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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everybody.

This is my first post, and as the title says, I'm looking to buy myself an Omega Speedmaster.

I was at the jewlery store recently trying one on, and I didn't ask as many questions as I should have, so I've got a few for the knowledgeable members here: First, a lot of the ones I see on eBay say "Speedmaster Automatic" on the dial. Does this mean that their winding mechanism is the daily movement of the watch itself, or are these automatics supposed to be wound by twisting the knob?

I'm a little unsure of the self-winding watches, as I have heard people describe them (not Omegas specifically, but that kind of watch in general) as being a little unreliable, because they tend to run slow sometimes. To me, winding it yourself the same time every day seems like it would be more reliable. Can anyone educate me on this point?

Also, the jewelery store's model was about 3 thousand dollars. I want one of these watches, but I don't want to shell out that much money, so I've been carefully watching eBay to see what they go for.

There's a seller in California with over 3500 sales and 99.9% feedback named "jmryshi." I can't imagine he'd have such a high score if he was selling lousy merchandise, but I'm going to be gunshy no matter what about this stuff. Would he be a good person to buy from? Has anyone bought from him in the past? If so, what are your thoughts?

Also, is there a particular model or era of Speedmaster that is best? If so, which one?

Do they keep accurate time?
 

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The dealer you mention is generally very well thought of - I would buy from him (internationally) without a worry.

There are several automatic versions of the Speedmaster. However the original Speedmaster pro is a manual watch. I think the vast majority of members of this forum would urge you to go for the original.

However, whoever has been telling you about automatics is simply wrong. there is no reason why an automatic should be either less reliable or less accurate than a manual. Indeed, because the watch is always fully wound in everyday use there is a reasonable case for saying it may be more accurate than a watch wound once a day.

You will not go far wrong with a speedmaster pro or with the seller you mention. However, please remember that ALL mechanical watches are intrinsically less accurate than even cheap quartz watches. If you are looking for absolutely spot on accuracy then you will be better off with a quartz.

Hope this helps and good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, M4tt, that does help a lot.

I basically just signed up here and posted my thread right away. I then went to the Omega picture thread where everyone has posted pictures of their watches and I discovered that pretty much everyone who owns a Speedmaster here owns a "Professional."

I think that's the kind I want, too. Do they make new models of the Pro, or are they strictly vintage? It just seems like I see tons of automatics out there.

My worry with an automatic is the possibility that maybe my arm hasn't moved quite enough, and therefore the accuracy of the time might suffer. Do people make a point of shaking their arm around a bit at a certain point of the day?

Maybe I'm obsessing over it too much. Currently I own a Wenger watch, which is battery powered, and I've never given a thought to whether it's a second or a minute off in two years. The delight in owning a genuine Speedmaster would make me forget about its timing too, I'll bet (unless it's not operating properly or something).

I'm in Canada, so I'm glad to hear that seller is well thought of. So say I decide to go with the Speedmaster Professional - what's the average price range for a pre-owned one? I'm pretty young, and although I've got the money to buy a brand new Speedmaster, I don't really want to shell out that much money. The jewelery store here had one for $3000. I'm looking at that seller's auction history, and I'm seeing them routinely go for $800 - 1500. So If I could get a Professional in that range (is this possible?) I'd be happy. The lower side of a thousand seems unlikely, but still.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
By the way, can you tell me more about Quartz watches and why they're so accurate?

Do Speedmaster Professionals have a Quartz version?
 

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Hey everybody.

This is my first post, and as the title says, I'm looking to buy myself an Omega Speedmaster.

I was at the jewlery store recently trying one on, and I didn't ask as many questions as I should have, so I've got a few for the knowledgeable members here: First, a lot of the ones I see on eBay say "Speedmaster Automatic" on the dial. Does this mean that their winding mechanism is the daily movement of the watch itself, or are these automatics supposed to be wound by twisting the knob?

I'm a little unsure of the self-winding watches, as I have heard people describe them (not Omegas specifically, but that kind of watch in general) as being a little unreliable, because they tend to run slow sometimes. To me, winding it yourself the same time every day seems like it would be more reliable. Can anyone educate me on this point?

