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Just received mine and after struggling with the pairing process a little - it’s my first connected watch - I’m loving it! I like the color more than I thought I would and as was said above, the band is super comfy.

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My first impressions:

Buying from Reeds was a good experience.

The cyan color is more subdued than I expected, and I like it.

The overall design language is very nice. If this is the new square aesthetic, I'm a fan.

This is the first watch I've ever had that naturally sits where I want it -- just behind the ulna bump, twisted slightly back to my face, and with the clasp and keeper positioned so they don't scratch/rub the desk below my keyboard.

The strap is very comfortable. My GLS-5600 zulu adapter fits, but I don't think that will be necessary. I do wish both ends had perforations -- breathability might drive me to a fabric strap after all.

The screen is nice, similar to a Kindle's contrast. Yet the contrast appears somewhat low to me because the bezel is shiny metal and the inner surround is dark. The smallest text is still easily legible to me at rest, but my eyes are pretty good in that respect.

This is my first Casio where the "P" indicator is prominent enough to be noticed when I'm not looking for it. Good job. That includes all modes I've seen it in, which is pervasive -- and having current time always shown is a surprisingly rare feature in a digital watch. Good job x2.

On the world time display, the airplane-mode icon is right next to the world time city. I think that's a beautiful bit of design.

I like the pushers. They're much easier to use than my GLS-5600. The GBX-100 has larger targets with wider lug spacing, so the buttons are easy to find and push. The pushers have ridges, so even short fingernails become useful rather than a liability (as I find them to be on flat and smooth pushers). Also, the gap between the lugs just above the pushers is perfect for getting leverage when pushing the opposite button.

There are only 13 preset ports. So, that's pretty much for demonstration purposes only.

My largest complaint so far: holding down the fwd/rev buttons does not quickly increment the selection. (Holding the down button will exit everything and return you to the main display, except in run mode where it only cancels the lap summary screen.) Also, manually setting latitude and longitude requires setting numbers by one-tenth increments. To select a longitude of west 122.7, I had to push the down button five hundred and seventy three (573) times. This is a pain. Especially because this watch doesn't accept quick, repeated input: it needs to update the display before it'll accept another press. FFS. Moreover, it suggests that either (a) Casio didn't test this watch by hand, or (b) somebody did test this and it was found to be acceptable. I'm troubled by that: what other nuggets of horror will I uncover?

Once I set my manual location, though, things are looking pretty good. Sun and moon data looks spot on. There was no discernible calculation delay (as with my PAS-400).

I'm very curious to see how accurate this watch is with tides. For today, the estimate is off by about 15 minutes. The lunitidal interval in my hometown varies by about three hours each cycle, and if the watch can figure that out I'll be extremely impressed. If it is a straightforward moon + interval calculation, though, I can set another time so that the tide should never be off by more than 90 minutes, which is fine for my purposes. I hope to figure this out in the next week or so, and I'll update this topic in my follow-up report.

The TIME+TIDE ALL display is fantastic. In the manual, I thought it would be crowded, but using the screen I've come to think that this is very well laid out. This would be so easy to get horribly wrong or just dump all data indiscriminately, which did not happen here. Again, a great bit of work in visual design.

The vibration is comfortable while sedentary. I'll try it while running, too, which will be in my follow-up. The speed of the vibration is slower than most phones, however, so if you leave it loose on a desk, it might (possibly) sound more like someone passing gas than a vibrating alert. You have been warned.

The "Setting completed" modal dialog can be dismissed by pressing any button. The duration of the message bothered me until I figured that one out.

The interval timer has one-shot settings, meaning that if you want to set up a multi-step timer, you have to hold A down for two seconds for each individual component that you want to set up; it is also impossible (?) to go back to a previously selected item. This is a bit wonky, but I'll probably get used to it. (Actually, I'll probably just use the app.)

The interval timer display shows current interval time, total timer time remaining, and current time. Fantastic.

