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Hello.

I am new here and trying to find the identity of an old pocket watch. The story is that my great-grandfather brought this watch from Sicily when he came to America in the early 1900s and eventually settled near Galveston, Texas. It has a steel case that was originally painted black (my brother thought it was rust and polished much of it off).

It does not have a cover on the front, so I guess it is considered an "open face". The front crystal does come off. It does not run and I haven't found a watch shop that seems interested in working on it. The back cover comes off (it is not hinged) and a glass cover is over the mechanism. I haven't been able to remove the back crystal yet. No identification is readily visible on the movement. However, inside the back cover is the word "Acier" which is French for "steel' above a Swiss cross. The word below the cross is obscured, but appears to end in "ant".

Scratched into the cover is either "1901" or "1907" and some letters that may be my great-grandfather's initials.

It has a handsome porcelain face with pink raised circles and black numbers and delicate gold colored hands. To set the watch, you push in the button and turn the stem.

Any ideas?
View attachment 11061146 View attachment 11061194

Thanks.
 

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Mod. Russian, China Mech.
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18,150 Posts
It looks like a late 19th century Roskopf-type, low-cost Swiss pocket watch. Steel would be an unusual material for such a watch, so I suspect that it is made of some cheaper metal. Repairs are likely to be expensive.
 

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Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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17,901 Posts
Welcome to Watchuseek! Your watch looks like it might have this movement:

bidfun-db Archiv: Uhrwerke: Liga 315

...in which case, the balance cock is bent inwards. If that is indeed the case, it's no wonder that your entire balance assembly (pivot, hairspring, etc.) looks trashed. I am sorry but, sentimental though it is to you, there is almost no way of fixing that one except for by finding a donor movement or totting up a large bill.

Hartmut Richter
 
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