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Thank you very much for the photo of the mvmt! I have looked for hours and came up short. You have a dead ringer to this one. Looks like its real? Smelly and dirty enough to be original. Junk shop find in Wisconsin! How did it get there?!!!!
 

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Thank you very much for the photo of the mvmt! I have looked for hours and came up short. You have a dead ringer to this one. Looks like its real? Smelly and dirty enough to be original. Junk shop find in Wisconsin! How did it get there?!!!!
It looks convincing, I would probably have it checked out by an expert before consideirng any restoration work though.
 

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It's definitely legitimate. Go save it from the junk store.
 

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Ok something I've been wondering about, the screws in the balance wheel.
It seems self explanatory that these are put in place to balance the balance wheel, the same way that car tyres are done.
But why do some manufacturers do it and others don't?
Even some relatively high end movements don't seem to have it.

I don't understand why that balance wheel on the Patek pictured is just covered in screws, surely thats detrimental as they've used so many?
 

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Ok something I've been wondering about, the screws in the balance wheel.
It seems self explanatory that these are put in place to balance the balance wheel, the same way that car tyres are done.
But why do some manufacturers do it and others don't?
Even some relatively high end movements don't seem to have it.

I don't understand why that balance wheel on the Patek pictured is just covered in screws, surely thats detrimental as they've used so many?
These screws, in addition to balancing (or poising) the balance wheel, are also used to adjust the moment of inertia of the balance wheel. This is important for movements that have free-sprung balances, as opposed to index regulated balances, changing the moment of inertia is the only watch to change the rate of the movement. Cheaper modern movements tend not to have these as the poising is done by using a laser to remove parts of the balance wheel, and the rate is regulated using the index.
 
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When you say rate you mean beats per hour?
Amazing.
Well, I was referring it the accuracy of the movement, but they're all related of course. Adjusting the moment of inertia changes the frequency (or equivalently the beats per hour) of the oscillation of the balance wheel, and increasing the beat rate results in a watch that runs faster.
 
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