WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Gday folks

Hello Mods, if this is in the wrong sub-forum I apologise and would appreciate you moving it to the right place?

My wife's Orient automatic has had a few markers fall off the dial and they are floating around. I'd like to try my hand at fixing this but the extent of my skills up until now has been battery replacement.

Can anyone suggest the tools/equipment I'll need to repair this issue? I already have the basics to open the watch up. I'm just unsure of glue type, glue applicator etc.
Any other tips hints and suggestions are very welcome.

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,871 Posts
Scribbler...Hello!

I've done this type of repair several times, and I've learned that it is best accomplished by: removing the dial / placing the marker in its holes ( all the watches I've worked on use markers with two pins that go into holes...I daresay that there may be other designs ! ) / applying a small dab of crystal cement to the back of the dial where the pins set / wait a few minutes / VOILA!

It IS possible to affix markers without removing the dial, using an appropriate adhesive ( as above, I use crystal cement ( not the UV variety! ). I like "L&R Precision Cement", although my tube is several years old...I do not know if it's still made, but there are other cements just like it.

It is also possible to use cyanoacrylates ( 'Super Glue' ) and not remove the dial, but I have had poor luck here: it is difficult to hold the marker(s), it is difficult to apply 'just' the right amount of adhesive / the adhesive tends to leave a whitish film around the repair which ruins the look of the dial.

In all cases, you will need a loupe and good, fine tweezers. Having a little "Rodico" around is always a plus: it's an inexpensive, Swiss-made, putty-like substance that removes fingerprints & oil & debris from many surfaces, and most (all?!) Watchmakers use it all the time. Do be careful, though: it can yank markers off the dial, and pull the paint out of filled engravings on movements...still, with a just a little care, it is harmless, and a GREAT addition to any bench.

Finally: from what I'm sensing in your Post, I respectfully suggest that you leave this to someone who's done it before...it's an easy job, but one that--if not done 'just so'--can ruin an otherwise nice dial!

Michael.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Scribbler...Hello!

I respectfully suggest that you leave this to someone who's done it before...it's an easy job, but one that--if not done 'just so'--can ruin an otherwise nice dial!

Michael.
Thank you for the tips, i appreciate it.

Regarding your final advice. I hear ya! But this was a budget watch that my wife has given up on so it's a learning project for me. If I don't pull it off it will only be my ego that is hurt.
Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
Try to avoid adhesives with volatil compound so as CA . If not strongly ventilated the vapors recrystalize in the movement and so affect the surface on surface conditions of gears and such.. i prefer epoxi, applied from the backside in the way rhe positioning holes are filled without protrusion. Then the resin is pused back to the back while coating pin and hole . Residuals are removedwith a razor blade like with a specle pumping a small amount of resin into the gap between pin and dial.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top