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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello to all,

I'm starting to have a certain number of automatics, and some of them tend to be more in the box than on my wrist.

I got the habit to manually wind my watches once per day. I take them out of the box, for a few having screw-down crowns I unscrew them (which is more tedious), I give them a good 10-20 rotations, and back to the box...

My question is simple: instead of a manual winding should I rock the watches up and down for 30s instead ?

Is there a difference in terms of mecanics durability between the two processes?

Thanks for enlightening me!

Nicolas
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I clarified the title which -I agree- was misleading:
I know the difference between manual and auto winding, I'm concerned if it's dangerous (?) for the movement to manually wind an automatic every day...
Thanks for your answers!

Nicolas
 

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Some automatics (the ETA 2824-2 is somewhat known for this) don't have the most robust manual winding gear trains in the world. I don't think I'd recommend making a daily habit of winding all of your watches if you have any with suspect issues like this. If you really need to keep them running, maybe invest in a watch winder. Otherwise, just let them run down and give them a few shakes to get them started again, then set them, when you want to wear them.

https://www.watchuseek.com/f2/eta-2824-winding-issue-2322506.html
 

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I clarified the title which -I agree- was misleading:
I know the difference between manual and auto winding, I'm concerned if it's dangerous (?) for the movement to manually wind an automatic every day...
Thanks for your answers!

Nicolas
Firstly, are your watches able to be manually wound? If it does, do you think the watch manufacturer would put this feature if it was dangerous to the watch? You have 2 options to wind your watches for convenience so either method should be safe.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Some automatics (the ETA 2824-2 is somewhat known for this) don't have the most robust manual winding gear trains in the world. I don't think I'd recommend making a daily habit of winding all of your watches if you have any with suspect issues like this. If you really need to keep them running, maybe invest in a watch winder. Otherwise, just let them run down and give them a few shakes to get them started again, then set them, when you want to wear them.

https://www.watchuseek.com/f2/eta-2824-winding-issue-2322506.html
Thanks! Helpful info, much appreciated!

Nicolas

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I'm not an expert, and I didn't even stay in a Holiday Inn last night.

However, if I may, I do read quite consistently that the winding train on automatics like the ETA 2824-2 is not as robust as the hand-winding 2804-2 or 2801-2.

@xernanyo, to be fair, there are plenty of products out there where a customer option can damage a product. Volume knobs don't have hard stops to keep from blowing out a speaker. Cars don't automatically shut off when someone drives away after an oil change and forgets to put in new oil. As I'm sure someone's wise grandfather said once, "Just because you can doesn't mean you should."

@mougino, I'd consult your user manual and warranty info. If you want to keep them running while off the wrist, winders aren't terrible investments. For what it's worth, a lot of user manuals seem to say something like, "If the watch has stopped, wind until the seconds hand starts moving, then put it on the wrist." The implication being that one should limit the manual winding and get it on automatic winding as soon as feasible.

Not a watchmaker, repair guy, or learned collector of 300 mechanical watches. Just parroting what I've heard on it.
 

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Good advice regarding the 2824-2/2836-2/2834-2, but other movements are safer.

What's missing is the screw down crown issue. That will cause wear and tear on the screw-down mechanism and you have to be careful not to strip the threads. Obviously it's meant to be used, but manually winding them daily may shorten the life of the screw-down mechanism depending especially on how careful you are.

Honestly, once you have more than one and definitely more than two automatics, it's a fool's errand to try to keep them running by hand. The real options are:

- Get a winder, at the cost of increased wear & tear. IMHO this is more desirable for watches with perpetual calendars, non-quickset dates, etc. that are a hassle to reset.

- Just let the watch wind down, and benefit from reduced wear & tear while idle with the cost of needing to reset them when you're ready to wear them again.

IMHO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Good advice regarding the 2824-2/2836-2/2834-2, but other movements are safer.

What's missing is the screw down crown issue. That will cause wear and tear on the screw-down mechanism and you have to be careful not to strip the threads. Obviously it's meant to be used, but manually winding them daily may shorten the life of the screw-down mechanism depending especially on how careful you are.

Honestly, once you have more than one and definitely more than two automatics, it's a fool's errand to try to keep them running by hand. The real options are:

- Get a winder, at the cost of increased wear & tear. IMHO this is more desirable for watches with perpetual calendars, non-quickset dates, etc. that are a hassle to reset.

- Just let the watch wind down, and benefit from reduced wear & tear while idle with the cost of needing to reset them when you're ready to wear them again.

