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Discussion Starter #1
I was traveling for business and on the way to the airport passed a thrift store so I stopped. It was the best thrift store I have ever been in. I have never seen so many watches. Out of the pile I picked out the most amazing Omega for the unbelievable price of $20. It says it is not working but For the last hour has been working great. It appears to be a 1920s. I didn't believe you could find these at thrift stores! I am beside myself with glee.

I also picked up this excellent condition 1970s ladies Seiko automatic diver. It is also working fine

I also got this Phasar 2000 to go with my other two. I might try to get all six from 1976.
I'll Try to put more pictures up when I get home including movement shots.


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Whoa! Big score!

Don't run it too long without oiling it---that fellow is probably dry and grimy inside.
 

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The dial and hands don't look completely original, but hopefully it is an actual Omega movement and case. I assume that there was a typo and you didn't mean to say 1920s.
 

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Indeed looks like an old redial. And no, it's not from the 1920s. The design screams 1940s. The font, the quality of which is really not bad by the standards that redialers used to have quite a few decades ago, looks like the one used in the 1950s, and yet is somehow similar to the 1960s one. So I'd guess that's when it was redialed.

Still, while that's bad news, I think that for $20 there is little to complain, if it does turn out to be a legit Omega case and movement. Guess it might be good material for a project watch. Should you be contemplating a re-redial, I think you could have a look at Tim Mackrain's restoration work that he does on Omegas, as he usually gets the font and minute track alignment right.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
sorry to bring it to you but that omega is a redial. i'm really curious what movement is inside.
It looks like it will be tomorrow before I can open the case as it's pretty hard to find something to use in an airport. Lol.


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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
The dial and hands don't look completely original, but hopefully it is an actual Omega movement and case. I assume that there was a typo and you didn't mean to say 1920s.
I kind of figured it might be a redial. And yes I meant to say 1940s. I can't wait to get this thing opened. I suspect it is a 30T2 reference 2214 based on this eBay auction.



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It might be a very similar dial style, but it's quite definitely not the same reference- notice the very different lugs on both watches. The reference number indicates a particular case design, to which a particular movement (sometimes also its derivatives, if the movement was "updated", but the reference was not discontinued or a differently priced version was also offered) is assigned.
 
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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Here are the movement pics. The movement is marked 26.5 T6. The case serial number starts with 101xxxxxx indicating around 1944 but the movement starts with a 9xxxxx so probably earlier from what I can tell. What do you think?



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Very nice find, my dad found a lovely cal. 265 for under 30$ recently - he just had it serviced. There is stuff out there, just a matter of digging it up:)
 

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I don't know why the case-back doesn't have a reference number
Quite simply because case reference numbers were introduced on a full scale circa 1945-1947. They started to gradually replace the case serials with reference numbers circa 1943-1944.

Previously, Omega used case serials, following the very same system as the movement serials.

The higher serial is the one that matters, so it was made in 1944. The movement comes from an earlier batch (1941-1942?), which was pretty normal for Omega, and generally widespread in mass-produced watches by any brand. Same story with Tissot, Bulova...
 

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Omega was noted for having hands of that style in the 1930's, not the 1940's. Could be that they were replaced at one time. However anything is possible with vintage Omega.

Also, crystal is distorting the view of the dial in the first picture. Very difficult to tell if original or redial.

Nice buy,
gatorcpa
 

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Omega was noted for having hands of that style in the 1930's, not the 1940's.
Nope. Introduced in the very late 1930s (1938/1939)? Possibly. Typical of that period, for Omega? No. Most specimens with "pontife" hands seem to date from the early to mid 1940s.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Nope. Introduced in the very late 1930s (1938/1939)? Possibly. Typical of that period, for Omega? No. Most specimens with "pontife" hands seem to date from the early to mid 1940s.
Here are some close up photos of the dial.



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Discussion Starter #19
Here are the movement pics. The movement is marked 26.5 T6. The case serial number starts with 101xxxxxx indicating around 1944 but the movement starts with a 9xxxxx so probably earlier from what I can tell. What do you think?



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I have one correction. After looking for a caliber 265 T6 and not finding it online I double checked and it is marked 265 T3. That makes more sense now. Also a comment was made about the lugs not being faceted but they are faceted. See photo.



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The ref 2165 has chamfered lugs like yours, with bevels, not facets. The ref you showed had faceted lugs where the lug bent into two facets along its length.
 
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