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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


Just bought a copy of "Wristwatch Annual 2007" :)

I also have the 1999 and 2001 editions as well. Why is it that Seiko as a manufacturer is never included in this annual? It couldn't only be a bias for Swiss manufacturers (as it may appear to be); as they do have German and American companies in there. They also have many small companies represented too. :-s

With Seiko having such fine timepieces and innovative technologies, it is hard to imagine such a manufacturer being excluded from this catalog. :think:

Anybody want to share their thoughts about this? :thanks
 

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What American companies do they have in the annual?

As for Seiko, there is a very strong bias against Seiko for a variety of reasons. The bottom line is that on their higher end watches you get way more for your money - better fit and finish, better specs, at lower prices.

Call it Euro-Centrism not Swiss-bias and I think you may have it nailed.o|
 

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Some of the American watch companies that I see are: Ball Watch Co., Hamilton & Kobold.

I agree with your thoughts on Eurocentric bias in this annual. With Seiko being one of the few manufacturers that produces their entire watches in-house; you would think that they deserve the right to be recognized. :-!
 

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Some of the American watch companies that I see are: Ball Watch Co., Hamilton & Kobold.

I agree with your thoughts on Eurocentric bias in this annual. With Seiko being one of the few manufacturers that produces their entire watches in-house; you would think that they deserve the right to be recognized. :-!
Maybe "horological significance" is not based on issues such as in house movements, making everything in house, developing new technologies, but on other aspects. Such as marketing? Surely not. Noooo.

Gene Stone's book "The Watch" (which is not about watches, but men's wristwatches) does not mention Orient. Or any Chinese or Russian makers. And yet it is probably the case that more people wear a Chinese watch than any other kind.

The one thing that Seiko do not seem to have nailed down as well as European companies IMO is design, or style. I know I will get nailed for this, but I would only really rate a few Seiko as stylish, in the sense that Omega, Longines etc are, and those models are the Spirit, and the Grand Seikos. Go on, flame me, you know it makes sense. :)
 

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It is definately a bias issue against Seiko. But it may have to do with the fact that Seiko does not market their higher end models all over the world for some reason. Their style runs the gamit from European lookalikes to completely unique pieces. I am primarily interested in Diving / Sport watches and currently own the Landmaster with the 8L35 auto movement and the new Marine Master 600 Meter Spring Drive along with about 10 other high end European models. I think they each rival virtually any big name Swiss or other watch of their type that is made. It may be a little early to make this statement because I have only had the MM600SD for a few weeks now, but I think it may just be the best watch of it's kind made. It is easily the most accurate auto winding watch that does not use a battery (or capacitor) and electric drive and certainly the most inovative in a long time. I think it is rediculous that they don't have at least a couple of the high end Seikos in the magazine.
 

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Some of the American watch companies that I see are: Ball Watch Co., Hamilton & Kobold.

I agree with your thoughts on Eurocentric bias in this annual. With Seiko being one of the few manufacturers that produces their entire watches in-house; you would think that they deserve the right to be recognized. :-!
Although they are trying to move toward making their watches in the US, Kobold cases are currently made by Fricker in Germany and house Swiss movements, but are based in the US. Hamilton is owned by the Swatch group and I may be wrong but I don't think they are made in the US and they defineately have movements from elsewhere including Swiss. Ball is not the same company that they advertise as their origin; the maker of railroad watches, and I do not know where the cases or final assembly is done but they house Swiss movements as well. So none of those companies are entirely US made. There are a couple of very small makers in the US but many also start with Swiss movements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for sharing that Vince; I did not know those companies have moved on from their American homeland. :think: So I would guess that the catalog only features European only watches. Too bad, there are other great non-European watchmakers out there that make great watches. :-!
 

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I flipped through the Watch Annual in Barnes & Noble today. I could have sworn that I saw RGM in it. There's one American company.

...then again, I looked at so many watch mags, I may be mistaken.

Rob
 

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As far as I know there are no major watch makers left in the USA. There are a few small shops that turn out limited runs of watches and there are those that modify others products into something of their own - but no genuine large-scale manufacturers are left in the US.

Seamaster73 implied that the Watch Annual is merely a marketing brochure with ad space and that Seiko does not pay for space. After looking at one in the bookstore I think he may be right. It really does seem to be a marketing tool and I would question how the decisions are made for what is included as there were a LOT of watches that are not innovative, stylish, or exactly much of anything other than a retooling or revision of someone elses design or idea. If style were the main deciding issue none of the Tags would qualifyb-) If innovation were the main deciding point Rolex would not have much in the book.

I disagree about Seiko no having much style. They have a LOT of variation and style innovation in their quartz and non-automatic lines. It may not be to your taste but they are selling to Asian audiences and do a terrific job in that regard. The autos are more conservative, its true. Then again, look at their market for them - Japanese businessmen and the broader Asian business community generally.
 
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