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Anyone know the model # and approximate mfg year of the watch pictured......as well as approximate resell value? Also, if there are scratches on the black bezel, can those be refurbished (i.e. removed) by B&R/Sinn or a watch repair guy? Thanks!



 
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Anyone know the model # and approximate mfg year of the watch pictured......as well as approximate resell value? Also, if there are scratches on the black bezel, can those be refurbished (i.e. removed) by B&R/Sinn or a watch repair guy? Thanks!



Basicly it´s a Sinn 103 (see individual no. on the back) labeled for B & R. According to the bezel I´d say it´s one of the early 103 watches.
I don´t give an estimate and here´s why (shameless plug from our vintage watches forum):

(1) The absolutely most important factor in assigning value to a watch is condition. And unless the watch is in horrible shape, we simply cannot tell its condition from a photo. If it's really bad you don't need us to evaluate it anyway.
(2) Watches often have gold cases or diamonds on the dial which makes them more valuable as jewelry than as a timepiece. We are not gemologists or gold bugs so we can't help you there
(3) There are books out there which give a guideline as to prices but they assume the watch is serviced and in running condition. They are no help if a watch is broken or hasn't been cleaned in decades.
(4) Ultimately the price of any vintage watch is determined by what the buyer will pay. You have only to follow a few eBay auctions to see this truth in action.
The effect of each of the above reasons appears to be cumulative, and as a result even the best guess we could give you on value is going to be out by 50% or more. What good is that to you?
Our advice before asking us (or any website) about valuation is:
(1) Follow eBay auctions for similar pieces to yours, taking into account condition as the #1 factor.
(2) Go to a bricks and mortar facility who has a watchmaker you can trust and get that person's opinion.
(3) Read our (other) sticky "7 Rules (blah blah blah)" for more common sense info and details.
Best of all just enjoy your old stuff, don't worry about value. Likely your grandfather didn't anyway.
 
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