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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Have only recently become interested in high-end watches, but there are some practical things I wonder about.
Please direct me to the right threads if it has been discussed before.

1. I'm not talking about vintage watches. Only watches made after 2002.

If one would purchase a dead stock watch of let's say 2008-2010 (that hasn't been out of the box; "unworn", as mentioned in many ads, e.g. Audemars Piguet las vegas strip Search for a wristwatch ); what do you have to do when you receive it in terms of maintenance service? Is there a difference of approach if the watch has been out of the box for only a month (e.g. as a showroom model and thereby has probably been running for quite some period) and then put back in the box or if it is real dead stock and truly unworn?

What are you supposed to do upon receiving such a 2008-2010 dead stock watch?

Do you have to send it out to get it serviced in both the first example and second example?

In other words, is service due solely because of the manufacturing/production date of the watch or should one calculate when the watch is due for maintenance service by the actual actual used/"beating" time of the watch.

2. If you have more than one watch, do you keep an agenda in which you write the exact date when your watch is due to be send for maintenance service? Do you send it exactly 5 years after the last service or after you have purchased the new watch, no matter what?? or do YOU have certain criteria as to when to send your watch(es) to the service centers? I often read that certain folks hardly take care of their watches and only take their watches to service when it doesn't function properly and/or gives them problems. Some did it only after 10 years!! How often should a mechanical watch be serviced? Why does a watch need a service? What is a service? « Bernard Watch Blog You'll often read about there is much to gain for high-end manufacturers to say that the dead-line must be no longer than 5 years. Some even say every 3 years!

I can imagine that if you have a big collection that is purchased around the same date that it can become quite expensive if you send them out for service at the same time.

3. Is there some info on high-end watches (pam, ap, pp, jlc etc) and extreme temperatures and what this can mean for the watch in terms of service among others. I only read about the water resistance, but don't recall to have read about being for (lengthy) periods in high moist regions (Kalimantan/Indonesia). Or what about "desert countries" like Egypt?

4. Also, what if you spontaneously would get invited to come along to a sauna: Finnish sauna - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
steam bath/ hammam Steambath - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and are to far away to stash your watch somewhere safely and where the chances are hight it would get stolen from your locker. For example, would it do (much) harm to an ap roo w/ a water resistance of 100m, or a diver with 300m, or even a omega seamaster or a rolex sub both with a water resistance of 300m? Or do we have to look for other characteristics when determining? Just wondering because I've been invited quite a few times after work to come along, with no chance to bring home stuff like an expensive watch.

Thanks for reading.
 

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Have only recently become interested in high-end watches, but there are some practical things I wonder about.
Please direct me to the right threads if it has been discussed before.

1. I'm not talking about vintage watches. Only watches made after 2002.

If one would purchase a dead stock watch of let's say 2008-2010 (that hasn't been out of the box; "unworn", as mentioned in many ads, e.g. Audemars Piguet las vegas strip Search for a wristwatch ); what do you have to do when you receive it in terms of maintenance service? Is there a difference of approach if the watch has been out of the box for only a month (e.g. as a showroom model and thereby has probably been running for quite some period) and then put back in the box or if it is real dead stock and truly unworn?

What are you supposed to do upon receiving such a 2008-2010 dead stock watch?

Do you have to send it out to get it serviced in both the first example and second example?

In other words, is service due solely because of the manufacturing/production date of the watch or should one calculate when the watch is due for maintenance service by the actual actual used/"beating" time of the watch.

2. If you have more than one watch, do you keep an agenda in which you write the exact date when your watch is due to be send for maintenance service? Do you send it exactly 5 years after the last service or after you have purchased the new watch, no matter what?? or do YOU have certain criteria as to when to send your watch(es) to the service centers? I often read that certain folks hardly take care of their watches and only take their watches to service when it doesn't function properly and/or gives them problems. Some did it only after 10 years!! How often should a mechanical watch be serviced? Why does a watch need a service? What is a service? « Bernard Watch Blog You'll often read about there is much to gain for high-end manufacturers to say that the dead-line must be no longer than 5 years. Some even say every 3 years!

I can imagine that if you have a big collection that is purchased around the same date that it can become quite expensive if you send them out for service at the same time.

3. Is there some info on high-end watches (pam, ap, pp, jlc etc) and extreme temperatures and what this can mean for the watch in terms of service among others. I only read about the water resistance, but don't recall to have read about being for (lengthy) periods in high moist regions (Kalimantan/Indonesia). Or what about "desert countries" like Egypt?

