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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, recently i found this golden watch belonged to my grand grand father or grand grand grand father, anyway I have no experience it this matter and I am searching for more info about origin and some kind of evaluation. I searched the internet but didn't found a watch similar to
this one. Any help is appriciated.




 

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It looks like a pretty modern production pocket-watch. If I recall, non-magnetic watches didn't come in until the 1940s or something. My guess would be (and this is a guess and nothing else) that it's from the 50s at the earliest.

If you can get the caseback off (and I think this one just unscrews) and photograph the movement and the inside of the caseback, we may be able to tell you if the watch is solid gold or gold-filled and what quality of movement it has.

We don't give any evaluations here, sorry. It's not easy to evaluate watches based purely on photographs, which is why this site doesn't do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I managed to open it

It looks like a pretty modern production pocket-watch. If I recall, non-magnetic watches didn't come in until the 1940s or something. My guess would be (and this is a guess and nothing else) that it's from the 50s at the earliest.

If you can get the caseback off (and I think this one just unscrews) and photograph the movement and the inside of the caseback, we may be able to tell you if the watch is solid gold or gold-filled and what quality of movement it has.

We don't give any evaluations here, sorry. It's not easy to evaluate watches based purely on photographs, which is why this site doesn't do it.


Look what I found inside:





 

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Typical art-deco style watch.It was rather known brand in 1930s and 1940s.I'm proud owner of one rectangular art-deco "Election" wrist watch myself.

Regards!
 

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Re: I managed to open it

Neat...I've never seen a watch use a bridge for the balance. Wonder why they did that? Favre-Leuba used to do that on some of their watches.
 

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Re: I managed to open it

Neat...I've never seen a watch use a bridge for the balance. Wonder why they did that? Favre-Leuba used to do that on some of their watches.
Nowadays, they are quite common. Rolex seem to have started the trend - at least all of their movements have that now. Also Glashütte Original, Audemars Piguet, Omega Cal. 8500.....

But as far as I know, this is definitely a modern feature so it shows that the watch is probably post WWII.

Hartmut Richter
 

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Re: Bridge for balance

Some Seiko calibres had them in the 1960s eg Seiko Champion and Seiko Cronos manual winds.

And their automatic chronographs in the 1970s
Seiko 6138


Seiko 6139



I thought I had seen one on another brand too but now I can't find it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Re: I managed to open it

Nowadays, they are quite common. Rolex seem to have started the trend - at least all of their movements have that now. Also Glashütte Original, Audemars Piguet, Omega Cal. 8500.....

But as far as I know, this is definitely a modern feature so it shows that the watch is probably post WWII.

Hartmut Richter


Something I know for sure is that watch is made before 1945 .. My grand grand father died in 1945, the watch belonged to him or his father. Great condition of the watch is because it was well kept in treasure box in bank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you all of you guys, any idea how to find some detailed info or some method to determine watch's age? That's the only way for me to find who was the first owner.... And some other question .. what exactly means "rolled gold" ?
 

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Aaah that's much better!

Well I was slightly off in my dating. *Blushes*

Rolled gold means two sheets or layers of gold which have been welded onto a base-metal (brass, usually). It's not a solid gold case, but it should look just as nice.

Rolled gold & Gold-Filled cases usually had "Guaranteed" or "Warranted" on them, and a certain number of years (5, 10, 20, 25) to show how good the filling or rolling was, and how long the gold was expected to last for before wear would show through to the brass underneath.
 

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Rolled gold & Gold-Filled cases usually had "Guaranteed" or "Warranted" on them, and a certain number of years (5, 10, 20, 25) to show how good the filling or rolling was, and how long the gold was expected to last for before wear would show through to the brass underneath.
That only applies to American cases manufactured before January 1924. After that time it was not allowed according to a rule of the Federal Trade Commission.
 

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Yes I know...I admit that threw me off. I suppose that it was still allowed in other places, though? Such as in Europe? This case looks a bit more recent than 1924.
 

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Re: I managed to open it

Hi -

You'll find that most (but not all!) watches with a full bridge balance have such because of the free-sprung balance.

A free-sprung balance is, ceteris paribus, superior to the usual balance system, as there is no crimp in the balance spring, allowing the spring to "breath" or cycle with significantly more consistency than the normal balances. This is one of the features of some of the brands mentioned, especially Rolex and others.

Free-sprung balances have been around for quite a while, but the ability to get the balance springs down pat took quite a bit of experimentation to get it right. This is generally post-war, but not exclusively so.

JohnF
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thank you guys for the answers, any idea who will be able to evaluate the watch ? Some jeweller or ?
 

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Welcome! :)

Best to take the watch to a jeweller, an antiques dealer or a vintage & antique watchmaker. They ought to be able to give you an idea of its value.
 

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Re: I managed to open it

Hi -

You'll find that most (but not all!) watches with a full bridge balance have such because of the free-sprung balance.

A free-sprung balance is, ceteris paribus, superior to the usual balance system, as there is no crimp in the balance spring, allowing the spring to "breath" or cycle with significantly more consistency than the normal balances. This is one of the features of some of the brands mentioned, especially Rolex and others.

Free-sprung balances have been around for quite a while, but the ability to get the balance springs down pat took quite a bit of experimentation to get it right. This is generally post-war, but not exclusively so.

JohnF
I'm not familiar with the modern freesprung balance watches but the
'Golden Age' of the Freesprung balance has to be English watches
of the very best quality from the second half of the 19th C.
These freesprung watches were usualy adjusted to observatory
'chronometer' standard.

I can't see the conection you make between the freesprung balance and
a full bridge rather than a cock, none of the above watches pictured have
a freesprung balance and any old watches I've saw with a freesprung
balance had a cock rather than a bridge.
 
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