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I am Looking at a PO with the Caliber 3313. I know it does not compare to the new 9300 but have heard that I would be better off with the Caliber 1164 than the cal3313. What is everyone experience with the PO with the 3313 ? So yea or na on the 3313
 

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There are plenty of threads regarding the 3313 movement here. I was thinking of getting a Speedy Broad Arrow with that movement until I read so many negative things about it. Some have good things to say about it, but I wasn't willing to take the chance.
 

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I'm not sure whether a PO exists with a 3313, your talking about the chrono right? :S... then no I wouldn't get it, too many negatives to out weight a positive, which in the end if its breaks, will most likely be replaced with another movement, or a dif. caliber unit.

Plus anyway its not that much diffrence in saving for a 9300.
 

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The first generation PO Chrono came with the 3313 caliber. In my opinion, this is a truly wonderful chonograph caliber and it's in an entirely different league than the more basic caliber 1164 (based on the ETA 7750). The 3313 comes with pretty much everything you could possibly want in terms of technology; it has state-of-the-art vertical coupling, a column wheel, a free sprung balance and a co-axial escapement (two levels in 3313A/B and three levels in 3313C) among other things. It's a highly cultivated caliber and a feast for the eye when it comes to the esthetics. It had issues in the past though, mostly regarding the 3313A during the first few years of production concerning the chronograph reset function. The 3313B is an improved variant and is safe to buy (that's not to say that all of the 3313A's should be rejected; many of them have performed excellent since day one).

Here's my Speedy Broad Arrow 1957 with the 3313 caliber.

Regards
Undersköterskan

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The 3313 is based on an F. Piguet calibre, and as noted is a column wheel movement with vertical clutch. It is a thinner and much more sophisticated movement that the 7750 based Cal. 1164.

Because it's thinner, there are some compromises, but I don't think these are significant.

The only "advantage" of the Cal. 1164 based watches is that 7750's are very common, so parts are readily available, and there are many watchmakers who can service them. The Cal. 3313 (and the related non co-axial calibres like the Cal. 3301A I have in the shop right now) are watches that not every watchmaker wants to tackle.

I am certainly a big fan of the ETA 7750 - it is robust, accurate, and quite easy to service. Having said that if you want something a bit more special, the 3313 is it.

Cheers, Al
 

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Personally I would stay away from it. But that is just me.
 

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I've owned a couple - never a problem and no regrets. I'd rather have that one any day than a 7750. I would hope than any problems they may have had when these movements were introduced (a good long while ago now) would have been worked out by now.
 

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The first generation PO Chrono came with the 3313 caliber. In my opinion, this is a truly wonderful chonograph caliber and it's in an entirely different league than the more basic caliber 1164 (based on the ETA 7750). The 3313 comes with pretty much everything you could possibly want in terms of technology; it has state-of-the-art vertical coupling, a column wheel, a free sprung balance and a co-axial escapement (two levels in 3313A/B and three levels in 3313C) among other things. It's a highly cultivated caliber and a feast for the eye when it comes to the esthetics. It had issues in the past though, mostly regarding the 3313A during the first few years of production concerning the chronograph reset function. The 3313B is an improved variant and is safe to buy (that's not to say that all of the 3313A's should be rejected; many of them have performed excellent since day one).

Here's my Speedy Broad Arrow 1957 with the 3313 caliber.

Regards
Undersköterskan
I agree with everything said here. I had the same fears as the OP, but I did not want a run of the mill, off the shelf 7750-based movement. The Omega watches this this movement are a great value IMO, especially used. It's a special movement that (AFAIK) is not used in any other watches. Also, the chronograph actuation is extremely nice.

I have a Planet Ocean with this movement. I got mine as a gift from my wife used, and I've had it for almost a year. It's typically accurate within 1-2 seconds, and I've had zero problems with it (knock on wood). Also, all of the problem threads that I found when I was searching were for years ago. I have a theory that all of the "bad apples" have been repaired by now.

If you do some searching, there is a lot of good information about this topic, and the difference of the various "A, B, C" movements.