IMHO.
Great advice! I think I'll leave the watches idle until worn, ideally the maximum time idle should not be greater than a few weeks I'll try to rotate and give each some wrist time once per month ;)

Nicolas

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Great question, and something I worried about when I had my first autos. Research I did lead me to a few places, including watch repair sites and various brand sites where this issue was discussed.

The general idea seemed to be one of proceeding gently, if choosing to keep them wound manually, giving the watch crown a few gentle, slow turns, then swirl it to get the balance going, set the time and wear the watch, relying more on arm movement than winding manually. Debate seemed to be big on what kind of movements are more affected by hand winding than others, with some thought that those meant to be powered by arm movement may not be as robustly built for manual winding, and of course, on the other side, watches built so well that it poses no risk. A repair site did talk about dealing with damage from over zealous manual winding, but that seemed more related to less expensive movements. Even so, there was a note of caution about manual winding of autos, as opposed to letting the watch do the work, while being worn.

I solved it by getting into winders. They aren't hugely expensive (well, they can be, but you can find great ones for affordable prices that look terrific and do their job), they provide an attractive storage place for your autos (some even have cool lights built into them) plus, you never have to worry about your autos running out of juice, meaning you can just grab it out of the winder and wear it, without the daily or nightly ritual of a hand winding.

Then again, I own too many watches, haha, so it would be a full time job to keep them all wound, without winders.

I guess my sense if became more one of better to be safe than sorry, added to the convenience of a good looking storage solution that also keeps the watch wound and ready to wear.

Just my thoughts.
 
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Great question, and something I worried about when I had my first autos. Research I did lead me to a few places, including watch repair sites and various brand sites where this issue was discussed.

The general idea seemed to be one of proceeding gently, if choosing to keep them wound manually, giving the watch crown a few gentle, slow turns, then swirl it to get the balance going, set the time and wear the watch, relying more on arm movement than winding manually. Debate seemed to be big on what kind of movements are more affected by hand winding than others, with some thought that those meant to be powered by arm movement may not be as robustly built for manual winding, and of course, on the other side, watches built so well that it poses no risk. A repair site did talk about dealing with damage from over zealous manual winding, but that seemed more related to less expensive movements. Even so, there was a note of caution about manual winding of autos, as opposed to letting the watch do the work, while being worn.

I solved it by getting into winders. They aren't hugely expensive (well, they can be, but you can find great ones for affordable prices that look terrific and do their job), they provide an attractive storage place for your autos (some even have cool lights built into them) plus, you never have to worry about your autos running out of juice, meaning you can just grab it out of the winder and wear it, without the daily or nightly ritual of a hand winding.

Then again, I own too many watches, haha, so it would be a full time job to keep them all wound, without winders.

I guess my sense if became more one of better to be safe than sorry, added to the convenience of a good looking storage solution that also keeps the watch wound and ready to wear.

Just my thoughts.
Yes. Do it gently. The watch, it is designed to treated in many ways. Yes you can wind, you can shake, you can dive, do whatever you want with your watch, but please do it gently. Don't put lot of stress to it.

After all your watch is consist of many many very thin series of cog, screw, and gears.

And it pushing and pulling all together. It may bent, loose a teeth, break, when you put lot of stress on them.
 

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I do it all the time with no ill effects (yet!) for the same reason, it's easier to give a quick wind if I think I might wear the watch in a day or two than to let it run down and reset the time
 

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After 55+ years, still no "wear and tear" because of that, myslelf on the other hand, a much different story.
Winding via the crown may increase wear and tear on the gears of the movement but this would also ensure that the watch is running at optimum capacity.

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Buy watch winders, that way you do not have to worry about damaging the mechanism. I prefer Orbita and have several, but wolf and a few others are cheaper and would get the job done.
 

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Some automatics (the ETA 2824-2 is somewhat known for this) don't have the most robust manual winding gear trains in the world. I don't think I'd recommend making a daily habit of winding all of your watches if you have any with suspect issues like this. If you really need to keep them running, maybe invest in a watch winder. Otherwise, just let them run down and give them a few shakes to get them started again, then set them, when you want to wear them.

https://www.watchuseek.com/f2/eta-2824-winding-issue-2322506.html
I just let mine die between wearings - getting them set up for a day's action when I wear them isn't at all hard.
 

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Great advice! I think I'll leave the watches idle until worn, ideally the maximum time idle should not be greater than a few weeks I'll try to rotate and give each some wrist time once per month ;)

Nicolas
With respect, the 'maximum time idle' is nonsense and you're wasting your time worrying about it. No harm in letting a watch sit unused for prolonged periods. Mine sit idle for months on end...
 
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