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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

following a number of very productive recent threads on what watches pilots wear, let me ask you about something slightly different, yet related … your cockpit clocks.

Cockpit clocks are not only an inspiration for the design of pilot's watches (think Sinn, and Bell&Ross, e.g.), they also define the range of timekeeping functions that are necessary for the operation of an aircraft, and are therefore of particular interest for aviation watch enthusiasts.

I'll start off this thread with a "Junghans Bo UK 1 - FL 23885" cockpit clock of WWII vintage (originally probably mounted in a Messerschmitt Bf 109): time and 15-minute-chronograph, with additional elapsed time rotatable bezel. The chronograph (single pusher works start-stop-reset; no flyback function). I particularly like the unusual shape of the hands. :-!



(kaempo's picture from FlyingTime http://www.flying-time.de/wbb2/thread.php?threadid=473&page=1 ; I purchased the clock from him recently, but have been unable to pick it up in person yet ;-)).

So show us your cockpit clocks (whether in your "workplace", or on your desk/wall) and please don't forget to describe its functions, and the type of aircraft it was or is used in!
 

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First pic is of a Huey UH-1H. Ok, so you need eagle eyes to see it but you can see the 8-day on the inst panel, it's the lowest right. Also you can see my kneeboard timer. The wrist watch is just out of frame. ;-)

8-day is just that, time/start-stop-reset. One knob to set the time(pull out) and wind it up, the other is a push button for the timer. Standard clock that is in a TON of older US military aircraft. Most newer birds have a digital clock like in the bottom pic, it is a T-6 Texan II(upper left corner)

Kneeboard clock is a time(set to UTC)+4 individual timers job with NVG LED on the far right side just out of frame. The timers can be set to either count up or down. Usually I have one timer going up for total sortie duration, another one counting down for fuel checks, one more for TOT/turn point management and the last for whatever. The dash clock gets used to time what ever too, such as checklist procedure stuff that requires timing like engine shutdown, running in mil power, inst approaches, etc.

Also have another clock on the GPS control head and one more on my wrist....think I have enough options? :-d



 

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Here's my Junghans luftwaffe FL23885 clock with my FL22320 altimeter and FL32276 map light (w/box).
I used parts from two clocks to get this one running (a WW2 and a 1950s) then had it serviced by a 'real' watchmaker because it's one of my 'keepers'.



Here's a better photo of the Junghans clock, in the background are some Spitfire instruments, all dated 1940, boost gauge, ASI and rim-wind MKII clock (Jaeger LeCoultre movement).




cheers for now,

-Flightpath
 

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Discussion Starter #5
An impressive collection, Flightpath :-! ... can you tell us a bit about the functions of some of those watches (chronograph? flyback? other special functions?) and which type of aircraft they were used in?
 

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Nice thread!
I'm sure I have a few pictures somewhere of the clock in our 777, but can't find them :-(. As soon as I do, or have made a few others, I'll show you mine!
 

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Looks like you found a nice Bo-UK 1 Martin, congratulations! I can email
you the 1939 version of the Luftwaffen "Bedienungs- and Wartungsvorschrift"
if you are interested.



The Hamilton AN 5741-1 (H-37500) is a complicated clock with lots of
parts. Built during WWII it has two chronographs and a "civil date" function.
Marvin Whitney's book "Military Timepieces" has all the info about it.
This clock was used at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Hamilton quality is just excellent!

The Russian A4C-1 (ATschS-1) is a copy of the famous Jaeger Chronoflite.
Two chronographs and a 27 Volt heating system. I am glad that I don't
own a Geiger counter, it probably would go ballistic near the dial. And yes,
it's very loud, but also very precise. There were several versions and
different lumimous materials, for example red light or ultra violet cockpit
light conditions.

The Russian M55 aka "doomsday clock" was used with rocket troops and
long range bombers like the Tupolev Tu 160. The clock has a 48hr
indication, a small window at 1500 shows the first or the second 24hr
period. It also has a 27 Volts heater and on the backside there are lots of
electrical contacts. Maybe this has to do with engine start up procedures,
not sure...


Tupolev Tu 160

Sinn clocks are used with German military and civilian aircraft, fixed or
rotary wing. My "Navigations-Borduhren" NaBo type 16 and 17 are BUND
issue and the movements are Valjoux 551, with and without swan neck
regulation. The type 16 has a small second hand and the 17 on the right
has a 3H dial. The case dimensions are identical to the WWII Junghans models.


