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Discussion Starter #1
I have an Edward Howard watch that was passed down to me but have had a hard time finding out exactly which model it is. Ive narrowed things down a little bit but have never been able to find a picture of one that looks like the pocket watch I have. I believe it's a series 5 and 19 jewel. It's a size 16 and an open face RR style. If anyone has a good amount of knowledge about this style watch that would be great and I can post pictures too.
 

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If you 'can' post pictures, I'm wondering why they haven't already been posted. It's not easy finding out things about a watch when we can't see it. A picture saying a thousand words isn't a cliche...
 

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Does the dial say "Edward Howard" fully spelled out? If so, that's a really good sign.

Please post pictures. I'm personally not overly knowledgeable of Keystone Howard products, but would still be glad to offer my opinion.
 

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If the original description matches the movement, it is indeed a Series 5. Oddly, the 19 jewel watch was made only in a Series 5, while other jewel count Howards (17, 21 & 23) have more than one series.

When I collected Keystone Howards, it seemed to me there were fewer 19J models out there, compared to each of the other models. Whether that is merely my perception or there are fewer 19J movements is hard to say.

The serial number on the paper is from around 1910. You have a great watch, and the box makes it desirable.

In case you're not familiar with Howards, your watch was made by the Keystone Watch Co., after E. Howard & Co. sold the name in 1902. While "Early Howards" are typically more desired than "Keystone Howards," yours is quite a good watch: railroad grade with the Montgomery dial (where each minute is marked).

It's been 20 years since I've collected pocket watches (nearly all Keystone Howards). But your watch sure brings back fond memories. Enjoy it in good health!
 

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Looks like you've already received a good answer from someone who knows what they're talking about.

I can only add one thing-please get rid of that yellow crystal!
 

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Don't save the yellowed crystal, the yellowing is indicative of the plastic deteriorating. If left on the watch fumes will cause rusting of the hands and movement. The original crystal would have been glass.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
so would you recommend that I have the crystal replaced or keep the original on there? Because I wouldn't want to depreciate the value by not having all the original parts on it. Also when I was looking around the closest style of Howard watch I found was one that was a California RR or something like that but I cannot find the link anymore. As you said its somewhat of a later one after the company was sold but how much do you think it's worth? The only issues is there is a small hairline crack in the case but everything else is fully functioning and great.
 

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As Ron says the current crystal is emitting gases which are rusting the more important original parts - if you leave it on you risk losing far more value than anything that a yellowed crystal might add. In any case crystals were normal service replacements so the chances are that this one isn't original in any case.
 

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I used a watch identification book by author Cooksie Shugart for an estimated date of production.

Sorry about the crystal advice. I was not aware the old plastic crystal would damage the watch.
 
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