The interval timer's alerts continue while in run mode, so if you want to time a round of sprints, you can, but (1) you have to start the timer before starting run mode, (2) you can't stop or skip intervals without first exiting run mode, and (3) the timer's intervals will not automatically align with the recorded laps. This is so close to being fantastic for use without an app, but not quite there. (I'd love to hear from someone at Casio about hardware and programming that went into this watch because I suspect there's a very good reason for this behavior.)

The stopwatch is your plain Casio stopwatch. It hasn't been updated in any way to use this watch's abilities. I would have expected, at least, the ability to make both stopwatch time and current time large, or perhaps the ability to show both the last split time and the current elapsed time, but no.

On the other hand, the stopwatch continues running in the background during run mode, so if you want to time your full workout but not log your warmup or whatever, you can do that.

Of course, the headline feature is run mode, which I haven't tested yet. I'm planning on taking a few runs with it before connecting it to the app, then a few after while connected with my phone to record GPS and calibrate the pedometer, then a few more without a GPS to see if it does indeed become more accurate. That'll take a week or so. So, uh, at this point I'm supposed to ask you to click 'like' and 'subscribe', but, really, if you're interested you'll probably be following this thread and see it anyhow.
 

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My largest complaint so far: holding down the fwd/rev buttons does not quickly increment the selection. (Holding the down button will exit everything and return you to the main display, except in run mode where it only cancels the lap summary screen.) Also, manually setting latitude and longitude requires setting numbers by one-tenth increments. To select a longitude of west 122.7, I had to push the down button five hundred and seventy three (573) times. This is a pain. Especially because this watch doesn't accept quick, repeated input: it needs to update the display before it'll accept another press. FFS. Moreover, it suggests that either (a) Casio didn't test this watch by hand, or (b) somebody did test this and it was found to be acceptable. I'm troubled by that: what other nuggets of horror will I uncover?
sounds like something you shouldve done via the app?
 

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For those of you who have the watch: How accuraty are you finding the pedometer? On mine, the step count is way off. I've had the watch for a few days now, and I like to wear my watches 24/7. When I wake up in the morning I've already taken around 800 "steps".

Today, my phone has been in my pocket all day as a comparison, and it reports 898 steps (I haven't moved much, I know), but the watch is reporting 2839 steps. Thats two-thousand steps more.

I've asked around reddit a bit and it's not just me reporting this behaviour.

I've updated the firmware (version 03) and set my height, weight, sex, etc correctly.

So: How are you guys finding the pedometer? Also, if you have other g shocks with pedometers, how does it compare to those?
 

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Just arrived from Reed's.....

Love love love the fit and feel. The strap is like buttah, so smooth and pliable. And the sizing incriminates between holes are smaller, so much easier to get a perfect fit

The color though, I'm not sold on it just yet... but I bet in no time, I will appreciate it more and more. I'm used to black G-Shocks, just takes time to accept change, lol.

I do also have the black on on pre-order from Reed's, so no regrets either way



"boys support boys"
 

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So, my first impressions were from setting up the watch without using a phone. As far as I can tell, the following features are not available without syncing to a phone -- meaning that all other features are available independently:

  • Set target values for step counts (in TIME+DAILY and TIME+MONTHLY status bars). Mine defaulted to 8000 steps daily.
  • Choose cumulative running time in the TIME+MONTHLY view. (Defaults to cumulative distance.)
  • Create a training plan.
  • In run mode, have auto-alerts for calories burned, time passed, and distance passed. The distance alert is an auto-lap feature.
  • In run mode, with each lap, show lap time and lap distance. (Defaults to lap time and split time.)
  • In run mode, increase accuracy of pace and distance by occasionally calibrating the device with connected GPS. (I'll be testing this in the next few days.)
  • Share records with Apple Health, Strava, and Google.
  • In timer mode, use custom names for each interval. (Defaults to TIMER_1 to TIMER_5.)
  • n.b.: The Move app does NOT appear to be able to store multiple timer sets like the Connected apps can.
  • Receive notifications.
  • Set custom filters that reduce which notifications are sent to the watch, e.g. turn off notifications from other apps while keeping the Move app notifications pushing to the watch.
  • Auto time adjustment.
  • Quick port setting (for sun/moon/tides).
  • Quick setting of world time name. You can always set the correct time zone with the watch, but you get to choose the display name with the app; if you're traveling to Lisbon, you'd set the time on the watch to London but with the app it'd display as Lisbon. Same time zone either way.
  • Change the screen-off time of day. (Defaults to 2 AM.)
  • Firmware updates.
  • Restore settings (I think?) after battery change.
  • Phone finder.
This isn't authoritative, so please don't make a purchase decision based on it, but just what I think I've seen from my own use.

