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Discussion Starter #1
I do a bit of macro photography of watch parts and I recently moved locations. I use proper photography lights however My pictures have been having a yellow tint to them (I have attached an extreme example). I thinks this is being caused by light shining through the blinds in the room I'm using. I was going to get black out material to block off the window so that I control all the light in the room. Is this a good idea or are there other solutions?

DSC_2456.JPG
 

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I don't know if you shoot your photos using RAW format, but if you don't try that. RAW gives you tremendous latitude in white balance and can remove the yellow cast sometimes caused by tungsten lighting.

Chris
 

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I don't know if you shoot your photos using RAW format, but if you don't try that. RAW gives you tremendous latitude in white balance and can remove the yellow cast sometimes caused by tungsten lighting.

Here are a couple of examples - first one is out of the camera taken with auto white balance, second is after quick white balance adjustment. Both photos were then converted to JPG for size.




Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the help. I was trying the tips today and my images are a lot better. Not 100% but much better. I have attached a picture of the light coming through the blinds and there is over 12 square meters of this. Will it have no effect as I think it might be a major contributing factor?

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As long as you set your white balance, it should not prove to be too big of an issue. However, you can also change the temperature of the hot lights you use in your lighting set up to diminish this yellowing as well.
 

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Most cameras have a white balance adjustment. Just take a picture of a white card or piece of paper and adjust untill its white. You han also try the autosettungs depending on the camera. Post adjustments always help but best to get it right in camera if you can
 

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I am not in the scene to see the actual setup and determine what causes the white balance to be off. But you can do a test with a grey card to determine the problem, just cover the blind with a blackout curtain or do the test at night when night is not going through the blind or reflecting off it. If space allows, you can also shoot with the grey card and crop it off after digital editing.
 

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Also, if the light through the blinds isn't very strong, you can control ambient light by adjusting your in-camera exposure. Since it sounds like you're using light sources, adjust your exposure until your photo is pitch black without the flashes. When you take the photos using the flash, only those lights will show up in the photo, if that makes sense.

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I agree with most on the post. White balance first, shoot in raw and neutral if u have professional camera and you can easily chance color temp in a post processing program. Easy peasy. If shooting with a point and shoot or your phone, you can still edit your photos and balance the yellow to a blue-er temp to get more white whites. There's lots of tutorials on YouTube...Good luck
 

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what lens do you use? some vintage lenses uses a radioactive coating that turns yellow and tints your photos. if your setup is modern then i would echo the other guys and look at working with the white balance.
 
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