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I've run across a couple of pocket watches with a 2nd sub-dial that reads 0-40 Up-Down. What is this?
 

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I've run across a couple of pocket watches with a 2nd sub-dial that reads 0-40 Up-Down. What is this?
Power reserve indicator.
 
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Thank you. Was that a feature only on American Railroad Grade pocket watches, or did others have that as well?
 

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Thank you. Was that a feature only on American Railroad Grade pocket watches, or did others have that as well?
You can find it on Swiss and German deck chronometers and pocket watches, IIRC on some English ones as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm sorry, my question referred to other American non-rail road grade pocket watches.
 

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Picture???
 

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Picture???
This is from the vortic.com Build A Watch page. American made 51mm Rail Road Grade pocket watch movements, recently restored and ready to be cased up as ENORMOUS wristwatches.

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I was seriously considering buying one until someone mentioned that these movements won't have modern shock protection. Not that big a deal for a pocket watch, but for a wristwatch I'm thinking it kinda is.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Front of the case is hinged so you can access the setting lever.

Here's an interview about the company:

 

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Discussion Starter #12
Fairly sure those details are on the vortic web site. They show those watches as having been made in 1924-1925.
 

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They also case-up American made size 12 pocket watch movements. I priced one with a Waltham movement and a bronze case for $2150.
 

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So, you are interested in an American movement but on a wristwatch? There is or was, sorry I didn't save their site, out of England that has been doing this for year. Can't remember their name and they were real nice. Hopefully someone comes on here and remembers.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I started the thread because I wanted to know what the 0-40 Up-Down was. I wasn't aware that vintage pocket watches had power reserve indicators.

How I became aware of pocket watch movements with 0-40 Up-Down was by browsing the Vortic web site. Vortic is a company out of Denver that gathers vintage American-made pocket watch movements with vintage dial and hands, including rail road grade pocket watch movements, overhauls then to +/- 15 seconds per day, and cases them as wristwatches. Since I heard about Vortic I've thought that having an overhauled vintage pocket watch as a wristwatch would be sort of cool, and if you're going to do that then it only makes sense that it be a rail road grade pocket watch. And since I was born in Massachusetts then that meant that it had to be a Waltham.

But someone recently commented that a vintage pocket watch movement wouldn't have modern shock protection. That kind of argues against them as a daily wear wrist watch.

Still think it's cool as all hell, though.
 

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The vast majority of American watches with an up-down indicator were sold as railroad grade. In fact, it was a feature specifically sold to railroaders at the time as a "reminder" to wind their watch(there was some interesting "competition" between Elgin and Waltham with up/downs vs. the Illinois 60 hour mainspring, but that's another story).

Outside of some special one-off pieces like one particular 12 size, 8 day Elgin I'm thinking of-and things like deck watches and/or chronometers, I think there were one or two 16 size Rockfords indicators that were NOT railroad grade. These are probably rarer and more difficult to find than the railroad grade ones.
 

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Well, I wouldn't go that far. The (modern) Zenith Special Type 20 with Cal. 5011K is 57mm across! But then, the movement is 50mm as well.

What I really find ridiculous is dinner plate sized watches with tiny movements inside. However, I do agree that older pocket watch movements in wrist watches are a little dodgy because of the lack of shock protection.

Hartmut Richter
 
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