So far, the only thing I've found on the watch that isn't in the app is the cadence value in the run logs. And, curiously, cadence isn't available to view on the watch while in running mode itself.

In my estimation, if you're not interested in notifications and willing to sacrifice convenience, you can get most of what this watch offers without having to use it with another device. I suspect my watch will therefore be in airplane mode most of the time, connecting a few times a week to transfer information and change settings. At least, until I'm spending more time out and about in the world.

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I'm going to take about the app in some detail. I don't talk much about watch functions because Casio's operation guides are wonderfully comprehensive and there are a lot of reviews out there already which go over basic operations. But the app doesn't let you try it out in demo mode, so it was a big question mark for me before I got my watch.

--

Setting the port with the app is fantastic. It is quick and straightforward. You can either browse on a list or drill down by region, country, then port name; each list is searchable.

When using an APP port, the tide graph on the watch shows not only high and low tides, and not only how high and how low, but also the irregular shapes of some tides. It appears to be presenting data taken from a government tide prediction table rather than an estimation calculated in-watch. Very nice. I wonder how often that information needs to be refreshed. I'll be sad if I ever have to do this manually again, which loses tide height, shape, and accuracy.

You can also set the USER ports from the app. It will write any port to one of three slots in memory. The watch will not display the port name, which is odd. The watch will calculate the tides, so you lose tide height, shape, and accuracy. But, you can quickly switch between three different ports -- chosen by you from around the globe -- without having to open the app. The app will not, however, edit ports that it reads from the watch's USER settings.

The app appears to have a "Saved Points" feature, but I wasn't able to save any ports to that list.

The app itself also displays the tide graph. So, if you want to check the tide, you can set the port in the app and get the current readings without having to fiddle with your watch -- and then, later, get the same details on your watch without having to fiddle with your phone. Nice.

---

Overnight, I found that the display is not great in dark rooms. This display, while far better than other negative LCDs I've seen, is not going to rival an analog watch with white indices and hands on a black face.

The light uses two LEDs. I suppose MIP isn't compatible with EL, sadly, so this is a step down from my other G-Shock. The LEDs are bright enough and point out enough that I can use them like headlights when walking around unfamiliar rooms at night. (As a traveler, mind you, not a burgler.) Feature or flaw, you decide. But, for being so bright, looking at it doesn't burn my eyes terribly -- I don't recall having any latent impression of the watch face after looking at it, which is unexpected. I think having a negative display helps here. Not nearly as nice as tritium tubes, not as nice as EL backlighting, but perfectly serviceable.

---

This morning I went for a run with the watch. Vibe alerts were noticeable without being intrusive. The pushers were easy enough to use for manual laps. However, the distance/speed/pace was way off. Like, 60% off. Like, I'm wondering if there was a units problem, because miles are 60% longer than kilometers. My watch was set to miles and the app was set to kilometers, so I suspect there's a bug there. I've set everything to miles now and will go for a walk this afternoon and another run tomorrow to see if this sorts out.

(I find it curious that I write "my" watch but "the" app. We seem to have a connection to physical things that is lacking in software.)

If it does work out, I'm loving having this data available without having to keep a GPS device charged. Don't get me wrong: fully capable GPS/HRM/kitchen-sink watches are amazing and wonderful tools. Just not the kind of tool I want.

