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Discussion Starter #1
This thread is a resource for pictures of notable HEQ movements. Pictures of watches that they are installed in can be included as well.

If you have a high quality picture of a movement not shown here, please consider posting it here. I would prefer if you uploaded the picture directly to the forum, rather than providing a link. This way, it will be a permanent resource for the forum.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
First contribution. Citizen A660H. Crrently the most tightly spec'ed non-RC movement made. Used exclusively in the "The Citizen" line, which has also been called the "Chronomaster" line starting in '05. The third picture shows an '04 model. The fourth pic shows a model from the first year that the line came out ('95). Note the conservatism and the minor design changes for the first ten years. The last picture shows an '05 model (courtesy of Pierre deBrial). This year marked a notable design change.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Next is a Seiko Twin Quartz (Courtesy of Ian Fogden). This movement used two crystals operating at different frequencies to enable temperature correction. It was introduced around 1978 as best we know. There is conflicting information on the performance of this movement, with some documents indicating that it was spec'ed to five seconds per year, and others indicating 20 seconds per year. Whichever is correct, it was a remarkable and innovative approach to temperature compensation.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Next up is a Rolex Oysterquartz 5035 movement. (The picture is courtesy of Jocke.) It's day-date cousin is the 5055. Introduced in 1977, it is the only TCVCXO thermocompensated movemement known. Rolex never officially stated a specification, but unofficially we understand that 60 seconds per year was to be expected. A remarkably well made and finished movement, it was discontinued in 2004.

<Due to operator error, the pics did not get attached. See the next post for these.>
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Here is the Seiko 9F, used exclusively in the Grand Seiko line as far as I know. It is spec'ed to 10 seconds per year, except for the 9F61 (shown), which was a special issue in 2000 that was spec'ed to 5 seconds per year. It has also been stated that it is designed to need no maintenance for fifty years. (Watch pic by Rex.)
 

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Pictures of the Citizen E510 movement (Eco-Drive, perpetual calendar, +/-10 seconds per year, 32kHz oscillator, 0 jewels "fly-by-wire") used by a model of the Citizen Attesa and the Citizen Exceed:
 

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Pictures of the Seiko 8F (8F32) movement (3V lithium battery, perpetual calendar, +/-20 seconds per year, 196kHz oscillator, 4 jewels) used by many Seiko models:
 

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Pictures (by Walt Arnstein) of the ETA 255.561 movement (dual-oscillator, +/-10 seconds per year, 6 jewels) used by the Longines Conquest VHP and the Krieger Marine Chronometer:
 

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Finally, pictures of the ETA 252.611 = Longines Caliber L.546.2 (perpetual calendar, 3V lithium battery, 11 jewels, +/-10 seconds per year) used by the Longines Conquest VHP Perpetual Calendar, Longines Flagship VHP Perpetual Calendar and the Piquot Meredian Octantis Marine Chronometer:
 

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Seiko 7A38 Movement and Watch

The 7A28, 7A38 and 7A48 Seiko calibres are considered to be the top of the line Seiko chronograph calibres. Sporting 15 jewels, 4 stepper motors and an all metal construction, they are often compared favorably to the IWC and JLC Mecaquartz watches. Retailing for around $250 in the mid-1980's, the watches often bring that and more today.

The movement can be regulated by adjustment of a capacitor as seen on the movement face. This movement was keeping time at about +140 sec/year. After regulation, the watch is now running at +40 sec/year. The minimum adjustment step for this calibre is +-0.26 sec/day so it is now running as good as can be expected.

The first scan was taken under diffused light and the second was taken using a ring flash. Quite a difference in how the metal appears with the different lighting. The third scan is the watch face, a 7A38-7289 series.
 

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IWC Mecaquartz

Here are two of the IWC Mecaquartz movements.

The first is an IWC GST Mecaquartz calibre 631 and the second is the IWC Ingenieur calibre 633. The calibre 633 has the added complication of an alarm.

The associated complete watches are shown in the final two scans.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Here is the legendary Citizen Crystron Mega. One of two 4 MHz wristwatches ever made. (Junghans also had a model.) Issued in 1975 and spec'ed to 3 seconds per year, the tighest ever claimed by a manufacturer. At a reported cost of $15,000 when issued, few were made. (There were evidently two later issues not in gold that were less expensive. I do not know if similar accuracy was claimed for them.)

I have never seen decent pictures on the web, so, even though I do not have a pic of the movement, I'm posting these. They are from Gene Stone's The Watch. (Abrams, 2006, ISBN 13: 978-0-8109-3093-3)
 

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Waltham Electrodyne - ESA 9154

This is one of the first battery powered watches... a normal ESA mechanical movement with the mainspring replaced with a motor. This watch probably dates from the 1960s.

Attached are 2 pictures - a face pic of the watch beside a baseplate of a deceased Electrodyne, and a closeup of the ESA marking.
 

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Tuning Fork Watches

Bulova pioneered tuning fork watches with their Accutron line. Other Swiss companies licensed the technology to product their own.

Pictured below are side by side are an Omega f300 and an Accutron. The Accutron is a 218 movement (their last) and dates from about 1970. The Omega is a Calibre 1260.
 

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Megasonic 720hz...

Here's a few pictures of a buddy of mines 720 Megasonic before and after restoration. It was a non-runner and in a very poor state:

Before...





After...



A beautiful and very interesting watch. Sorry, no pictures of the restored movement.

Fats
 
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