WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

61 - 80 of 120 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,423 Posts
I agree. Out in the wild I’ve seen many Subs but never a Speedy. We live in the WUS bubble ;)
Out in the wild, there are actually way more Constellations (around half of all Omegas sold), while Seamasters (including the Aqua Terra), Planet Oceans all sell more than the Speedmaster Pro. The Speedy is a very niche watch, unlike a Submariner. WUS is an interesting bubble ;)

This is why I think it would make more sense for Omega to upmarket this line as they are obviously using it as their flag bearer despite it ironically being one of their cheapest watch. A Speedmaster should be more expensive given its brand, heritage, and iconic status. I would say $5-6000 would be a more reasonable price with 0 discounting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,423 Posts
double post >_<
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,928 Posts
If they are going to stop selling 1861, then I guess it will make more sense once they are able to get the NASA certification for 3861. Any whispers on that front?

As others have pointed out, very few among non-WIS/non-Space lore folks care for the 1861 SMP among the Omega line-up.
Getting a certification and bringing in a guns-blazing ad campaign may do the trick for the 3861 IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,390 Posts
If they are going to stop selling 1861, then I guess it will make more sense once they are able to get the NASA certification for 3861. Any whispers on that front?

As others have pointed out, very few among non-WIS/non-Space lore folks care for the 1861 SMP among the Omega line-up.
Getting a certification and bringing in a guns-blazing ad campaign may do the trick for the 3861 IMO.
I wonder if NASA will even bother though, and will it be the same test as in the past? I am guessing no.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,375 Posts
IMO this would be like Rolex killing the OP line i really don't see this happening and with the world economy hurt by a pandemic also the Speedmaster Pro is not their most affordable watch the SMP is priced lower.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,928 Posts
I wonder if NASA will even bother though, and will it be the same test as in the past? I am guessing no.
What I meant was (Omega's response to Jack Forster-Hodinkee's Question)

"If OMEGA decides in the future to discontinue the 1861, we can imagine subjecting the 3861 to the same NASA tests of 1965. These, however, would likely be undertaken independently by OMEGA in Switzerland, with the results being submitted to NASA. This would be the same method that NASA approved in 1978, when we tested our Alaska III prototypes containing the calibre 861 and sent the results to NASA."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,390 Posts
What I meant was (Omega's response to Jack Forster-Hodinkee's Question)

"If OMEGA decides in the future to discontinue the 1861, we can imagine subjecting the 3861 to the same NASA tests of 1965. These, however, would likely be undertaken independently by OMEGA in Switzerland, with the results being submitted to NASA. This would be the same method that NASA approved in 1978, when we tested our Alaska III prototypes containing the calibre 861 and sent the results to NASA."
right I get that but its not the same, part of the allure of the 1861 is that it was the actual movement (or a derivative of) the one which went through the real NASA tests, not just some mocked up tests done by omega and then rubber stamped by NASA.

Until Omega announces something I find it hard to believe they will do anything to the Hesalite pro model .... I know they have done some crazy and weird stuff, but it would be like them killing a big part of their history and I could see anyone interested in the NASA connection viewing this as a turnoff, I know it would for me. The space fanatics seem to be a pretty die hard group.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
I remember I could have gotten a Hesalite Speedy Pro from an EU AD for $3300 a few months ago. I wonder how hard I'm going to kick myself years from now for passing on that. Hopefully not very hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
I remember I could have gotten a Hesalite Speedy Pro from an EU AD for $3300 a few months ago. I wonder how hard I'm going to kick myself years from now for passing on that. Hopefully not very hard.

The Hesalite Speedmaster is next on my list and am starting to wonder the same thing..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
The Hesalite Speedmaster is next on my list and am starting to wonder the same thing..
It fell off the list for me a while back, after I got a Sinn 356. But if it's on your list I think now is a really good time to buy. Here are some thoughts on this from one of my favorite YouTube watch channels, JustBlueFish Watch Reviews.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,647 Posts
I see a lot more Subs than Speedmasters out in the wild. A lot of it depends on where you are located and what industry you work in.
It's funny. I've worked at 2 NASA centers for 30 years and I have seen 5 Speedmaster Professionals in that time. I've seen 5 Submariners a month it seems like. I don't doubt there are areas where people see lots of Speedmasters. You'd just think that in the communities around the space centers you'd see more of them, but I don't. And I look at what's on everyone's wrist.

Oh, and put me in the group that is skeptical of Omega ditching the basic Speedmaster. That's been their bellcow for years, and I was just reading somewhere where an Omega spokesman basically said the company owed it's business life to the Speedmaster, riding it through the quartz crisis and eleventy-seven different special editions. So I doubt they would drop that one. But I can absolutely see them adding another one....dozen editions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,647 Posts
If they are going to stop selling 1861, then I guess it will make more sense once they are able to get the NASA certification for 3861. Any whispers on that front?