 

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I'm not sure whether a PO exists with a 3313, your talking about the chrono right? :S... then no I wouldn't get it, too many negatives to out weight a positive, which in the end if its breaks, will most likely be replaced with another movement, or a dif. caliber unit.

Plus anyway its not that much diffrence in saving for a 9300.
I disagree with everything said here.

-Of course a PO exists with this movement.
-Any qualified watchmaker would repair the 3313 in the unlikely event that it breaks.
-There is over a $1k difference from the 3313->9300. I don't consider that small. The difference is even greater when looking at used watches.
 

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While the 3313 has all the fruit, it is still not regarded as robust.

As I've done before, I would point you to a pic from the Omega service manual of the intermediate driving wheels. As you can see they are rivetted. The service bulletin recommends literally smothering these wheels with lubricant because of their propensity to fail.

I dont care what anyone says, a high-end chronograph should not have such shoddy construction.....IMO

intermediatedrivingwheels.jpg
 

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I disagree with everything said here.

-Of course a PO exists with this movement.
-Any qualified watchmaker would repair the 3313 in the unlikely event that it breaks.
-There is over a $1k difference from the 3313->9300. I don't consider that small. The difference is even greater when looking at used watches.
I see your point, please re-read my post because I think you've missed the point on a couple things.
-Of course a PO exists with this movement.
"I'm not sure whether a PO exists with a 3313, your talking about the chrono right? :S"

I couldn't recal off the top of my head what the chrono PO had previously, thats why I asked :p the 3313 is more associated with Speedys anyway :D

-Any qualified watchmaker would repair the 3313 in the unlikely event that it breaks
Yes any qualified watchmaker could repair almost anything in the event that it breaks, would it be affordable? Its more expensive than the generic 7750 additions (no I'm not saying the PO had a 7750 so you people don't misunderstand that) etc the rest I'll leave the answer to the OP since he was asking for a opinion on the matter. Which kinda of leads me to your last answer.
-There is over a $1k difference from the 3313->9300. I don't consider that small. The difference is even greater when looking at used watches
Ah yes, what is the diffrence in service costs? The 9300 will go down if you have a "qualified watchmaker" since they'll make a lot of the movement in question and lots of parts to back it up, while the 3313s will go up in service costs(less generic parts, more hard to find stuff in the future, who knows...?)


So in the end you might "save" with buying the 3313, until you need to head down to service it. If your looking for something more unique than the run of the mill mass produced stuff. I guess this is a bit better as others have stated, and if you want to stand out from the crowd, yes the 3313 is definatley that.

I guess we'll have to agree to disagree on some points :D
 

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I would listen to Archer, he know's a lot more about these things than most on here.

Personally, I've read a lot more horror stories about the 2500 movement than the 3313.
 

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While the 3313 has all the fruit, it is still not regarded as robust.

As I've done before, I would point you to a pic from the Omega service manual of the intermediate driving wheels. As you can see they are rivetted. The service bulletin recommends literally smothering these wheels with lubricant because of their propensity to fail.

I dont care what anyone says, a high-end chronograph should not have such shoddy construction.....IMO

View attachment 846297
Every time that the 3313 gets mentioned, this photo is posted. I've never heard an actual story of this part of the watch actually failing or having a problem. Not saying that it's never happened, but this is not where most of the failures have seemed to occur.
 

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I see your point, please re-read my post because I think you've missed the point on a couple things.
-Of course a PO exists with this movement.
"I'm not sure whether a PO exists with a 3313, your talking about the chrono right? :S"

I couldn't recal off the top of my head what the chrono PO had previously, thats why I asked :p the 3313 is more associated with Speedys anyway :D

-Any qualified watchmaker would repair the 3313 in the unlikely event that it breaks
Yes any qualified watchmaker could repair almost anything in the event that it breaks, would it be affordable? Its more expensive than the generic 7750 additions (no I'm not saying the PO had a 7750 so you people don't misunderstand that) etc the rest I'll leave the answer to the OP since he was asking for a opinion on the matter. Which kinda of leads me to your last answer.
-There is over a $1k difference from the 3313->9300. I don't consider that small. The difference is even greater when looking at used watches
Ah yes, what is the diffrence in service costs? The 9300 will go down if you have a "qualified watchmaker" since they'll make a lot of the movement in question and lots of parts to back it up, while the 3313s will go up in service costs(less generic parts, more hard to find stuff in the future, who knows...?)


