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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I've been on WUS for a while but solely on the G Shock side of things. However my dad recently gave me his 1980's 17 jewel Sekonda and this sparked my interest in various USSR watches.

In my limited research I found Zim to be a somewhat unpopular brand. Despite this I bought the watch below for £8. It wasn't running but I've managed to fix it and it seems to keep good time. I just wondered if anybody knew anything about this model at all? Thanks in advance.


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Hi, I've been on WUS for a while but solely on the G Shock side of things. However my dad recently gave me his 1980's 17 jewel Sekonda and this sparked my interest in various USSR watches.

In my limited research I found Zim to be a somewhat unpopular brand. Despite this I bought the watch below for £8. It wasn't running but I've managed to fix it and it seems to keep good time. I just wondered if anybody knew anything about this model at all? Thanks in advance.


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Very nice. Stunning face. Those numerals!
 

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A lot of ZIMs were made going by how many vintage examples are still available and in a remarkable number of designs. I've never seen that one before and it is not pictured in the only catalog I have seen with ZIMs in it. I would say it's from around 1970. It contains a version of the central second 41-m (2608) movement introduced by First Moscow (Poljot) in the early '50s. ZIMs either had this movement or a 2602 sub-second movement, more commonly. Neither movement is shock-proof. ZIMs were produced with the 2602 movement on into the early '90s.

Due to the lack of a sophisticated movement choice and no history of independent horological development, ZIMs occupy a slot a bit below the other more well-known soviet factories.

Your example has a unique font and what looks like a subtle "plaid" pattern on the dial. The red second hand was not that common on soviet watches and is probably not authentic, perhaps having been added by the seller to attract buyers.
 

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Hi welcome to the Russian forum, those Second watches are great little pieces. Cant give you any info but nice pattern dial.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A lot of ZIMs were made going by how many vintage examples are still available and in a remarkable number of designs. I've never seen that one before and it is not pictured in the only catalog I have seen with ZIMs in it. I would say it's from around 1970. It contains a version of the central second 41-m (2608) movement introduced by First Moscow (Poljot) in the early '50s. ZIMs either had this movement or a 2602 sub-second movement, more commonly. Neither movement is shock-proof. ZIMs were produced with the 2602 movement on into the early '90s.

Due to the lack of a sophisticated movement choice and no history of independent horological development, ZIMs occupy a slot a bit below the other more well-known soviet factories.

Your example has a unique font and what looks like a subtle "plaid" pattern on the dial. The red second hand was not that common on soviet watches and is probably not authentic, perhaps having been added by the seller to attract buyers.
Thanks schnurrp. Good knowledge. I did wonder if the hands were a retro fit.

I do think I may have just uncovered a new obsession

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No I haven't, thanks, comrade. '83 is too late for the subject watch but most interesting to note that at that time the only central second design pictured incorporated a 19 j 2609.HA movement which I assume had been sourced from Petrodvorets! I wouldn't mind having one of those. I wonder if they were ever produced?

Also, I've never seen watch bands/bracelets listed in a catalog before.
 
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