As others have pointed out, very few among non-WIS/non-Space lore folks care for the 1861 SMP among the Omega line-up.
Getting a certification and bringing in a guns-blazing ad campaign may do the trick for the 3861 IMO.
NASA's not recertifying a mechanical Speedmaster. They are already obsolete in NASA stock though the Russians still issue them to cosmonauts and astronauts that fly through Russia (and that number of astronauts is about to go waaaaaaay down now that we have the capability to launch astronauts from KSC again - thanks SpaceX). FWIW, I suspect Russia issues Speedmasters because Omega pays them to do so. The Russians are great capitalists and never miss an opportunity to make a buck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
What impresses me is how silent omega has been about this, I wish they would've been like breitling this year and make debuts after debuts of insanely good pieces

Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,163 Posts
Could Omega still style a 3861-powered Speedmaster Pro "The Moonwatch"? I think that it's a stretch, is Omega really ready to drop the Moonwatch moniker?

Yes, the 1861 is different to the 321 - but it's pretty darn close.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
As far as the watch itself is concerned, it's inevitable that it will evolve. Heck, it already has! Otherwise it would still be a symmetrical case with 321 movement. Kudos to Omega for having kept it as close to the original as possible. It's really neat that while everyone else is releasing re-issues of older models and vintage-looking new models Omega has kept up with virtually the same formula. I look forward to see:
- 3861 movement (isn't it the co-axial version of the 1861 with silicon spring and hacking, otherwise the same?)
- Sapphire glass that is curved so it looks like the hesalite model and doesn't show the milky ring
- Ceramic bezel
- Still 42mm, asymmetrical case

As far as the 'moonwatch' part is concerned, that is trickier. Someone suggested that Omega could do the same original tests, and I'd be fine with that. Does NASA even qualify watches any more?? I'd be curious to learn more on this aspect if someone knows something. I know that the X-33 has the OK from NASA as well as nearly every G-Shock on the planet, but all pictures I've seen of astronauts doing an EVA the only watch I see is the Speedmaster. Is it possible that EVAs are still only possible with the speedy? That would be incredibly cool if it were true (in which case I would hope a hesalite version to continue to be on the menu.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
NASA's not recertifying a mechanical Speedmaster. They are already obsolete in NASA stock though the Russians still issue them to cosmonauts and astronauts that fly through Russia (and that number of astronauts is about to go waaaaaaay down now that we have the capability to launch astronauts from KSC again - thanks SpaceX). FWIW, I suspect Russia issues Speedmasters because Omega pays them to do so. The Russians are great capitalists and never miss an opportunity to make a buck.
This is a great point. If NASA agrees to certify a new Speedmaster, then I don't doubt Omega tries to make more money by introducing a new iteration. If NASA says no way, then I don't see Omega getting rid of that link to their space and moon mission heritage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,390 Posts
As far as the watch itself is concerned, it's inevitable that it will evolve. Heck, it already has! Otherwise it would still be a symmetrical case with 321 movement. Kudos to Omega for having kept it as close to the original as possible. It's really neat that while everyone else is releasing re-issues of older models and vintage-looking new models Omega has kept up with virtually the same formula. I look forward to see:
- 3861 movement (isn't it the co-axial version of the 1861 with silicon spring and hacking, otherwise the same?)
- Sapphire glass that is curved so it looks like the hesalite model and doesn't show the milky ring
- Ceramic bezel
- Still 42mm, asymmetrical case

As far as the 'moonwatch' part is concerned, that is trickier. Someone suggested that Omega could do the same original tests, and I'd be fine with that. Does NASA even qualify watches any more?? I'd be curious to learn more on this aspect if someone knows something. I know that the X-33 has the OK from NASA as well as nearly every G-Shock on the planet, but all pictures I've seen of astronauts doing an EVA the only watch I see is the Speedmaster. Is it possible that EVAs are still only possible with the speedy? That would be incredibly cool if it were true (in which case I would hope a hesalite version to continue to be on the menu.
According to this article: https://www.fratellowatches.com/speedmaster-became-moonwatch/

The 861 of which the 1861 is directly descended is the last movement NASA actually put through the tests themselves and certified.

Also it was noted above there was an interview with some Omega executives where they said if they do upgrade the movement then Omega would run the tests internally and submit the findings to NASA much like they did with the Alaska project Speedmasters.

Speaking for myself if they change the movement drastically to include a co axial and then certify it internally it won't be the same....part of the charm of the 1861 is that it is virtually identical to the movement (other than rhodium plating) which went though the actual tests that NASA performed...it was truly certified for space flight in a time when things were much different and these were actual tools to be used for an intended purpose.

Just making something that looks the same, but has totally different parts and then stamping on a certification just would be less special.
 
61 - 80 of 120 Posts
Top