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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi- I recently purchased a new Ocean Vintage Red and love it. I've already worn it in the ocean.

I noticed that the first few days it kept incredibly accurate time, perhaps running a second or two fast after four days. Then, sometime during the following week it went from running fast to slow, coinciding with a bike ride. After 24 hours, it dropped two seconds, and after two days it was 7 seconds slower and now after 4 days it's off 11 seconds.

is it normal for one of these 2824-2 elabore movements to slow down 11 seconds in 4 days? At those rate it will be a minute behind in 2 weeks. This could very well be the norm, and I have no issue with resetting the time, but perhaps the movement needs adjusting after I rode my bike to work on some rough road?

Appreciate any insights.
 

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11 seconds in 4 days is well within COSC spec. I'd take that any day.


Sent from my [redacted] using Tapatalk
 

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While -11 seconds in 4 days is certainly acceptable, I'm more concerned with it being so erratic.
There are many factors to take into consideration when timing a watch. The biggest factor is Position when you take it off at night.

But to be on the safe side, take the watch to a local watchmaker and tell him you want him to regulate the movement. Let him know what you've experienced and let him have the watch for about a week.

Sometimes when a movement is erratic it can be something as small as a special of dust inside the movement. Let him thoroughly check the movement and regulate it.
Also ask him to adjust it on the plus side rather than the negative.
I personally hate when a watch I own loses time. If it runs a few seconds fast that is OK because I'd rather be a few minutes early than a few minutes late.

PS... I also don't think it has anything to do with the bike ride and is purely coincidental. The movement has a shock protection system which protects it from accidental drops and such. The vibration from a bike ride while the watch is on your wrist should have no effect on the watch.
 

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good timekeeping,
My apollon is + 6 to + 8 sec per day.
 
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From your narrative, your watch is new and has been ticking for a few days only. Give it a few weeks for all the parts of the movement to operate smoothly, when new very tiny imperfections in the manufacturing can interfere with the accuracy.

Less than 3 second per day is great anyway!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow, great info and perspective. Thanks everyone.

JSal- what position do you normally leave your watch after you remove for the evening? I just leave mine facing up on my night stand. Thanks again
 

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Wow, great info and perspective. Thanks everyone.

JSal- what position do you normally leave your watch after you remove for the evening? I just leave mine facing up on my night stand. Thanks again
Generally Face Up as that usually causes a + gain in time.
 

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+1

And to add, aside from positional variance, the state of wind can have an effect on the timekeeping of the watch.

Get a proper time source, like Time.gov or an atomic watch and set your watch to one of those. Wind it fully or make sure that it is wound from a full day's activity and then check the watch after 24 hours. Then, hack to to the time source once again and use your normal wearing patter for about 5 days or so and then check the watch again and divide by amount of hours that you've worn the watch for this deviation.

At that point, see how it all turns out. Note that there are apps to check the timing of your watch. Hairspring looks to be a great new one that is available. That's another thing to play with regarding accuracy. :)

Some movements can be "regulated" to a degree based on the position that you leave the watch when it's off of your wrist. Try dial up, dial down, crown up, crown down, etc. to see if you can gain any time back when it's off of our wrist.

Lastly, if you end up having it regulated or attempt to do it yourself, you will void the warranty. If you purchased it new from Steinhart, for the duration of the warranty, only Steinhart can service the watch or the warranty will be void so treat with caution. If the watch is technically "in spec" for the movement, (and yours is) the manufacturer will not usually regulate it under warranty.

From your narrative, your watch is new and has been ticking for a few days only. Give it a few weeks for all the parts of the movement to operate smoothly, when new very tiny imperfections in the manufacturing can interfere with the accuracy.

Less than 3 second per day is great anyway!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone for the useful information, especially about voiding the warranty if I took it to a watchmaker!

