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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks in advance to anyone who can help. I just picked up my first real watch at a local jeweler he took in as part of an estate. It is an 18kt solid yellow gold case Zenith, with correct hallmarks, (was shown before purchase but I am now familiar with how to open case to access and photo the movement). I think it is the guided type but not 100% on that. Dial is original and reads Swiss Made below the 6th numeral. Minute markers are present in a raised gold applique around the perimeter of the dial. Crown has the Zenith star visible. Serial on case reads 647966. Crystal is Acrylic (sorry if that is contradictory) and is was told it is original as well. Band is Crocodile but is not believed original. If anyone can tell me to how to safely open the case myself I am happy to, or if i can find a local watchmaker or jeweler I will add pics of the movement. I know it is 17 jewels manual movement and was thought by seller to be chronometer grade. In approximately 6 weeks of use It is keeping time within less than a minute, although it appears that power reserve only holds about 24-30 hours. ( I am not winding it to maximum position I believe it is late 50's or early 60's from what I could gather and don't want to damage the gearing. When inspected during purchase movement had no corrosion or signs of dirt or dust penetration. and was signed zenith as well. Sorry for rambling on, but not certain what is useful. Any help with Id would would be much appreciated, again this is the first in what I hope will be a growing collection.
 

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Welcome to the Zenith forum. You have a nice Zenith from the 1950s, probably with a Cal. 40 (or 40T) inside. The Cal. 135 would definitely be a chronometer but has 19 jewels whereas the other options, Cal. 106 or 126, both have only 15 jewels as standard. The exact age should be determinable by the serial number on the movement but you would have to have it opened up for that. The movement should look like this:

bidfun-db Archiv: Uhrwerke: Zenith 40

Hartmut Richter
 

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Welcome to the Zenith forum. You have a nice Zenith from the 1950s, probably with a Cal. 40 (or 40T) inside. The Cal. 135 would definitely be a chronometer but has 19 jewels whereas the other options, Cal. 106 or 126, both have only 15 jewels as standard. The exact age should be determinable by the serial number on the movement but you would have to have it opened up for that. The movement should look like this:

bidfun-db Archiv: Uhrwerke: Zenith 40

Hartmut Richter
Very nice! A beautiful gold case cal. 40 and a beautiful dial and set of hands and even an original crown.

Going by the case number it dates to ca. 1956.

Thanks for sharing and welcome to the forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Awsome watch Dan looks beautiful. Quick question, I want to wear the watch while hiking (hate leaving my cell on in the woods). I think that either the acrylic or an O ring in the case needs replacing as all is original and I don't want any moisture or dust getting in it. Any advice on what to have done to keep it running well and dry or should I wear something else in the woods?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the info Hessu, its my first good watch so still have big learning curve. Everything else I have had till this point has been quartz or cheap Kinetic IE Fossil. Based on that I will keep it Home next time.
 

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I would wear something else. For one thing, I would hate to add wear to the case and crystal. The 40 is a good movement, but the watch may be barely dust proof, but certainly will not be moisture proof. Mind you, I wear mine to work even if it is raining, I just try not to have the crown up while handling an umbrella. But that is only to and from the car. I would not do that all day.

To a large extent, we should know the limitations of our watches to avoid damaging them. I have other vintage watches that were like pocket watches, open to the atmosphere. They would condensate under some real heavy humidity conditions. Yet, because they were not submerged, there was little if any damage over many years. But once you get a drop or more of water rolling around in there, that is not good.

Dan
 
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