NaBo 17


Type 17 in German naval aviation (Marineflieger) Breguet 1150 sub hunter


Marineflieger Breguet 1150 and Lockheed P-3


Best regards
Thomas
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nice thread!
I'm sure I have a few pictures somewhere of the clock in our 777, but can't find them :-(. As soon as I do, or have made a few others, I'll show you mine!
Here is a picture from your original post about the B 777 cockpit clock which I saved:

 

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The standard military 8 day clock in this shot...

Took this shot this morning w/the cell phone (sorry for the poor quality). It is the 8 day clock seen in a lot of military aircraft:



The button in the upper right corner starts/stops/resets the second hand and the knurled knob in the lower left corner is used to wind the clock and change the time.

This clock is probably why I like react so positively to the Sinns and Damaskos that are similar.
 

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Re: The standard military 8 day clock in this shot...

This clock is probably why I like react so positively to the Sinns and Damaskos that are similar.
My thoughts exactly. Too bad you didn't get the "push hard" sticker in the frame. That always makes me laugh. :-d
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Re: The standard military 8 day clock in this shot...

Took this shot this morning w/the cell phone (sorry for the poor quality). It is the 8 day clock seen in a lot of military aircraft:

...
The button in the upper right corner starts/stops/resets the second hand and the knurled knob in the lower left corner is used to wind the clock and change the time.
Thanks for showing that one ... does that mean it's a time-only clock with just a 60-second chronograph, or is there a central minute counter hidden under the second hand?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Re: The standard military 8 day clock in this shot...

Thanks, Thomas ... looks like a 60-minute chronograph. :)
 

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Some of you might have seen my post about this clock a while back, it's the only aircraft clock that I have with a history...........


Long ago, Tom, an ex-RAAF WW2 pilot, was the accountant where I worked. We used to look through his log book at lunch times and he'd tell me the story of each sortie like it was yesterday.
One day he came to a page and said "oh, I almost forgot about this one, we were on an anti-sub patrol and switched fuel tanks, both engines stopped; we dropped our depth charges and turned for land, then did a flop into a swamp in a deserted part of northern Australia. Everyone was fine, we strung up an antenna & radioed base. While we waited three days to be picked up by the navy I asked the navigator to take the clock out for me.......... I still have it........ would you like it?"

Well, you can guess my answer...... next day Tom came in with a small box containing the clock, his RAAF pilot wings and photos of the crash site... I really didn't know what to say and gratefully accepted these special things.... he could never understand why I was interested in his stories or the clock!

The clock's winding knob was missing along with half the broken shaft.
I made a new shaft, fitted a new knob, cleaned the face and painted the hands to match. I then had the clock serviced at a 'real' watchmaker.. he was very impressed with the pre-war Longines movement...............



The clock is an 8 day Longines-Wittnauer Swiss movement (Kollsman Instrument Co. 305-3D-01) with internal lighting, the Lockheed Hudson A16-242 was recovered two months later and used for spare parts.

cheers,

-Flightpath
PS-
when I received clock the face was almost completely black, I didn't want to waste such a nice clock and spent about three hours with my eyeglass and smallest jewlers screwdriver (VERY) gently takeing off the (now) black luminous material........... this is what was underneath, I painted the hands to match.
 

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following a number of very productive recent threads on what watches pilots wear, let me ask you about something slightly different, yet related … your cockpit clocks.
...hmmm...
I don't have pictures of the cockpit clocks, or as I search ebay, I search for aircraft clock.

But, I do have several, as I seem to like them, and their purely mechanical movements.
I have a Dodane Type 11, which is quite like the Sinn NaBo in appearance and function having the Valjoux 551 movement.
I rarely see reference to this cockpit clock - Tissot Type 12, which has the Valjoux 555 movement and true retour en vol flyback function, but looks again quite similar to the NaBo.
Then there is the CDIA 24 hour dial with date indication by Waltham, I believe.
Some day... I will own one of those wonderful "5 dial" Elgin/Waltham clocks Thomas has in one of his pictures.
Show us more, please.
Someone ought to have picture of inside/outside of the Type 12 for us... or, I guess I will see if I have picture, or take picture... lazy me.
 

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Wow, awesome thread here! I know it's not what you intended, but this is what I use in the various rental aircraft I fly b-)

 
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