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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
I’m tryingto collect some information about an old Omega pocket watch that belonged to mygreat grandfather.
It’s not inperfect condition but has a lot of sentimental value to us. The movement worksfine when you wind it up. The casing is in silver and is tamped with thetraditional 0,800 mark on inner cover. There are no stamps for swiss made so Igather it is fairly old. The number in the casing is 5539990 and the movement hasthe number 4787514. Could it be datedaround 1910? In the inner cover there is a hallmark on the left side of theomega hallmark which looks like a crown with the letter G beneath it. Does anyoneknow anything about this? I have tried to get this mark visible on thepictures. The clockwork is beautiful with nice wave patterens which I have notseen on any other omega pocket watches. There are also some other numbers on scribbledon the inside which I assume are dates of service maybe? I have Attached Pictures.

Anyinformation you might have on this item would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you
Kindregards
AlexanderAmundsen
 

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The movement dates to circa 1915, the case to something like 1920-1921... The higher serial is the one that counts, so I would say the entire watch was assembled and sold c. 1920.

The crescent moon and the crown is a German hallmark for silver.

The movement is a fairly typical Omega 19''' layout, the calibre number would have quite simply been its size in lignes (18''', 19''', etc.). Back then, Omega made these in 4 different grades, from A to D (A-lowest, D-highest). I don't think this one's necassarily a D, but the star regulator, the finishing on the bridges and the screwed chatons would suggest a fairly high grade, so my guess would be that it's either a C or D-grade. It's not quite as fancy as the American market "railroad chronometer" grades like CCR, CCCR, DR or DDR, not in terms of finishing, at least- but I don't think it falls far behind.

Pity about the badly chipped dial.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Hi mkws
Thank you very much for this information abut my Pocket watch. This was reall useful. Woul you recommend to have the watch serviced and the dial restored if possible? Do you have any idea of what this clock woud have retailed at in the 1920?
What is the value today? Do You have any sites where i could gather more information about the different grades?
This is very interresting.

Thank you very much

Kr

Alexander
 

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No valuations in this forum- it's explained in the rules.

No idea what would have been the retail price back then.

Here's an overview of the railroad grades:
Brandt11_zpsy6jznhlf.jpg
1915_P_W_Ellis_Toronto_Excerpt.jpg
Pics from the Internets.

The prices in the old adverts appear to be for the movement only.

Regarding a resource on the basic grades, there doesn't seem to be a good one anywhere online. Just takes looking at a lot of specimens, observing the differences. Generally, it's fairly easy to tell the difference between particular grades. The basic grade A would have had a simple regulator and "English frosting" finishing on the bridges, B- a better regulator, C and D were chronometers, so they were finished to a higher standard, and had all the fancy gimmicks- a nautilus or star (like your watch) regulator, screwed chatons, optionally also damaskeening (not necessarily, though).
Here's the entry in the Rafft archive- worth reading carefully:
bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements: Omega 19'''
Now, it obviously is for the earlier version, but the layout remains largely the same- yours would have been the modified version (made after 1911), so most likely the C and D grades would have received some sort of an "update."
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi again.

Thank you so much for sharing this information With me. I will have a thourough read through the documents you posted. I find these watches truly amazing. Apologies for valuation question. Was not aware of rule.
One last question to you as the expert. Would you recommend to try to restore the dial ? or leave it like it is? Is it even possible to repair a 100 year old dial?

Kind regards.

Alexander
 

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It is not nessesary to repair the dial. Just srew it from the movement and put it about 24 hours in dish water. The dark Hairlines will get unvisible. You don't see the rips but the dirt which come in by the time. This will be a perfect cosmetic result for the next 20-30 years and than you can use again precious water with detergent :)
Leave the broken part as they are. You can try to fix it with white colored Eopxyd but this needs some experience. Or look for a professional Dialrestorer in your country.

Regards Silke
 
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