---

The app really wants you to set up a training plan. But, if you haven't logged any runs yet, it assumes you're a complete novice. It'd be nice if I could tell it, "just let me log runs for a week, then remind me to set up a training plan which the app could calculate from those runs."

I'm a recreational/casual runner. I like getting better and I'm convinced that training plans with appropriate levels of intensity and periodicity do make for improvements. But I'm not interested enough to develop my own plan or pay a trainer to do that for me. So, it'd be a nice perk if this app can automate a nice plan for me.

The app looks like it will work well as a running journal. It shows lots of detailed views with an interface that doesn't bug me, which isn't exactly a compliment but you've seen how ready I am to offer criticism when I see problems. There is a memo field so I can enter a description of what I was doing and how it felt. My question here is whether the log can be exported.

I wish I could see running cadence in the app.

I wish I could hide unused fields (e.g., elevation).

I look forward to trying this connected to my phone's GPS. That should improve the pedometer's accuracy, though I need to establish a baseline before testing that. Moreover, when I want to log all of the data, it looks like I'll be able to do so, and it looks like I'll be able to use an external battery while doing so. I'm liking that prospect.

sounds like something you shouldve done via the app?
Yeah. Unfortunately for myself, I'm not very good at doing the prudent and reasonable thing. Most people not so afflicted will just use the app like you suggest.

I wanted to know how well this watch works independently of any other devices. In this case, surprisingly poorly ... but once you get there, it seems okay.

Also, on a less pragmatic note, if I were managing this project, I'd think it vital to look for the gap in my development team that allowed such a glaring problem to slip through. "This is bad, but you can do it another way, so I won't fix it" is great thinking when you're chasing high volumes without regard to brand reputation, but that's not the position Casio is in. That this problem exists just chafes for irrational reasons.

How are you guys finding the pedometer? Also, if you have other g shocks with pedometers, how does it compare to those?
I'm also taking fewer steps these days, which was partially why I got this watch. So far today, my watch is reporting about 10% more steps than my phone -- I don't have the Move app set up to share data with the Health app yet. I did a few chores with my watch but without my phone, so that's not implausible. I do seem to have gained 60 steps while writing this long post, though. I'll keep my eye on this going forward.

Edit: while reviewing my post, it went up 120 steps. I haven't stood up since starting this post. Hm. Writing big walls of text = lots of calories burned? My spouse might disagree with that equation.
 

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I'm also taking fewer steps these days, which was partially why I got this watch. So far today, my watch is reporting about 10% more steps than my phone -- I don't have the Move app set up to share data with the Health app yet. I did a few chores with my watch but without my phone, so that's not implausible. I do seem to have gained 60 steps while writing this long post, though. I'll keep my eye on this going forward.

Edit: while reviewing my post, it went up 120 steps. I haven't stood up since starting this post. Hm. Writing big walls of text = lots of calories burned? My spouse might disagree with that equation.
Really appreciate your detailed notes and look forward to hearing more about your experiences with the pedometer. Will post more of my own findings in that regard, too.

Overall it's a decent watch, but some of the mistakes they've made are baffling, for example requiring 7 button presses to read the contents of a notification instead of just assigning one of the buttons as a "jump directly to the latest notification" when one comes in.

It seems my step count outweighs yours by quite a bit, but it might be too early to make such a conclusion. Either way it sounds like it is way off for both of us. Will do a proper test along with another device I know to be pretty accurate tomorrow and see how it stacks up. For all I know it could be relatively accurate once you start walking, but simply way off when you're not, such as registering keyboard typing as steps, like you mentioned.

Really hoping a software fix will become available.

I've spoken with a g shock rep on Facebook but he had no answers, so I emailed their support dept. Will post reply if I receive one.
 

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Just arrived from Reed's.....

Love love love the fit and feel. The strap is like buttah, so smooth and pliable. And the sizing incriminates between holes are smaller, so much easier to get a perfect fit

The color though, I'm not sold on it just yet... but I bet in no time, I will appreciate it more and more. I'm used to black G-Shocks, just takes time to accept change, lol.

