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Discussion Starter #1
I have serviced an old Omaga watch containing a 601 movement. When ready it works all right except that the second hand moves in an erratic way. I suspect the problem is a thin finger pointing att the pinion on the second hand arbour, acting as a brake. Am I right in this assumption? Looking through my notes i realise that I failed to note how this finger touches the pinion, i.e. their relative position. Does anyone know this? Should the point of contact be lubricated?

Lesson learned: always take careful notes. You never know what piece of information is important.
 

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The seconds pinion on that movement is not in the going train, so it isn't under constant (but mild) pressure. This is called "indirect seconds". Watches with indirect seconds are notorious for being jerky.

The "thin finger" is a tensioning spring, meant to make sure that there is always a tad of pressure on the seconds pinion. It is hard to get right. You want just enough pressure to make it move evenly, but not so much as to provide significant resistance.

I have an Omega with the cal. 285 that seems to do a staccato dance around the dial. I'm happy with that, and just let it be. It doesn't affect the timekeeping.

Best wishes,
Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Lubrication?

Thanks. I have changed the position of the spring, it had somehow been dislocated during the mounting of the cock above it. Now it runs much better, but not 100% OK. The question on lubrication remains. Should the tip be libricated, and if so with what type of oil/grease?
 

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Re: Lubrication?

Adjustment of the tension spring is difficult and it must not rub on the arbor. The tip of the spring should be a mirror polish to avoid any unnecessary friction. Oiling or not to oiling is a delicate question. Some argue if the spring and contact surface are well polished no oil is necessary - and improper oiling can lead to other problems. Others argue mirror polish and a touch of the lightest viscosity oil.
 

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Re: Lubrication?

Henry,
I concur with your post re perfect polishing. I use the tiniest amount of Bergeon quartz watch oil on the contact side of the spring. It is the lightest grade of watch oil available and perfectly suitable as it is made for use where there is no rotational torque being transferred by a wheel or pinion.
John
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Re: Lubrication?

Thanks all! The watch is gone now, so it seems that I need to get my hands on another one with a 600-series movement to experiment on.
 
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