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Discussion Starter #1
Learning how to photograph with Pixel 3!!

Presenting the Tudor North Flag

Pixel 3
Corrugated plastic for base and background
Portrait mode
Adjust exposure

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Discussion Starter #11
A lot of feedback to change lighting. I will look into what I have.. will not be buying lights just to photograph watches..

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I like what you've done here, but let's see if we can take it a step further.

There are really two strategies when composing a shot where the subject is an inanimate object.

1. Fill the frame. Many of the shots you have taken leave about 50 percent of the available space in frame blank. This draws the viewer's eye to the center of your shot, but doesn't draw them in, if that makes sense. If you fill the frame with your object, the viewer is invited to look at each part of the timepiece individually, piece by piece. They'll be able to appreciate the power indicator; they'll see the detail of the dial, the depth of the hands, and etc. They are not looking at a watch- put a timepiece, more than the sum of its parts. You've taken a couple of shots that come pretty close to accomplishing this, but I'd challenge you to crop even closer or better yet, fill the frame in camera rather than cropping afterward.

2. Fill the frame... with other stuff.
If you don't want to fill the frame with the subject, place other things in the frame to tell a story. Give hints to the history of the watch, what you plan on using it for, and so on. Look at the attached ad for the Glycine Airman- there are old dogtags in the background, safety rope, and a couple of other things to illustrate that this watch harkens back to aviators of a bygone era. You know the story before you even have to read about it. Screen Shot 2019-05-18 at 1.37.58 PM.png

Finally, think about what's behind your subject. There are a couple shots where there's a line in the background (maybe the edge of the table and the back wall?) that cuts straight through the watch. Lines are fine, but they should be leading lines: leading the eyes of the viewer directly to your subject. Otherwise, lines like this can be distracting.

Very cool stuff. I look forward to seeing more!

AJ
 
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