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Discussion Starter #1
Patina is one of those subjects that can cause anger in many circles. And it's also a somewhat misused term; by definition it refers to surface discoloration occuring due to the various factors associated with ageing, so it doesn't really apply to "Damage". And while sometimes it can be aesthetically pleasing, in other cases it can be highly detrimental to the item (iron oxide being a good example).

At any rate, I picked up this relic of the jewel wars of early 60's the other day. Lots of "Patina".
DSC_9467.JPG

Its on the medium-high end of the absurd as far as jewel counts go; there were higher counts out there, but most retailers tried to keep it in the 30-40 range.

I was torn on if I should try to clean the dial. This is a hit or miss activity at the best of times; but after a bit of gentle cleaning (q-tip and saliva to start), it seemed that this particular variant is some combination of old laquer and possibly nicotine. Turned out rather nice:

DSC_9478.JPG

Its always scary trying to clean these; one wrong move and the dial is ruined. But when it works, the results can be great!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looks great! By "self winding" I guess they mean automatic but what is meant by "solar"?
"Solar" was one of the house brands of T. Eatons of Canada (a mail order department store similar to Sears). They started using "Solar" back in the 20's or so, when it simply referenced the sun (which is the source of much of our concept of time) and not "solar power" as we know it today.
 

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I agree "patina" is a badly used word, a bit like "mint"

In my opinion your dial was distressed, nothing to do with 'patina; a beautiful natural aging
a
 
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But seeing as Eaton's also used to retail Rolex under their own name ('Solar Aqua,' to name just one, as we've previously discussed), I'm fascinated to know whose movement was used in this incarnation of the Solar name. And whatever did those jewels do on the minute wheel, aside from add to the count? Was the idea that they might have acted as bearing surfaces, and reduced friction in some way?

"Solar" was one of the house brands of T. Eatons of Canada (a mail order department store similar to Sears). They started using "Solar" back in the 20's or so, when it simply referenced the sun (which is the source of much of our concept of time) and not "solar power" as we know it today.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
But seeing as Eaton's also used to retail Rolex under their own name ('Solar Aqua,' to name just one, as we've previously discussed), I'm fascinated to know whose movement was used in this incarnation of the Solar name. And whatever did those jewels do on the minute wheel, aside from add to the count? Was the idea that they might have acted as bearing surfaces, and reduced friction in some way?
This particular one has "Gallet" on the caseback; Eatons had a long history with Gallet starting back with the Eatons brand pocket watches.

As for the jewels on the minute wheel, they don't appear to do (or even be able to do) anything. The jewel is totally recessed in the wheel, so they can't touch anything. There's another wheel in this movement that's the same:
DSC_9476.JPG

Its an AS 1700 movement in a 25 jewel configuration (which is pretty decent); there are lots of jewels in good places too. Both the autowind reducer gears have internal jewels, for example:
DSC_9473.JPG

They just needed to up the ante, I guess, and that was the easiest way to do it. It has "41 Jewels" engraved on the rotor, so it was a factory spec. This came into Canada, so I suspect there wasn't any actual law about jewels needing to be "Functional" like in the US. I had thought Switzerland had something about it, but I guess not.
 

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On a watch like that-rather obscure-not extremely exciting-you could have left the patina (and it was patina-along with a couple of dirt smudges)and it would have been fine with me. But I tried one of your earlier posts on gently cleaning a dial and i fkd it up so bad I sent it to a re-dialer and he didn't do much better. Thank g-d my wife doesn't have the insanity-w-watch gene beach she is completely thrilled with my early 50s 14k square dialed Omega with the non-perfect 'OMEGA". I can't even look at it without wincing. And I am now building up courage and funds to find the exact-I mean exact-0even if I have to go and interview the dude-right person to redial; my nearly destroyed VC which-if not done perfectly-I'd prefer in its 89% faded state-at least it original.

great post Ab
 

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Discussion Starter #12
But I tried one of your earlier posts on gently cleaning a dial and i fkd it up so bad I sent it to a re-dialer and he didn't do much better. Thank g-d my wife doesn't have the insanity-w-watch gene beach she is completely thrilled with my early 50s 14k square dialed Omega with the non-perfect 'OMEGA". I can't even look at it without wincing. And I am now building up courage and funds to find the exact-I mean exact-0even if I have to go and interview the dude-right person to redial; my nearly destroyed VC which-if not done perfectly-I'd prefer in its 89% faded state-at least it original.
The challenge with most of these dials is getting the lacquer off without damaging the underlying print (which is usually enamel or similar). A lot depends on what the lacquer was in the first place; if the solvent part softens the top layer of the print, then removing the lacquer without removing the printing becomes difficult (if not impossible). The second challenge is finding a cleaning solution that is strong enough to weaken the lacquer without weakening the print. Finally, technique becomes critical because if you're too aggressive , you'll wind up just scratching the print off. On this one, I started with salivia on a corner around one of the minute markers to see if I could remove the lacquer without removing the marker. When that succeeded, I switched to vinegar. IN both cases, I was using a q-tip and "rolling" the tip (so no rubbing at all). This is a very time consuming but generally safe method. Once I determined that the lacquer didn't seem to be adhering to the print, I upgraded to gently rubbing with the q-tip, and eventually found that I could use pegwood dipped in vinegar on places like around the raised markers.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Had to wait on a part before putting it all back together, but the final result is rather worth the wait, I think. New crystal and strap, and we're good to go!
DSC_9524.JPG

And of course, my standard "parts" shot. Points if you can spot which part I was missing! (you'd probably need to cross-reference a parts list to figure it out though). Playing "count the jewels" is fun too...

DSC_9482.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Great result Ar,really worth the effort,imo(your missing the mainspring and a crown?)
Actually, I'd forgotten that it was missing the crown when I got it, but that wasn't the part I needed to order; I tend to view things like crowns and mainsprings as "consumables", not really "parts".
 
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