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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For summer, I’m considering getting a perlon strap for my black and yellow pilot watch. However, I have a strong preference for pattens or stripes; the solid perlons don’t do much for me. Looking on ebay, I’m not finding a patterned option with yellow. Where might I find one?

Also, any thoughts on the standard weave vs open or double weave or other choices? Thanks!

 

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I usually only see them in solid colors, at least from most of the major vendors.

Might look at Etsy.com for another suggestion. I know some of their vendors carry Perlon and maybe you will get lucky and find a striped version.

Good luck.
 

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Perlon straps are monochrome at 99,9%. Braided nylon straps (polychrone) are often sold as Perlon.
There have been a couple of pretty detailed threads here on WatchUSeek about genuine Perlon (trade mark) vs. braided nylon being sold as Perlon. Perlon and Nylon both are Polyamide but different fibres and of course made out of different basics (Perlon = Caprolactam, Nylon = Hexamethylendiamin + Adipin) which ends up in a different fracture strain. All other properties are somehow comparable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Huh, interesting. I’ve got plenty of nylon natos, just curious to try something lightweight.

Thanks all!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bumping this topic, still interested in multicolor perlon straps.
 

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Perlon straps are monochrome at 99,9%. Braided nylon straps (polychrone) are often sold as Perlon.
There have been a couple of pretty detailed threads here on WatchUSeek about genuine Perlon (trade mark) vs. braided nylon being sold as Perlon. Perlon and Nylon both are Polyamide but different fibres and of course made out of different basics (Perlon = Caprolactam, Nylon = Hexamethylendiamin + Adipin) which ends up in a different fracture strain. All other properties are somehow comparable.
I’m going to call this the ’excellent post of the day.’ Just yesterday, I was trying to figure out the origin of the Perlon name and discovered it is the brand name for a particular type of nylon filament. However, what differentiates it from other nylon filament used to weave things like watch strap remained a mystery to me. Now I have my answer. Thank you!
 
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