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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I picked up this little (32mm) Gruen today at the pawn shop. They wanted $25 and gave it to me for $20. It was nice to open it when I got home and find that it was a bumper veri-thin and 14K gold case. Has a nice 460SS movement. Movement puts it to be about 1945 and yea, It also looks like an old redial to me.
Front.jpg
Movement.jpg
caseback.jpg
 

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Seiko, Orient, Aragon, Deep Blue, Bulova, Swatch, Gruen Pocket Watch, Illinois Pocket Watch, Vostok
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A thing of beauty!


Sent from the White House on the tax payers dime.
 

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Nice find! I think if you polish that crystal up or replace it, probably not a redial. Hard to tell with that much wabi on the crystal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I can't believe they sold you a 14k gold watch for $20. Great eye.
Well just looking at it I really couldn't tell myself if it was plated or gold. The caseback has no markings on it except for a persons name engraved on it. Not even a date of the engraving.
 

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Well just looking at it I really couldn't tell myself if it was plated or gold. The caseback has no markings on it except for a persons name engraved on it. Not even a date of the engraving.
I'm going to bet that the external gold content mark is right where the band and the case come together. Look there. I've an Elgin of similar vintage in a 14k case that I too picked up cheep and the seller didn't see the mark. I didn't see it until I had the band off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm going to bet that the external gold content mark is right where the band and the case come together. Look there. I've an Elgin of similar vintage in a 14k case that I too picked up cheep and the seller didn't see the mark. I didn't see it until I had the band off.
You are right. I just looked. Right on the edge of the case. Thanks Jack!
 

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I'm going to bet that the external gold content mark is right where the band and the case come together. Look there. I've an Elgin of similar vintage in a 14k case that I too picked up cheep and the seller didn't see the mark. I didn't see it until I had the band off.
Twice I picked up Lord Elgins in solid gold cases on Ebay, with low Buy It Now prices, listed as Gold Filled, even though they both showed pics of the inside caseback and you could SEE the '14kt Gold' hallmark.

Caveat Vendor, I say.
 

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It’s not indicative of anything by itself despite what you may hear from others. Some manufacturers used them OEM. If Gruen didn’t then it indicates a redial. So it depends if someone knows if Gruen did or didn’t use notched dials.
 

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Not sure I'm gonna mess with it for now. I did try to put some polywatch on the crystal but it didn't help much. I may just let it sit until I can get it serviced.
Polywatch alone at this stage doesn't help. This is the way to get in back in shape:

- Start with sandpaper 1500 grid. Go over the entire crystal. Don't get a heart attack, as the acrylic crystal will go totally blind. Wipe off dust with a cloth.
- Continue with sandpaper 2000 grid. Wipe off dust with a cloth
- Apply Polywatch, and everything will be crystal clear, unless there are some really deep scratches.

When you first do this, you should start with moderate pressure during all steps; repeat if necessary, especially in certain spots.

What many people don't understand: You cannot 'polish out scratches, only fill them with special substances. In other words, you have to sand everything down to the deepest spot of the scratch. Don't worry, they are usually not very deep and look more dramatic as they are. Polywatch has abrasive characteristics, but this is really the last, finishing step. I have done this a hundred and more times, never any problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Polywatch alone at this stage doesn't help. This is the way to get in back in shape:

- Start with sandpaper 1500 grid. Go over the entire crystal. Don't get a heart attack, as the acrylic crystal will go totally blind. Wipe off dust with a cloth.
- Continue with sandpaper 2000 grid. Wipe off dust with a cloth
- Apply Polywatch, and everything will be crystal clear, unless there are some really deep scratches.

When you first do this, you should start with moderate pressure during all steps; repeat if necessary, especially in certain spots.

What many people don't understand: You cannot 'polish out scratches, only fill them with special substances. In other words, you have to sand everything down to the deepest spot of the scratch. Don't worry, they are usually not very deep and look more dramatic as they are. Polywatch has abrasive characteristics, but this is really the last, finishing step. I have done this a hundred and more times, never any problem.
I think I may wait until I can get a new crystal on it. It has some stress cracks that I'm almost certain cannot be sanded out. I don't want to put too much pressure on those by sanding. Thanks for the info though!
 

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Polywatch alone at this stage doesn't help. This is the way to get in back in shape:

- Start with sandpaper 1500 grid. Go over the entire crystal. Don't get a heart attack, as the acrylic crystal will go totally blind. Wipe off dust with a cloth.
- Continue with sandpaper 2000 grid. Wipe off dust with a cloth
- Apply Polywatch, and everything will be crystal clear, unless there are some really deep scratches.

When you first do this, you should start with moderate pressure during all steps; repeat if necessary, especially in certain spots.

What many people don't understand: You cannot 'polish out scratches, only fill them with special substances. In other words, you have to sand everything down to the deepest spot of the scratch. Don't worry, they are usually not very deep and look more dramatic as they are. Polywatch has abrasive characteristics, but this is really the last, finishing step. I have done this a hundred and more times, never any problem.
I use a similar regimen on old tobacco pipe stem (acrylic or vulcanite). Are Micromesh sheets/pads a good step? They run up to 12,000 grit, which yields scratches are not visible to the naked eye.
 
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