I do also have the black on on pre-order from Reed's, so no regrets either way



"boys support boys"
Beautiful, i am eager
 

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Alright, I decided to do my testing now (pedometer and distance tracking)

Prep

1) The watch was connected to my phone and GPS enabled in the app.
2) My height, weight, sex, etc has been correctly set
3) I mapped out a walk from A to B and back to A equating to 2.2km according to Google Maps (the entire trip is made on a sidewalk, and GMaps was set to "Walking", so 2.2km should be accurate)
4) Watch software was updated to v03 (latest at time of writing)

Execution

I initiated a workout (press B on watch) at point A, walked to B and immedietly returned to A, where I ended the workout and recorded the results.

Pedometer results

Watch: 2492 steps
Google Fit (phone): 2633

The watch recorded 141 steps less than the phone. That was very surprising. I was expecting the watch to be way higher.

My phone (which has been in my pocket pretty much all day) has a total of 4092 steps, whereas the watch says 6801 (2709 more). A few more on the watch is to be expected, but this is way out of acceptable proportion.

Distance results

Watch: 1.92km (.28 off)
Phone: 2.18km (very accurate)
Correct distance: 2.2km

Even with GPS enabled in the app and bluetooth connected, the watch distance was quite a bit off. It therefore seems distance is calculated by assumed stride length, not by the aid of GPS (what purpose does the GPS actually servere with this watch?).

Conclusion

The pedometer is really, really poor in that it falsely counts steps while typing, sitting and doing non-walking/running activities with an alarmingly high rate of false positives. Even sleep racks up an impressive amount of "steps". Unless it is fixed with a software update, I don't see how it can be relied upon at all.

The distance calculation is better, but not great.
 

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Beautiful, i am eager
Thanks! @Rammus

Well worth the $160! You will be very happy.
I hope they come out with some different versions of it.... I have a feeling this will be a growing part of my collection.

"boys support boys"
 

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Interesting, Stian. I'm surprised that the watch gave you a different distance from the phone even though it was connected to the GPS. That makes me wonder if it isn't reading raw data rather than the smoothed data provided by the OS.

(Well, I don't know about Android, but iOS appears to have a built-in "tell me the distance traveled" function. In preparation for this watch, I compared a mapped-out route and a GPS-logged route (with Footpath and Runmeter, respectively), and they varied by 0.01km over 12.1km, despite the GPS trail looking rather ragged. My hope has been that the accelerometer might be more accurate than GPS when going off road, particularly in valleys that don't see much of the sky where I've had trouble with GPS before.)

For this morning's run, run mode on, my watch reports a duration of 36'38 with a cadence of 166 spm, which implies 6081 steps. In about that same time span, my phone's pedometer reports 6239 steps. The phone includes a few minutes before and after, but I wasn't doing much walking in that time. I'd say those values agree pretty closely. (This might also be why my total steps mentioned in my last post were relatively close.)

I just returned from a walking errand trip, not using run mode. With the phone in my left front pocket and the watch on my left wrist, the watch gained 3487 steps while the phone gained 2995 steps. This despite carrying a grocery basket and then grocery bag on my left hand for about half of that trip, which I'd expect to have substantially reduced the step count.

A few thoughts at the moment:
- The run mode likely uses an increased sensitivity level from the accelerometer (and/or more intensive processing of its raw data). So, distance estimation might not be affected by daily step counting.
- The normal step-tracking might well correspond to some level of physical activity, just not steps. Since 10,000 steps or whatever is pretty arbitrary anyway, it might be enough to say "I want to target 15,000 Casio-steps, because that corresponds well, for me, with 10,000 steps elsewhere."
- Even if the pedometer and distance-estimation are completely worthless -- which I'm not yet convinced of, and which might be fixed in software -- I think this is a nice watch. I'm not even close to regretting much purchase. But I am starting to think I might be the lucky devil for whom this watch is perfectly tailored.

I should add: my initial setup was on a version before 03, but everything after that has been on 03.

Oh, and @stian133 -- if you have further correspondence with Casio, you might want to include a link to this thread.