So in the end you might "save" with buying the 3313, until you need to head down to service it. If your looking for something more unique than the run of the mill mass produced stuff. I guess this is a bit better as others have stated, and if you want to stand out from the crowd, yes the 3313 is definatley that.

I guess we'll have to agree to disagree on some points :D
I don't think that I've missed the point on anything. I doubt that any watch maker would swap in a different movement (if that's even possible) in the event of a failure as you suggested. I know that mine would not do this, and I also know that mine said that he would have no problems servicing or getting parts for this movement. I also doubt that Omega will stop making parts for it any time soon.

Also, I'd be willing to wager that the 9300 would be MORE expensive to repair or service compared to a 3313. The question of reliability between the two will only be told with time. The 9300 is still quite a new movement, but I'd hate to see what the silicone parts would cost to replace on the watch, not to mention two mainspring barrels, etc.

I'm not bashing the 9300 in any way. It's a much nicer and more advanced movement than the 3313, and seems to be more robust. It's just much more expensive. I couldn't afford the 9300, but I think that the 3313 is an extremely nice alternative, and I chose not to avoid it just because a few people on a forum had problems with their early models. I'm giving the same advice to the OP.

Also, the abbreviation of "you are" is "you're."
 

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Google the technical guide for the Omega 8500 movement. Under barrel bridge lubrication the same style riveted gear is shown. Maybe the 8500 needs to be avoided as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The reason I ask this is .... The new PO with the 9300 just isn't in my budget. I wish it was !! I have found a used PO gen1 with the 3313 or I can get a brand new SM 300m chrono diver. I have read on other forums were people have said the 3313 is not worth the extra money over the 1164 My biggest problem with the 300m chrono dive is size . I like the 44mm size
 

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The reason I ask this is .... The new PO with the 9300 just isn't in my budget. I wish it was !! I have found a used PO gen1 with the 3313 or I can get a brand new SM 300m chrono diver. I have read on other forums were people have said the 3313 is not worth the extra money over the 1164 My biggest problem with the 300m chrono dive is size . I like the 44mm size
You can't really compare the two; the 1164 is so much simpler from a technical point of view. I'm sure it will provide excellent timekeeping; it's rugged, reliable and has been on the market for decades but there's nothing fancy or even remotely exciting about the Valjoux-based caliber. The 3313 on the other hand, like all chronographs with a column wheel and vertical clutch, is a joy to handle. The precision in the start, stop and reset function is absolutely fabulous and this is where a chronograph controlled via a column wheel is vastly superior. Give it a go and you wont be able to go back to a non-column wheel chronograph ever again.

In the end, it's a question about your own interest in mechanical movements. If it's not that important, then go with the caliber 1164 but if you want a state-of-the-art chronograph with plenty to show off, then you'd better go with the 3313 or the 9300-series of movements.

Regards
Undersköterskan
 

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I am well aware of the 8500 single riveted wheel which is part of a different system. The 8500 hardly compares with the thinner plate 3313

Google the technical guide for the Omega 8500 movement. Under barrel bridge lubrication the same style riveted gear is shown. Maybe the 8500 needs to be avoided as well.
 

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Also, the abbreviation of "you are" is "you're."
That's a contraction, not an abbreviation. ;-) This thread is re-kindling my desire for an Aqua Terra Chrono. And I'd take a PO with the 3313 over the 7750-powered Seamaster Chrono every single day of the week and twice on Sunday. I'm not a 7750 hater - I have that movement (or derivatives) in 3 watches. But they are all at lower price points.
 
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