's the other way around here (filling and not sanding down to the level of the scratch) when coping with the problem.

Well, I tried the Polywatch glass version for the first time and - everything gone like it never existed.

Youtube has lots of videos if someone wants to know how it is done, unless you have already tried it.

15881527
 

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This might be something for the watch repair section, but I think it is equally interesting for the vintage watch collector.

I have this wonderful TIMEX from the 1970s, LCD display with hours, minutes, seconds, day, date, year and a stop watch function. I bought it as NOS and it was always left in the box with batteries inserted, which I took out a while ago.

It has a movement inside made by Hughes Aircraft Co., the company of the crazy billionaire Howard Hughes, taking two (!) button cells.

I then saw that it had a chip and a few scratches in the mineral crystal from mishandling the watch (the rest is dust and dirt on the image). We all know how to easily take care of this with Polywatch when we are dealing with an acrylic crystal, but glass? It's the other way around here (filling and not sanding down to the level of the scratch) when coping with the problem.

Well, I tried the Polywatch glass version for the first time and - everything gone like it never existed.

Youtube has lots of videos if someone wants to know how it is done, unless you have already tried it.

View attachment 15881527
Can you be more specific on what you used, and where you find it?

I searched Polywatch Glass on Amazon, and only found their Dimond abrasive polish for glass.

I would live to fill a deep scratch on my HP-01 right above the "TT" on "Hewlett"

15881863
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Can you be more specific on what you used, and where you find it?

I searched Polywatch Glass on Amazon, and only found their Dimond abrasive polish for glass.

I would live to fill a deep scratch on my HP-01 right above the "TT" on "Hewlett"

View attachment 15881863
I had recommended: 'Youtube has lots of videos if someone wants to know how it is done, unless you have already tried it.' I don't know about the crystal on your specific watch and the functioning of the buttons.




Amazon USA:


Of course Esslinger has it




Well, if you know how to do it and if you can handle everything correctly (like applying the right pressure etc.), it should to the job. This lady in the next video had failed at first, but with the help of a Dremel in addition ...

One should pay attention when applying the stuff. It comes out of the tube much to easy and half the tube is empty if you press to hard. Otherwise, you can use it many times, also on other watches.


Be very careful with the latter, but this is how professionals do it (not with a Dremel but with a bigger machine on a fixed stand, because you should really move the thing you are polishing and not the tool).


This is how I had done it in the past, but I was looking for an easier solution. I can't do this inside the house because the stuff (paste and dust) flies around everywhere.
 

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Thanks, that is what I saw. I was confused because you had said filling and not sanding. I can confirm that what you linked is a sanding abrasive Dimond compound. It will remove material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Sorry for the confusion, my mistake. It's the other way around, the regular Polywatch applied on an acrylic crystal is a process of sanding and filling

Quote

As mentioned, Polywatch has a light abrasive material that grinds down the surface of the plastic and thus creates a more even surface that grinds the surface to a polished and scratch-free finish. According to PolyWatch, when the plastic is ground off, it also ”melts” into the scratches to help remove the scratches. Lastly, the watch crystal polishing cream also contains some ingredients that dissolve the acrylic to some degree in order to help the crystal have its scratches removed.

Unquote
 
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