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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've owned my Oris BC3 for over two years now. I admit it's one of the cheaper models within the brand, so I believe I have an appropriate level of expectation from the watch. The watch is durable and clean, and I think the see through case back adds a nice touch to the watch.

Anyways, the reason for this post is that I have been finding that my Oris on some days (quite frequent than I would like/expect), can't last through the night (like this morning, the watch died at 5am). I wear the watch daily (office desk job), and will take it off around 6pm, depending on when I leave work (either at home or gym).

Is this normal? The power reserve of 38 hours seems to only work when I wind the watch. I don't remember ever hitting a lengthy power reserve, even when I wear the watch and am actively moving for most of the day (walking/traveling/etc).

I always equated the low power reserve on this watch to its lower price and that I may just not be using an automatic watch correctly. I may just need a lesson on charging the watch through more active movement.

Your advice is much appreciated!
 

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It may be a function of not enough movement during the day - sometimes desk work isn't enough to fully wind the watch. But it might be an issue with the rotor not spinning properly to charge the watch.

You might check if the watch is still under warranty - I know you could get an extended warranty if you registered the watch through the website. If not, have a local watch maker check it out.

I have a BC3 I bought in 2001 and it still stays running even if I wear it 4 or 5 days in a row.

Chris
 

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I believe the BC3 runs a SW220-1 movement and lets just say that some of them aren't red hot at converting wrist movement into watch charge. With a desk job you may just not be charging the watch enough for it to last through the night. My Titan with the same movement would stop just the same and I got into the habit of taking it off and giving it a gentle twirl each evening just to put some extra juice in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I believe the BC3 runs a SW220-1 movement and lets just say that some of them aren't red hot at converting wrist movement into watch charge. With a desk job you may just not be charging the watch enough for it to last through the night. My Titan with the same movement would stop just the same and I got into the habit of taking it off and giving it a gentle twirl each evening just to put some extra juice in it.
Thank you for the feedback! I suspected the SW220-1 wasn't all that impressive. And I'm not complaining, for the price, I think Oris watches are nice, good value watches.

I'll have a better idea of expectations as I expand my automatic watch collection. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It may be a function of not enough movement during the day - sometimes desk work isn't enough to fully wind the watch. But it might be an issue with the rotor not spinning properly to charge the watch.

You might check if the watch is still under warranty - I know you could get an extended warranty if you registered the watch through the website. If not, have a local watch maker check it out.

I have a BC3 I bought in 2001 and it still stays running even if I wear it 4 or 5 days in a row.

Chris
Thank you for the thoughts! I do suspect my desk job doesn't generate enough movement.
 

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Patek Philippe 5960P, Grand Seiko SBGM221, Rolex Exp II Polar, Omega FOIS, JLC Reverso, AP 11.59
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The winding mechanism of the SW220-1 is identical to the ETA equivalent. There's nothing wrong with it (apart from Sellita having less well made reversing wheels which manifests by the rotor spinning when winding) so it's not that it's not impressive at all, it's just what it is. If not moving around much during the day then it won't be winding the mainspring so the best thing is to manually wind around 20-30 full turns of the crown every couple of days.


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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The winding mechanism of the SW220-1 is identical to the ETA equivalent. There's nothing wrong with it (apart from Sellita having less well made reversing wheels which manifests by the rotor spinning when winding) so it's not that it's not impressive at all, it's just what it is. If not moving around much during the day then it won't be winding the mainspring so the best thing is to manually wind around 20-30 full turns of the crown every couple of days.

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Thank you! Can one possibly over wind too much? I remember reading somewhere that winding more than 15 turns would be bad. Or there is a limit where you can break the spring...
 

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Thank you! Can one possibly over wind too much? I remember reading somewhere that winding more than 15 turns would be bad. Or there is a limit where you can break the spring...
No, all automatic movts have a clutch type mechanism that prevents overwinding. A manual wind only movt can be overwound but takes quite a force to overcome the noticeable stop when fully wound.


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The hand winding mechanisms on autos aren't as robust as hand winders so hand winding them a lot can sometimes lead to problems.
 

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The hand winding mechanisms on autos aren't as robust as hand winders so hand winding them a lot can sometimes lead to problems.
Yes and no. ETA make HW versions of their 2824's that are absolutely identical apart from the automatic winding bridge and rotor. Given the smaller sized mainspring it's not difficult to break it if overwinding compared to a much larger and stronger movt such as an ETA6497

Sellita however have very poorly made reversing wheels on their SW200 version of the 2824 which often fail resulting in the rotor spinning when winding at best and at worst, if both wheels fail, can then strip the winding wheel teeth!


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I have several ETA2824 powered watches that I regularly hand wind without issue for several years now, but a Sellita powered watch that has had the exact problem I mentioned above after only a year.


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