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Discussion Starter #1
$(KGrHqR,!h!E45)jF1JPBOR,gqlNRw~~0_14.JPG
$(KGrHqV,!jkE4oCK!9M7BORZNqHfRQ~~0_14.JPG
$(KGrHqUOKp!E4jMOrEzcBOR,guJ71g~~0_14.JPG

Flickr Uploads: http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/6036934582/in/photostream

I know my Grandfather bought this watch while in Switzerland, by what he said to me, but I can't seem to place the model, nor year, and I do not want to open the watch because I am not an expert of any kind when it comes to watches. From visiting a vintage watch site it looks like Longines took the Wellington, Upton, and Barclay and through them into a mixing bowl and out popped this watch. Anyone with any insight would be extremely helpful.

Thank You

Gary
 

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It looks like a normal Longines from the 40's to 60's. They often did not name models. Unfortunately most of the information of use is under the caseback. Nice piece. It should be serviced before use -- the dirt just grinds the pivots and makes the watch way too expensive to fix.
 

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It's good to know that it works because it means that it hasn't got any major flaws.

With regards servicing there are two main views on this. One suggests that servicing is expensive and so not worth doing until the watch stops or doesn't keep time and then the watchmaker can fix whatever might have been done.

The other view is that servicing is necessary, just like you wouldn't run a car without changing the oil every now and again.

Generally the first view is held by the owners of watches like Rolex where there is a very good supply of parts and the always expensive service includes all parts that might be needed.

The second view is held by the owners of watches where parts are hard to come by and a worn pivot might be either very expensive to have repaired or mean the watch ends up in the parts bin.

Unless you know the service history of your watch, running it is like buying a new car and not opening the hood. It might be OK, or then again it might have run out of oil or the cam belt might be about to snap, either one of which could result in a repair costing more than the car is worth.
 
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