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My Citizen Eco Drive gave up the ghost a couple of days ago, and I an old Oris Pointer Date watch out of my sock drawer. I bought it off of EBay 7 or 8 years ago, and when banished to to the sock drawer was that the hour and the minute hand are out of sync - when the minute hand is at 12:00, the hour hand between two numbers. Right now, the minute hand is on the 12, and the hour hand is halfway between 9 and 10 ( where it should be if it was 9:30).

The hour hand isn’t flopping around loose - it’s just not synchronized. I vague recall mailing it to a watch repair shop right after the problem became apparent, and he said that that was to be expected in an old watch.

It’s an attractive watch - a little small 33mm diameter, and I can read the date because the are at the circumeference.

From that vague description is is possible to guess how much it will cost to repair it? At least in the ballpark? It wasn’t a particularly expensive watch, but I sort of like it.

If the respair was $100, I would do it in a heartbeat.

I’d probably pause at $150, and for $200, I would really want to know that it was likely to keep functioning for a number of years.

I have attached a picture of the watch.
 

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If I am understanding you correctly, it is just a simple and inexpensive adjustment to align the hands correctly. However, one might ask how this situation came to be in the first place. Is one of the hands loose on its post? Are the hands are interfering with each other? If so, then your watchmaker can re-align the hands, but the problem will recur.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If I am understanding you correctly, it is just a simple and inexpensive adjustment to align the hands correctly. However, one might ask how this situation came to be in the first place. Is one of the hands loose on its post? Are the hands are interfering with each other? If so, then your watchmaker can re-align the hands, but the problem will recur.
Thanks - I don’t think they are loose or colliding. My wife is going to take it to a jewelry store tomorrow that has a huge watch repair business. I don’t think that they sell Oris, but maybe they will be able to fix it relatively inexpensively.
 

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I would not recommend taking it to a jewelry store with a huge watch repair business; in fact, that's the last place I would take it. I strongly recommend that you find an independent watchmaker.
 

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I would not recommend taking it to a jewelry store with a huge watch repair business; in fact, that's the last place I would take it. I strongly recommend that you find an independent watchmaker.
I agree, the hands also have to be set so the cal changes at 12 midnight... nice watch
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I agree, the hands also have to be set so the cal changes at 12 midnight... nice watch
I like it. But I am also thinking about badbackdan’s point - what cause the hands to get out of sync? It seem like it would take a mechanical failure of some sort - it’s hard to imagine enough force being applied to the hands or something somewhere else in the mechanism to cause the gears to jump a few teeth or anything like that. Something must have caused this issue.
 

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I like it. But I am also thinking about badbackdan’s point - what cause the hands to get out of sync? It seem like it would take a mechanical failure of some sort - it’s hard to imagine enough force being applied to the hands or something somewhere else in the mechanism to cause the gears to jump a few teeth or anything like that. Something must have caused this issue.
Last watchmaker guy was drunk.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The watch repair man adjusted the hands for free, and took a look at the movement. He said that the “key pinion” (or “key and pinion” - I am getting this second hand - I didn’t take it to the store) were worn, and the watch was pretty likely to stop working in the next couple of years. He said that servicing the movement would cost $375, and that would include replacing the key pinion. I didn’t think it was worth that much to me - the watch is a little small for my taste, and I think that makes more sense to me to see if I can find a 38mm or larger Oris Pointer Date on eBay and purchase that.
 

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He said that servicing the movement would cost $375, and that would include replacing the key pinion.
Wonder if that watchmaker would care to recommend the variety of weed that he's smoking, because that valuation sounds quite delusional.
 

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Crazy price for that. Look for a genuine watch repairer. These jewelry stores mostly send them to one and then charge you for their cut.
 
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He said that servicing the movement would cost $375, and that would include replacing the key pinion.
Wonder if that watchmaker would care to recommend the variety of weed that he's smoking, because that valuation sounds quite delusional.
Actually, that’s not far off of the other prices I hear around here (Raleigh, NC)?

Do you have other recommendations?

The indendent watchmaker who told the non-synchronized hands might be expected in a watch of this age charges $250 to service a movement.

Are there trustworthy online watch repair businesses?
 

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You should just wear it and see if it grows on you. If you decide you like it, you can probably get it serviced for half the amount that was quoted. Otherwise put it on eBay.
 

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hmmmm the old key and pinion story...
Care to tell this tale to those of us not in the know? :) Or do you prefer to remain enigmatic as you are succinct and wry in your responses? ;)

I am familiar with pinions for the pallet, balance, center through fourth wheels and escapement and with keyless works... no clue what a key pinion is (guessing something was lost in translation).

I don't know what areas typically wear out first.

Sent from my Timex Sinclair 1000 using Tapatalk
 

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Actually, that’s not far off of the other prices I hear around here (Raleigh, NC)?

Do you have other recommendations?

The indendent watchmaker who told the non-synchronized hands might be expected in a watch of this age charges $250 to service a movement.

Are there trustworthy online watch repair businesses?
I don't think the poor synchronization of hands has anything to do with age, more likely with previous service done badly.

For a fairly simple pin-lever movement (most Oris movements had a pin-lever escapement), 250 for a basic service sounds absolutely ridiculous, and if the prices elsewhere were similar, then it may be a combination of bad luck and high local average service rates.

Maybe you should look up a few other independents in another city, or in another state. It may be, that even sending it over to a watchmaker in a region with lower average prices for servicing will cost you less than having it serviced where you live.

I'm on the other side of the pond, so I can't help you much with US-based watchmakers.
 

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My watch repairer, also not in the US so therefore maybe not a fair comparison, typically charges me the equivalent of about $35.00 for a service. When he can be bothered to shift his a**e, that is.

However, anecdotally, I believe that States-side services can cost way less than you've been quoted, so maybe you should at least consider @mkws's advice.

Regards.
 

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My watch repairer, also not in the US so therefore maybe not a fair comparison, typically charges me the equivalent of about $35.00 for a service. When he can be bothered to shift his a**e, that is.

However, anecdotally, I believe that States-side services can cost way less than you've been quoted, so maybe you should at least consider @mkws's advice.
$35 is a phenomenal price, no wonder you're able to maintain such a large collection of interesting watches. I don't think you could find a price that good in the US; even $100 would be cheap, especially for a watch with all the date complications.

However, after reading this thread, my feeling is that the OP probably should not invest further in this watch, since it is already running and he isn't crazy about the size. It makes more sense for him to sell it and buy a watch that he will be happier with.
 

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Jeez, you guys in the States have it good with servicing costs!

Given the paucity of watchmakers in Australia (particularly independent ones), the cheapest I’ve been charged for a manual wind was A$140 (which I’m likely to take back to another watchmaker I’m using now for him to see if he can re-regulate it). The most expensive for my current daily wearer was A$330 for full service, new Plexi, crown, mainspring and relume-ing hands and dial.

Cheapest service for an auto day-date (ETA 2879) I had done was A$270 (and I’m going to take that one again back to my new watchmaker for re-regulation and also a potential change of the mainspring as I’m getting low amplitude readings from my timegrapher app on my iPhone).


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