Also, the jewelery store's model was about 3 thousand dollars. I want one of these watches, but I don't want to shell out that much money, so I've been carefully watching eBay to see what they go for.

There's a seller in California with over 3500 sales and 99.9% feedback named "jmryshi." I can't imagine he'd have such a high score if he was selling lousy merchandise, but I'm going to be gunshy no matter what about this stuff. Would he be a good person to buy from? Has anyone bought from him in the past? If so, what are your thoughts?

Also, is there a particular model or era of Speedmaster that is best? If so, which one?

Do they keep accurate time?
This will be easy..............
Welcome to the forum, its great to hear from you and look forward to more posts. Introduce yourself and tell everyone where you are from.
The first watch you're talking of is a Speedmaster reduced. Its smaller
than a Speedmaster Pro but reliable, runs well and they have sold millions
of them, They must be doing something right. As far as being self-winding.....well, they have been making self winding watches for 80 or so
years so if it were unreliable, there wouldn't be so many self winding
watches. Most watch failures have nothing to do with the winding
mechs. Don't worry about it, there are many more critical things to go wrong inside besides that. the Speedmaster Pro is hand wound and the
reduced model is automatic.
Expect to pay around 3k for a new Speedy Pro. Look around for a
discount, there are guy here that will hook you up on around 30%
discount, so the price is getting a little better. Thats the hesalite crystal
and and solid back speedy. Going for the sapphire front and rear will cost
more. Look around and see which suits you.
The seller in California is a good guy. I have bought 5 or 6 watches from
him in the last few years. A good price
from a good seller.
The Speedmaster keeps great time and is super reliable. Get the basic model to begin with and work your way up. You will enjoy the speedy.
Its an icon watch and will grow on you. Be careful!
jim

 

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Seller is very very reliable and you will not regret anything.

As for the Speed Pro, what the other guys said pretty much sums it up. It is an iconic watch, a "man's" watch some say because of the winding thing, but as for the reliability, I find it as reliable as any other automatic timepiece I own.

Good luck and advanced congratulations (if you do decide to go ahead)...let us see some pics!

Glimmer
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, Jim. And thanks, Glimmer. I'll be sure to post pictures if or when I get my watch.

I'm from Ottawa, Ontario, and I'm trying to research the Omegas as best I can, but I keep running into more and more questions. With something this expensive, I want to make sure I don't make a mistake. The last thing I'd want to have happen is my parcel show up and there be a disappointment inside (though if it's an Omega, I'm sure it can't be that disappointing).

The watch I tried on at the jewelery store did fit nicely on my wrist. Do you think it would have been one of those automatic ones that are reduced in size? I actually thought its size was great. You see a lot of people with watches that are way too big for them, you know? I'm sure the Speedmaster Pro won't be comically large or anything, but I think I'd better track one down locally and try it on to make sure I know exactly what I'm getting.

The clerk at the store warned that if I do take the eBay route, I won't be getting the warantee. Is this a concern for many? I suppose not, if you're into vintage watches. He did say that only Omega would service the watch, though. So if I take it to your regular ol' watch repair shop, are they going to turn me away or something? Or is it kind of like a Dell computer's warantee, where anyone can bust it open to take a look, but doing so voids the contract?
 

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Hi Clint, and welcome to the forum. There are some guys here (Jim Moose among them, I see he's already swapped thoughts with you) who have an encyclopedic knowledge of these watches, down to matters of historical interest and mechanical details. You're in the right place.
Just wanted to chime in on the price - I believe you can comfortably get a new classic Speedy Pro 3570.50 for a little over $2100 delivered (after the discount), from an authorized dealer, full warranty, pristine watch - while there may be many authorized dealers that offer this type of discount, there is one in particular that many here have found excellent to deal with if your interests go in that direction.