Here is an update:

I left it face up for another few nights and it continued to lose time, about a second each night. However, I followed the advice of EHV and positioned it crown up one night. It gained a second! I did this two more nights and by day 4 it had caught up. What this tells me is I can manually regulate the OVR's accuracy by placing it face up to slow it down or crown up on its side to speed it up. It just took a little while to figure out the watch's idiosyncrasies.

Thanks again for the insights.
 

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The beauty of the mechanical watch movement is that it requires regular interaction between it & the user. Every mech movement is different & that is part of the charm.

Thanks everyone for the useful information, especially about voiding the warranty if I took it to a watchmaker!

Here is an update:

I left it face up for another few nights and it continued to lose time, about a second each night. However, I followed the advice of EHV and positioned it crown up one night. It gained a second! I did this two more nights and by day 4 it had caught up. What this tells me is I can manually regulate the OVR's accuracy by placing it face up to slow it down or crown up on its side to speed it up. It just took a little while to figure out the watch's idiosyncrasies.

Thanks again for the insights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Here is an update.

For the past few weeks, I've been losing 3 seconds during the day only to make it up at night by placing the crown in the up position, keeping the time within 1-2 seconds. Very good IMO. Then about 1 week ago, I noticed I lost like 9 seconds in one day. I put it in the crown up position, but instead of gainiing 1.5 seconds as it had been doing in that position it lost 1.5 seconds. I tried all the other positions at night , but to no avail. It kept losing time at night.

I reset the time 2-3 days ago and it has fallen behind by about 17 seconds. I can't seem to offset the daily drift at night anymore. I am beginning to wonder if the bike riding vibrations are beginning to take their toll.

Wonderimg if it's worth sending to Steinhart for an adjustment.

thoughts?
 

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I doubt the vibrations had anything to do with it. It's on your wrist while you are riding. It's not being banged around.
You can have a local watchmaker regulate the watch for very little cost and you'll have your watch back much quicker.

Maybe you should have the watchmaker look for something like a spec of dust or dirt which would explain the erratic operation of the watch.
 

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This erratic accuracy is not normal... This watch must return to the factory to be controlled and regulated correctly !
Variances in so-called accuracy can be effected - among many other things - by the amount of power reserve a watch has, so it seems like jumping the gun to tell someone that it has to be returned to the factory before first getting some idea of how long the watch is being worn on a daily basis, and thereby estimating what kind of power reserve the movement is working from. The OP hadn't even given the watch a chance to 'break in' - as some here have suggested - before posting his concerns about its accuracy. I suppose we should blame the WIS environment for creating this hypersensitivity to accuracy when the only thing that matters is how it keeps time, on average, and only when it's well outside of the movement manufacturer's specs should it become a servicing concern.
 

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These are not chronometer. 2-3 days with 17 seconds slow that is about -6 per day. That is very good compare to chronometer that is rated -4/+6 per day average over 10 days. If you want to be super anal about the accuracy, follow the test in COSC.
Don't wear the watch in the next fifteen days. Wind the watch fully every day at the same time, open the spreadsheet in Excel. You probably can't do the temperature testing, but substitute with the room temperature in the house for all tests. I bet you would be surprise how accurate your steinhart is.
Do not reset the watch every day to match time.gov time. Let the differences carry on for the next fifteen days. However, you should still document the differences daily when you wind the watch, so you know which position to rest the watch to compensate the daily changes. At the end of the testing you can divide the number of days to get the average daily rate.

You probably can tell that I am also super anal about the watch accuracy.

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Appreciate all the excellent feedback and tips. I guess I fall into the anal group!

Suffice it to say, the OVR, a lovely and solid watch, is back at Steinhart HQ for servicing. It was losing 12 seconds day, but I could not make up for daily drift at night. I tried all off wrist positions, but to no avail. It confused to lose time until I was over a minute behind after 5 days.

I got an automated message from after sales saying I should expect it in 4-5 weeks. I certainly hope it doesnt it doesn't take this long. Probably just the standard reply. Anyone receive this message when they returned their watch for repair but ended up getting it back sooner?
 
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