Your optimistic curmudgeon,
Jon
 

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Interesting, Stian. I'm surprised that the watch gave you a different distance from the phone even though it was connected to the GPS. That makes me wonder if it isn't reading raw data rather than the smoothed data provided by the OS.

(Well, I don't know about Android, but iOS appears to have a built-in "tell me the distance traveled" function. In preparation for this watch, I compared a mapped-out route and a GPS-logged route (with Footpath and Runmeter, respectively), and they varied by 0.01km over 12.1km, despite the GPS trail looking rather ragged. My hope has been that the accelerometer might be more accurate than GPS when going off road, particularly in valleys that don't see much of the sky where I've had trouble with GPS before.)

For this morning's run, with run mode on, my watch reports a duration of 36'38 with a cadence of 166 spm, which implies 6081 steps. In about that same time span, my phone's pedometer reports 6239 steps. The phone includes a few minutes before and after, but I wasn't doing much walking in that time. I'd say those values agree pretty closely. (This might also be why my total steps mentioned in my last post were relatively close.)

I just returned from a walking errand trip, not using run mode. With the phone in my left front pocket and the watch on my left wrist, the watch gained 3487 steps while the phone gained 2995 steps. This despite carrying a grocery basket and then grocery bag on my left hand for about half of that trip, which I'd expect to have substantially reduced the step count.

A few thoughts at the moment:
- The run mode likely uses an increased sensitivity level from the accelerometer (and/or more intensive processing of its raw data). So, distance estimation might not be affected by daily step counting.
- The normal step-tracking might well correspond to some level of physical activity, just not steps. Since 10,000 steps or whatever is pretty arbitrary anyway, it might be enough to say "I want to target 15,000 Casio-steps, because that corresponds well, for me, with 10,000 steps elsewhere."
- Even if the pedometer and distance-estimation are completely worthless -- which I'm not yet convinced of, and which might be fixed in software -- I think this is a nice watch. I'm not even close to regretting much purchase. But I am starting to think I might be the lucky devil for whom this watch is perfectly tailored.

I should add: my initial setup was on a version before 03, but everything after that has been on 03.

Oh, and @stian133 -- if you have further correspondence with Casio, you might want to include a link to this thread. Social media has a way of incentivizing corporations, as well it should. And, I'd love to hear more of your (and others') in-depth thoughts. That's why I'm sharing mine. Geek is as geek does, if you'll forgive me for likening us.

Your optimistic curmudgeon,
Jon
 

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D'oh! I even reloaded the page to see if my post had already been posted. Sigh. I guess maybe that's why the forum software is being replaced. Apologies!
 

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D'oh! I even reloaded the page to see if my post had already been posted. Sigh. I guess maybe that's why the forum software is being replaced. Apologies!
Haha, no worries, happens to the best of us.

I recommend that you delete the content of your duplicate post and just write "DUP".

Being that it's long, otherwise no biggie

"boys support boys"
 

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Thanks, @babyivan. Looks like I need to post a certain number of times before I can edit my stuff ... but if a mod wants to do that for me, I'd pick the earlier one to remove.
 

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Today, I'm useless as far as work is concerned. And annoying for those of you who like short and sweet. But, for the rest of you...

Recap: I went for a run this morning, measured with my GBX-100 and phone GPS without connecting the watch to the GPS. The watch reported speeds that were way too fast. I suspect a bug in unit handling (where miles and kilometers are confused). At the time, my phone was set to display distances in kilometers while my watch was set to use miles.

Just now, I dumped my watch's data into a spreadsheet and factored distance-units by 1.609 to correct for a suspected bug in unit handling. (1 mile ~= 1.609 kilometers.) The results: just about exactly what I'd expect. I mean, surprisingly accurate, on the order of what I was hoping for after GPS calibration. If I can get this to work out of the box, I'm thinking that the GBX-100 (or GBD-100) is better for trail running in canopied valleys than any GPS could be. This could be include-in-SEO-title important stuff.
 
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