Good luck in your shopping. Best, John
 

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I bought my first Speedy pro from jmryshi back when his feedback score was less than 100. He typically has very nice pieces and stands behind them. Other forum members have had good experiences with sabashioyakiz1 and kaberui on eBay. Nice 3570.50s usually go for around $1500 and my personal favorite, the 3572.50 hesalite/sapphire, will usually sell for $200-300 more.

I have owned a couple of dozen Speedy Pros over the years but unlike Jim, I didn't keep them all, only having three at the moment.

Omega will service any authentic Omega watch but only warranty servicing will be without cost.

And BTW, I've never bought a new Speedy Pro.

Fr. John+
 

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Opinions differ

some will agree with me, some won't. I have only purchased two new Omegas with warranty and only 3 new watches period. I have never used the warranty. I have an independent watchmaker that works on
all my watches and does a great job, he is reasonably price and if its
something he can't repair, he will say so and find someone that can.
I trust him. If I were you, I would save some money, buy used and
find a good watchmaker. You will always come out ahead. As I said,
others will disagree but there ain't no damn way I'm sending a watch
back to Omega, even under warranty, half way around the world
for issues regarding the quality of work. No Way!
If you get a good used quality watch, take care of it, it won't have
many service issues for around 5 years and probably longer if its fairly new.
Go to a local AD, try on the Speedy Pro and the reduced model
and see which suits you. Then buy it used and save the cash.
jim
 

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I agree with Jim 200%.

The two new Omegas in my collection were not bought for the warranty. Even if something were to break during their warranty periods, I would have repairs performed locally were I can talk face to face with the watchmaker.

No way I am going to send my watch off anywhere for service, especially to Omega.

Fr. John+
 

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Re: Opinions differ

Hi Clint,

From what I've been able to ascertain, the cheaper speedy pros seem to be watch-only deals. The ones that look like they're selling around $1500-1800 are generally complete packages, with the boxes, manual and warranty cards.

If you only want one to wear, then go ahead and buy the watch by itself. However, I warn you -- this watch thing can turn into an obsession, and you may end up wishing you'd splurged on a watch/box/papers deal.

The reduced/date model is very nice. but, again, you may well end up buying a pro after you come to the realization that it's the one to have. I own a date, which is similar to the reduced model, and I now have a pro on its way to me.

Where in Canada are you located?

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hey Jason. I'm in Ottawa. You?

I've actually come to the conclusion that I want a Speedmaster Professional. I like the idea of a watch you must manually wind. It seems like a very classic, gentlemanly kind of thing. Now if only I could get a handle on understanding all of the different numerical codes for the different versions of the Pro. Is there an easy to way to understand which watch someone is referring to, or does this simply come with increased research?

Also, a question: Exactly how often must you wind the watch? Do most guys do it the same time each day, or is it common to fidget with the thing at various times to simply make sure it's always got enough speed to keep going? And another question: suppose you wind the watch as far as it will go, so that it's fully charged -- I've heard that you're to wind it every day, but how long (hours / days?) would it go before stopping if you didn't wind it again? I'm sure it's not an issue, but I've never had a watch like this before (only battery-powered), so I just want to know whether it'd be okay to maybe let winding it slide for maybe 36 hours as opposed to the standard 24 or something, you know? I haven't had a chance to look at an operator's instruction book yet, so how exactly does the setting work with the knob? I'm guessing that there are different pull settings with it, so that at one point it'll simply wind up the watch's internal mechanism and not alter the time, right?

The reason I like the manual winding watch idea is because you're personally in charge of its power. I've been told that the automatic watches are very reliable and all, but what I don't like about them is the fact you can only base the watch's accuracy on the assumption that it's working.

For instance, say you were in the middle of the woods with your Speedmaster with no clocks to check to make sure your watch is keeping close with the actual time. With a manual watch that you wind every morning to its full capacity, you can be nearly certain (based on say, five years of use) that it has always kept accurate time based on a long history of a specific number of turns. With an automatic watch, I know I'd find myself wondering whether or not I had moved my arm enough to keep its accuracy. Kind of a "what if?" situation. But actually, there's another question for you guys: is it possible to manually wind the automatics, or do you strictly have to rely on the movement of your watch arm?
 

