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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

Why not have an old-timers and vintage wrist watches archive here
? I know we post monthly in WRUW threads, but would be lovely if we post our vintage timepieces under one roof here in f11 forum.

Lets do it with some basic information added so it can be also a learning tool for newcomers and cross brand information for all of us. I believe we have the largest range within other subforums with centuries old history, vintage wrist and pocket watches are the core of enthusiasts and collectors.

I
never saw a person who owns only one vintage watch:) I know I am not alone, one can fulfill here half dozen of pages.

Here we go, let it come:

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A.R & J.E. Meylan, cases Ch27 C12 manual wind chronograph from Marius Meylan's Lemania, later called Lemania cal 2310.
Introduced first in 1942. Also known as the Omega cal 321.




Let's see those beauties!




e
 

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This was a present from the other half. She bought it from her old neighbour in Poland whos dad gave it to him. His grown up children have no interest in it so he decided to sell it.

Longines pocket watch.
Made in 1912.


Behold a simple thing of beauty..........and 100 years old!







Outter case lid open:






Inner case lid open:













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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
beautiful pieces, let 'em come,pocket and wrist watches, all vintage timepieces.



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Kind of up & down chrono style with day & date, powered by Venus 214, never saw this configuration before aquiring this timepiece. The brand ' Azhar ' looks like registered in 1953 Swiss but did not see many examples, probably vanished within many generic makes.
 

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Great thread idea, so let's keep it going!

This was my Dad's watch which he picked up in an auction and wore for about 20 years before it broke and gave it to me. He wears a quartz Seiko now. ;-)

1955 Omega Constellation automatic (in need of some restoration)
17 jewels Caliber 354 "bumper" automatic movement.











 

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Very good idea! My Hanhart Family is a part of german watch history. A few years ago Hanhart decided to move the wristwatch production from Germany to Switzerland.

The picures show chronographs from 1940 Cal. 40 to 1957 Cal. 42 to 1996 Cal. Valjoux 7760. The stopwatch was made for the Luftwaffe early 1940's.



Best regards

Felix
 

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In the 1950s my dad had to leave to go to England to find work. He ended up working and living in England for 20 years before he came home. When he arrived over there and found work he bought himself this watch brand new. He says it was "just a cheap watch but a good time keeper" and as you can see, he gave it a hell alot of use! He gave me it when I was a child to play with but I actually kept it safe. I would wear it when ever my digital watch needed a battery change and was always amazed how accurately it kept the time.
Unfortunately a few years ago I was not such a good caretaker of it. And while wearing it out in torrential rain paint balling with a cracked crystal it obviously got a lot of moisture in it. It then sat in a drawer for a few years allowing the stem and crown to corrode and effectively weld themselves to the case. So last year I had the cracked crystal replaced, a new stem and a new crown fitted. But she is now as before, keeping very accurate time. And it looks alot better on my wrist than the photos do it justice as the metal (brass?) brightens up from wearing it where the gold plating has worn off.

Just as a foot note I think it is interesting that I call this a "dress watch" as this was worn while working in factories and on the docks, and going out in the evenings. And it took it all in its stride.

1950s Junghans dress watch.
17 Jewels manual movement.
Made in Germany.









 

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Nice story Joe. I have had a few watches made by companies that were generally known for making clocks (like Kienzle) and they sometimes have nice brass cases and movements.

I guess I will go for a round two. :) Story and pics...

When I started working on watches around 10 years ago, I mostly stuck to Timex. They were easy to kick-start, and I just plain liked Timex, having grown up with them. One day a friend of mine called me saying he what he thought was a solid gold Timex. Sure enough, it was! We negotiated a price and it was mine. Since that time I had picked up a second one, and love the idea that while most collectors may not have ever known that Timex had made a solid gold watch, I have two of them!!

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Woow, love those Hanharts, especially the one with the uneven distance of chrono pushers. Always have admired those timepieces. Nice Omegas, classics, generations long heirlooms. Will be a great reference thread for beautiful vintage timepieces, let em come.Thank you for sharing those eye candies.


Here comes the first automatic wrist watch: Harwood, a bit background and photos.Was lucky to find one serviced, not sure my local watchmaker would be able to handle it and might be needed to send to Germany.

Invented by John Harwood,an Englishman from Isle of Man and patented in 1920 in Britain and in 1923 in Switzerland. The guy was obviously pissed from the existing wristlet watches during the WW I and the issues caused by dust, so he designed something without a visible crown, dustproof. He went to Switzerland patented his invention and A.Schild helped him with the movement mechanism, Fortis in casing in the protype.

The first mass production was with 14,000 pieces by Harwood patent, AS movement assistance and Blancpain casing this time. Until 1931, 30,000 pieces were produced and also exported to the U.S by the distribution of Blancpain. The invention was the bumper automatic as we call now, self winding in those times. The patent was not renewed in 1931 due to financial problems and the company vanished. But this automatic wrist watch was a beginning for a new era. Eugene Meylan from Glycine came up with an easier servicable caliber, which was similar to this one but as a module mounted on manual wind movements. Rolex came up with the perpetual full winding rotor 360 degrees, and Bidynator showed up with the bi-directional rotor windings later on. There were also some interesting winding mechanisms from the lugs, case pumping...So goes the automatic wrist watch history on...

Harwood in Rose Gold:

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The crown is in the case ( as seen in the below picture down ). It is operated by the bezel from the dial side. Once you turn the bezel, the indicator on the dial goes white and you set the time, then turn counter direction it becomes red again , locked and working mechanism. Power reserve is 12 hours.
 

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Picked this up today at an antique shop for $60. I shook it a couple of times, and it spun right up. I'm guessing this has a 17 jewel movement and was made sometime in the 60s or 70s from what I've found so far.


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Great old timers and some real classics being posted in this thread.

Here's my 1943 Omega 30T2SC pilots watch.

I like this watch for its shear simplicity and functionality of design and the fact
that it contains possibly the best, in many respects, 30mm movement ever made.



This movement is in fantastic condition! You are very lucky!
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
My Dad's Hamilton 23. My brother's had this for years and I finally asked him for some photos. Judging by the serial number it's circa 1942 production. He never spoke about WWII, so I have to assume this was issued to him when he joined the USN hunting subs out of Lakehurst.

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Looks like the type 7 timepieces for the US Army, beautiful.


Ashar, that bracelet must be ' bonklip '- so they were called and branded, very practical.


This thread can not be without an Airman. First examples from 1952-53 with Felsa movements later on with various AS calibers. This one is from 1962 - 67 period Glycine Airman Special. The movement is an Adolph Schild 1700/01 caliber, there is a tiny hole at 24 o'clock, once the crown is pulled a tiny pin pops out and stops the seconds hand, interesting and unique hack feature. More information about these beauties at Mr. Airman Andre's website :)

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