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A generic maybe Swiss movement with no shock protection and no identification. Given the appearance, it is either new (which seems unlikely) or in a good state of preservation. The technology level is in general agreement with the supplied dating.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
A generic maybe Swiss movement with no shock protection and no identification. Given the appearance, it is either new (which seems unlikely) or in a good state of preservation. The technology level is in general agreement with the supplied dating.
Thank you for your time and knowledge, Eeeb.
 

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The inside of the outer case has a serial number as well as a number of other data groups scratched around the periphery. The serial number is repeated inside the inner case just above the hinge. The outsides of both cases are unmarked. Any further insight would be appreciated.

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7426B1BB-1E61-4DEE-92DA-5C0FF59CA788.jpeg

FE6E6F8E-1118-4C13-B891-AC9123867C33.jpeg
 

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The 'scratchings' are watchmaker service marks - usually corresponding to the watchmaker's repair tickets. Counting them indicates the watch has probably been serviced at least six times. That's a good sign.

The serial number is actually a case number. Serial numbers are almost always placed on the movement. The parts of cases are sometimes numbered to make sure parts that are known to fit together stay together. With rare exceptions case numbers are only used on pocketwatches.
 

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Again, thank you for your input, Eeeb.

Hey, anyone who can put up with private jet passengers deserves respect! (Did you catch the recent DC-3 resurrection on YouTube?)
 

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looks to be at least pre 1930's since there is no shock proof system. But that is not to say its crap like marcc stated since it looks to be a 15 or 11 jewel movement. the fact that it seems so well preserved is most likely due to the fact that its guilted. guilted movements tend to look newer for a longer period of time. Its def. swiss thats 100% and if there is a brand or serial number it will be stamped on the dial side of the movement. so if you want to get the hands and dial off and take a pic we will be able to better serve you here.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Thank you for your further input, thetrenchdude. It lives in an attractive silver stand which is hallmarked for Chester and 1902. I have no reason to suspect that the stand and watch don’t belong together. I haven’t the confidence or competence to delve beyond what I can see but I intend to have it serviced when any further identification will be revealed.

What power reserve would you expect a movement like this to have? This one has around 30 hours.

I’ve not seen the YouTube clip to which you refer Eeeb but there was an interesting TV programme here which included a restoration project which was completed in time for the aircraft to take part in the massed Dak/DC-3 D-Day commemoration flight earlier this month.
 

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A power reserve of 30 hours is a little on the low side and could indicate that it either needs a service or that the mainspring is weak (possibly damaged/kinked very slightly when it was returned a little unprofessionally to the barrel or something like that). Ca. 40 hours should be more like what you expect and larger PW movements may even exceed that.

Hartmut Richter
 
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