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I think you're making the right decision to find yourself a Pro, Clint. It sounds like the right watch for you.

You asked a number of questions, so I'll go through them as well as I can.

Is there an easy to way to understand which watch someone is referring to, or does this simply come with increased research?
The first place to check would be Omega's site, which lists reference numbers for current models. Here's a quick summary of models with metal bracelets:
ref.3570.50 - classic Pro with hesalite crystal and solid, steel caseback
ref.3573.50 - "Sapphire Sandwich" with sapphire crystal and sapphire "display" caseback
ref.3572.50 - discontinued model with hesalite crystal and solid, steel caseback


Exactly how often must you wind the watch? Do most guys do it the same time each day, or is it common to fidget with the thing at various times to simply make sure it's always got enough speed to keep going?
Most wind it daily at about the same time, but it's fine to give it an extra wind, if the mood should strike you.

suppose you wind the watch as far as it will go, so that it's fully charged -- I've heard that you're to wind it every day, but how long (hours / days?) would it go before stopping if you didn't wind it again?
The power reserve is 48 hours.

how exactly does the setting work with the knob? I'm guessing that there are different pull settings with it, so that at one point it'll simply wind up the watch's internal mechanism and not alter the time, right?
The Pro only has two positions. With the crown pushed in, to its normal position, it can be wound. When it is pulled out, you set the time.

is it possible to manually wind the automatics, or do you strictly have to rely on the movement of your watch arm?
All of Omega's automatic watches can also be hand-wound.

Hope that helps a bit.

eric
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yes, that certainly helps me out a lot, Eric. Thanks very much for taking the time to respond, everyone. :-!

I was checking out pictures of the Speedmasters with a Google image search, when I stumbled across this writeup on the watch:

http://www.expeditionexchange.com/omega/indexmain.shtml

Very informative, with great pictures of the watch on its own, and being used by astronauts of varying countries!
 

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Does anyone have any complaints about the hesalite crystal? I've read that it's not scratch resistant, but that they can be buffed out.

Are they telling me it will scratch easily? Can anyone confirm or deny this?
 

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Welcome to the forum Clint!

The best mechanical Speedmaster to go for, is the 3570.50 aka Speedy Pro.





Firstly, the Hesalite crystal is great, although it does scratch. To be honest, its as clear as you could possibly need, the dial is so legible on this watch you'll just end up staring at it. Little scratches on the crystal only add to the feel and character of the piece, imo. They can be buffed out with a compound called Polywatch. Its a near as perfect mechanical chronograph "tool" watch as you could find, imho.

Jim pretty much sums it up perfectly. Try a few on, and buy the one you like the most on the wrist.

BEWARE
: Speedmaster's are contagious. Once you get one, another will follow...very quickly!!

Alex:-!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Alex,

Yeah, that's the watch I've been eyeing on the site. It's really beautiful. I've only been to the store to try on one Omega Speedmaster so far, and I believe it was an automatic one that was slightly smaller than the original Speedy's size. So I'm going to head to a couple of watch stores today and see if I can locate a Speedy Pro to try on.

I don't want to use $3000+ of my dollars, so I'm probably going to be buying the watch slightly used at a lower price if I can find one (patience is the key, I think), so the trick will be to give the clerk the impression that a sale might come of my browsing.

Though maybe I'll fall so completely in love with the watch when I'm trying it on, I'll just have to have it right there and then?! Heh. Either way, I'll be gaining one helluva watch, I can tell.
 

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Re: Welcome to the forum Clint!

While I agree that it is the Speedy Pro all the way I am still concerned that you have such a jaundiced view of Omega automatics. You can also wind them manually if you want, in fact, you could, if you wanted, remove the self winding mechanism and turn them into manual watches.

You can even get basically the same movement in manual or automatic, for example, the ETA 2801 and the ETA 2824. If I had the choice I know which I would go for. Mind you, it's that sort of logic that got me a Speedy Reduced followed by a Speedy Pro!
 
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