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Does this watch look authentic? Could it actually be from 1894? I am new to Pateks and trying to learn as much as possible.

Thank you in advance for your time.

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It could be from that vintage, but I'm not a patek expert.... The wrist watch gained popularity during wwi. Often times the lugs were soldered on to a pocket watch as looks to be the case here.
 

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To my "quick and dirty" glance at the photos, the movement doesn't appear to be a PP one. Why? Well, for one thing, it doesn't seem to say "Patek Philippe & Co. Geneve" anywhere on it. I think too that PP typically used a print rather than cursive font in engraving their name on a bridge of the movement.





The pics above are from here: https://www.1stdibs.com/creators/patek-philippe-and-co/jewelry/watches/pocket-watches/ .

It is possible that the piece does have authentic PP elements, however. The dial could indeed be an authentic PP one as might be parts of the case. Strangely, however, there appears to be no watchmaker's engraved info on the inside of the caseback. That's highly unusual for a case purporting to be from 1894, unless the caseback were replaced, but replacing a caseback, though not impossible or 100% improbable, is very uncommon in the course of repairing watches as the caseback consists of no moving parts and would have to have been very, very badly damaged to have needed replacing.

The other thing is that I don't know (i.e., awareness one way or the other) that PP actually made men's wristwatches in 1894, much less any or many that have survived outside of museum quality collections. PP, on the other hand had by that time begun making ladies' wristwatches. That's important because culturally among the upper classes, the folks who bought PP watches, wristwatches were decoratively functional novelties and shunned (along with their male wearers) by "men of distinction." My general recollection of wristwatch history reminds me that the Boer War is largely what catalyzed the development of men's wristwatches, and that solely for practical reasons, but once that happened, the proverbial "cat was out of the bag" and the rest is, as we say, history. That story and set of extancies suggest to me that what you have pictured might be a modified pocket watch rather than a purpose built wristwatch.

Though the lack of Geneva striping, all but required on a modern PP watch, may strike some as being odd, for 19th century watch movements, their absence alone isn't telling.

Lastly, I doubt both the hands are authentically PP. I've never seen a watch from them that didn't have a minute hand that didn't fully reach the chapter ring of hour numerals, if not the outer chapter ring of hour or minute markers. There again, it appears the watch is some sort of cobbled together assemblage of parts, the dial and inner case back perhaps being authentically PP, and the others questionably so.

All the best.
 
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