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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never owned a non-hacking auto but am thinking of buying a blue mako or some other 469 model. Strangely I can't seem to find the answer to this simple question anywhere: does pulling out the crown to adjust the time stop the minute and hour hands? I ask this because, for my hacking Seiko 5 which runs a little fast, i simply pull out the crown for 15 seconds or so every few days to keep it good time. I wonder if i could do the same thing with a non-hacking movement? That way even though the seconds will be off, i can maintain a degree of precision without "back-hacking", a practice which I'm a little apprehensive of.

Also, for those of you who have owned these watches for a number of years, how does the accuracy hold up? I know that accuracy tends to decrease over time, i just don't know how much, generally speaking.

Thank you for your time and insight.
 

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For non hacking watches
Like the one you want to buy
,you have to take it off your wrist and place it crown up - down to make it slow a bit ...
,face up ( or down in my case) to make it a bit faster...
From my experience after a good 2-3 months of continuous function
The watch may get a bit slow...
After regulation ,if needed ,the watch's accuracy is good -5/+10 the most...
The only thing that seems to change the accuracy is temperature ..
Winter is a bit slow summer is faster...
I own Seiko and orients
My experience is based on these brands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the tips! But, out of curiosity, DO the minute and hour hands stop moving upon pulling the crown out?
 

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*snip*

Also, for those of you who have owned these watches for a number of years, how does the accuracy hold up? I know that accuracy tends to decrease over time, i just don't know how much, generally speaking.

*snip*
had my Mako for 2 years, runs on average +3 s/d (I haven't measured it on a daily basis only on a weekly) and been doing so consistently after the movement "set" after the first 2-3 weeks of usage.
 

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I dont think there's any watch out there on which the second hand would stop and others keep moving, wouldnt make much sense. Other than those "intelligent quartz" pieces where the second hand might momentarily be used to display something else, some Timex models come to mind. So no, definitely doesnt stop on any automatics , they are always geared up together so if one stops, all stop. The only exception is when setting the time, in which case the second hand does not get engaged, it either stops where it is for a "hacking" movement or it keeps going while you set it with a non-hacking. We all know that you can use slight pressure on crown in the opposite direction of setting to "hack" the hand , sometimes it will slip backwards a bit. This won't work on ALL watches but it will work on many, just remember to do it before starting to wind for a hand-winding piece as it will not work on a fully charged movement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you guys! In light of this, for those of you who have non hacking autos that run fast but are wary of back-hacking, how do you prefer to keep them on time? Is the only alternative to completely reset the time and date (clockwise) periodically? Or I suppose you could have it regulated to run a little slow so you would only ever have to advance the hands...I'm not necessarily opposed to back-hacking, I just wonder about potentially healthier alternatives to keep the minute hand more or less on time, disregarding seconds
 

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I have so many watches so as long as the time deviation is +-10 s/d or less i don't care since I rarley wear a watch more than 3 weeks in a row and a time off-set within 5 min is totally acceptable for me before I reset the watch. And when I'm not wearing the watch I let it run out untill the next time I use it. This means I have to reset it anyway.

And to be compleatly honest, if precise time keeping is of importance get a quartz. The best mechanical watch is still worse off in that department compared to the worst quartz watch.
 

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Right overnight positioning is a great tool to keep a good mechanical watch within +/- 1 second per MONTH. That can be even more accurate than a quartz.
 

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I also had this question as everything you read about non-hacking just says that the second hand doesn't stop. However, I just got a Seiko 5 with the 7S26 movement, which is non-hacking and discovered that all of the hands continue moving when the crown is out. In my opinion, describing a non-hacking movement as not stoping the second hand is misleading because it implies that the second hand is the only one that isn't stopped. This may be obvious to aficionados, but it is an unclear answer to novices who are likely the people asking the question.
 

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I have so many watches so as long as the time deviation is +-10 s/d or less i don't care since I rarley wear a watch more than 3 weeks in a row and a time off-set within 5 min is totally acceptable for me before I reset the watch. And when I'm not wearing the watch I let it run out untill the next time I use it. This means I have to reset it anyway.

And to be compleatly honest, if precise time keeping is of importance get a quartz. The best mechanical watch is still worse off in that department compared to the worst quartz watch.
I keep my automatics always wound.
I don't like the idea of unscrew and screw the crown every time I rotate it...
I made a watch winder that can hold up to 8 watches...
 
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