WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am new to horology, in study of considerable depth, and I've accumulated a long-lasting interest in watches and mechanisms of all kinds.
I am searching for advice on the following motion: making my own watch (not necessarily from scratch).
I am looking for advice on the gravity of the notion, research necessary, courses necessary (if so), tools, equipment and just general advice from the experienced.
I am of course most interested in mechanical watches and would prefer to own a railroad style pocket watch.
As of yet, I have been recomended the book Watchmaking: The Revised Edition, by George Daniels.
All help is greatly appreciated. Please bear in mind while advising, I live in Ottawa Canada...not much availiable to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Hello, great question I am trying to do the same. I have bought Beginner Watchmaking: How to Build Your Very First WatchTim A Swike

seems to be very good book with info on all the question you have above.

I had already many tools and parts but needed to buy more and I am still buying. It is starting to get expensive.

Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
846 Posts
Welcome aboard! It is unlikely you will find a watchmaker or business that will train you from scratch, if you wish to pursue the trade formally. I recommend going to school, and the only one in Canada is in Trois Rivieres. If you are in Gatineau, or were born in Quebec, you can take the course extremely cheaply, it is only a couple hundred dollars for two years. If you are not a Quebec citizen, the price jumps to about $4800. Of course, being a full time student means you have other expenses, however, you are virtually guaranteed a job, as the school actively helps you find one. Most French students choose to stay in Quebec, and there are more jobs for watchmakers there, and the business is generally healthier, I find.
Tools are always going to be pricey, and we all scrounge around flea markets and estate sales from jewellers and watchmakers. New tools can be had from several Material Supply Houses, and one here in Toronto is Perrin's, but there are others in the States and UK. You can PM me if you're interested, I can provide contact information.
Hope this helps!

Rob
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top