4. Also, what if you spontaneously would get invited to come along to a sauna: Finnish sauna - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
steam bath/ hammam Steambath - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and are to far away to stash your watch somewhere safely and where the chances are hight it would get stolen from your locker. For example, would it do (much) harm to an ap roo w/ a water resistance of 100m, or a diver with 300m, or even a omega seamaster or a rolex sub both with a water resistance of 300m? Or do we have to look for other characteristics when determining? Just wondering because I've been invited quite a few times after work to come along, with no chance to bring home stuff like an expensive watch.

Thanks for reading.
Let me start by saying that most of what I do with my watches is not based on very much fact, but rather on what to me seems to make sense. Also, it's probably worth noting that the most complicated thing I own is watches with dates. What one must do and how often to maintain more complex watches/movements is probably different than it is with simple watches/movements.

  1. On the NOS watch, if I didn't know the service history, or knowing it's not been seen outside its shipping box since it left the factory, I would probably just have the thing looked at by a local watch repair guy. Mostly to get a sense of whether the lube inside has indeed congealed or moved out of place, or whatever. I'd take appropriate action based on what I found out. Hopefully, I could buy the thing in person and the seller would be able to verify the state of the watch for me.

  2. I keep the records of when my watches were serviced. I don't keep a ledger of the sort you've described. A ledger might be more efficient, but I just don' do it that way. In all honesty, I just use the "I think it's time" method of deciding when to send them for service. The ones with ETA inside, I just take to somewhere local, not even always in DC if I have to have one of those with me when I'm out of town.

    I have some watches that I wear relatively infrequently. I don't service them anywhere near as often as recommended, but I do service them. I've been advised, and I follow the advice, that it's a good idea to at least monthly make all mechanical watches operate for an hour or two, even if one doesn't wear it. The reason, I'm told, is just to keep the lube inside distributed. It's also been suggested that I flip the over between wearings, for much the same reason. Since I know it won't hurt, I just do it.

  3. I don't know any specific pronouncement on the longevity of the washers and seals and gaskets that keep water from getting into a watch. I just rely on my better judgment about it. I think prolonged exposure to heat and dry air could possible dry out things like seals and gaskets. I don't soak my watches in water to keep this from happening. I don't think I'd be terribly concerned about it in a very moist climate. I might think about it if I spent years in a desert climate with a mechanical watch. Lastly, I'm pretty sure that given enough time, any seal or gasket will cease to be effective, regardless of the climate. It happens to the washers in one's home faucets; I see no reason to think a different process is in play with the ones in washers.

  4. I would probably just enter the sauna/hot tub with my watch on, and indeed, I've done so on multiple occasions with a Rolex, a Tag, Omega and Movado. I don't believe the WR rating has anything to do with it because I believe that rating has to do with the pressure of the water, and gases present in the watch, not the existence of the water. At great depths, divers need to be inside a structure and helium gas is going to be present. Helium can get inside the watch at depth, regardless of the WR rating. As one ascends, the helium expands as do the seals that normally keep water out. The expanding gas exerts pressure on the watch's innards and can destroy them as well as burst off the crystal if one descended far enough. As far as I know, it's those factors that drive the WR rating on watches.

    I've never had occasion to be in a sauna or hot tub anywhere but on the surface of the planet, so water pressure hasn't ever come into play. I swim in pools and the ocean, but I've never gone more than 50 feet deep. All the watches I've worn doing so survived just fine.

    I think the things that make watches water resistant -- gaskets, washers, and such -- are susceptible to the same shortcomings as anything else. Sit a stack of heavy books on some "fluffy" thing and eventually that thing will lose some of its elasticity/fluff. I think in the same way that given enough exposure to great pressures (100 feet or more underwater) for long periods of time, the bits in a watch that keep the water out will eventually lose some of their elasticity.

    I've heard folks say their supposedly WR watch allowed water inside at some point or other, most commonly in a shower or pool or some other comparatively harmless environment. Though I haven't any empirical proof, I'm almost certain those folks experienced the issue, not because the WR rating was insufficient, but rather because the seals/washers/gaskets just dried out, became overly compressed or were defective to begin with.

    Lastly, as goes WR, so long as I'm at the surface of the planet, I don't worry much about my mechanical watches getting water inside. I know that if that should happen, I'll see condensation appear on the underside of the crystal. However, as they are mechanical, water alone shouldn't just destroy the movement. The "stuff" that is often dissolved in water could cause problems that in turn allow the water to cause oxidation of the movement parts, if they are made of a reactive metal (I don't know of any movements made entirely of non-reactive metals and/or "jewels"):
    • Salts can be abrasive and corrosive to the coatings on the movement parts
    • Chlorine can be corrosive
Of course, the above applies to simple movements. Those uber complicated ones are fidgety enough without water in there, I can see how all best might be off if water got into it. At the very least, the thing might need to be removed and dried out (most likely using heat evaporation as a method of doing so). If there's no evidence of corrosion's affect, it should be fine with some new lube applied.

Quartz movements are a different matter altogether. As electronic things, they are going to just die if they were operating under power when they were exposed to water. If they didn't have a battery (or some residual current flowing) in them when they got wet, they should still be fine once dried out completely.
Hope this helps. I'm sure others will have better input.

All the best.


That cuckold lives in bliss
Who, certain of his fate, loves not his wronger,
But, oh, what damnèd minutes tells he o'er
Who dotes, yet doubts— suspects, yet soundly loves!
- The Bard, Othello
 

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1) I personally would have a 3-5 year old watch serviced by its manufacturer
2) Manual winds are serviced every ~3-5 years and automatics every ~5-7 years. My dive watch every ~3 years. I try to stagger my watch servicings because they can be between 6w to 6m and expensive $500-$1,500. This is a reason in itself to stagger ones purchases over time.
3) Elevated temperature will accelerate chemical degradation of elastomer seals and lubricants. Prolonged exposure will shorten your service cycle. It is likely that watch companies have not studied this.
4) For the short duration that you will be in the sauna, it should be fine albeit uncomfortable because the watch will heat up to air temperature and your body will not.

Have only recently become interested in high-end watches, but there are some practical things I wonder about.
Please direct me to the right threads if it has been discussed before.

1. I'm not talking about vintage watches. Only watches made after 2002.

If one would purchase a dead stock watch of let's say 2008-2010 (that hasn't been out of the box; "unworn", as mentioned in many ads, e.g. Audemars Piguet las vegas strip Search for a wristwatch ); what do you have to do when you receive it in terms of maintenance service? Is there a difference of approach if the watch has been out of the box for only a month (e.g. as a showroom model and thereby has probably been running for quite some period) and then put back in the box or if it is real dead stock and truly unworn?

What are you supposed to do upon receiving such a 2008-2010 dead stock watch?

Do you have to send it out to get it serviced in both the first example and second example?

In other words, is service due solely because of the manufacturing/production date of the watch or should one calculate when the watch is due for maintenance service by the actual actual used/"beating" time of the watch.

2. If you have more than one watch, do you keep an agenda in which you write the exact date when your watch is due to be send for maintenance service? Do you send it exactly 5 years after the last service or after you have purchased the new watch, no matter what?? or do YOU have certain criteria as to when to send your watch(es) to the service centers? I often read that certain folks hardly take care of their watches and only take their watches to service when it doesn't function properly and/or gives them problems. Some did it only after 10 years!! How often should a mechanical watch be serviced? Why does a watch need a service? What is a service? « Bernard Watch Blog You'll often read about there is much to gain for high-end manufacturers to say that the dead-line must be no longer than 5 years. Some even say every 3 years!

I can imagine that if you have a big collection that is purchased around the same date that it can become quite expensive if you send them out for service at the same time.

3. Is there some info on high-end watches (pam, ap, pp, jlc etc) and extreme temperatures and what this can mean for the watch in terms of service among others. I only read about the water resistance, but don't recall to have read about being for (lengthy) periods in high moist regions (Kalimantan/Indonesia). Or what about "desert countries" like Egypt?

4. Also, what if you spontaneously would get invited to come along to a sauna: Finnish sauna - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
steam bath/ hammam Steambath - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and are to far away to stash your watch somewhere safely and where the chances are hight it would get stolen from your locker. For example, would it do (much) harm to an ap roo w/ a water resistance of 100m, or a diver with 300m, or even a omega seamaster or a rolex sub both with a water resistance of 300m? Or do we have to look for other characteristics when determining? Just wondering because I've been invited quite a few times after work to come along, with no chance to bring home stuff like an expensive watch.

Thanks for reading.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
@Tony, I am not of the opinion of Aardvark in the conformity topic: http://forums.watchuseek.com/f381/question-conformity-947106-3.html#post7044918 :-d I very much like how you always seem to take the time to reply extensively on questions or topics on this forum (you can tell Watches are your passion!:-! ). Thanks buddy, I learned a lot. P.S. congrats with your 1000th post! Do you get a watch of your choice from the forum owners? You deserve it! b-)

@iim, thanx for taking time to respond too. I really appreciate it. I'm still learning and ever since becoming interested in watches, I pretty much must educate myself as I hardly get to see my brother; who's just too busy doing business abroad; he's the only person I know with a passion for watches. :-s Thank God for forums.|>
 
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