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Discussion Starter #1
A question here for Stowa fans.

I see Stowa have the same watch design available in a polished stainless steel or a brushed matt steel casing.


I tend to play a lot of sports and keep time with my watch. Getting a strike on the watch by a squash racquet still hasn't taught me my lesson! I need the timer for 30 minute court sessions - at last I remember my use for a chronograph lol).

Do you have a preference for either? Any advantages or disadvantages to the finishing? Which is more durable? Or is it purely cosmetic?

Thanks for your thoughts ;)
 

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I would think that the polished version would be repaired more easily b/c if you have to polish out a scratch it won't look completely out of place. If you have to polish a scratch out of the matte watch,you have the problem of getting that matte look back on that spot.
 

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I would think that the polished version would be repaired more easily b/c if you have to polish out a scratch it won't look completely out of place. If you have to polish a scratch out of the matte watch,you have the problem of getting that matte look back on that spot.
Duh... hence you don't polish a matte (brushed) case, instead brush the area again to 'wipe out' out the scratch...

CT
 

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Discussion Starter #4
i don't think that's what Publius meant.

Isn't he saying, that to polish out a scratch from a polished case, is easier, than brushing out a scratch, from a brushed matt case?
 

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Search "Scotchbrite" and "scratch pen" here and see the results of repairing a brushed finish. Search Cape Cod cloths to see the results of getting out a scratch from a polished surface. Search for "watchbandrenew kit" here and on Google to see an option for both.

A brushed finish may be of help to you because it won't show the hairline scratches as much. It's a similar result to the naked eye as far as repairing polished and brushed but a loop will still show you micro-scratches/swirls on a polished finish.

I'd say if you are going to play sports, go for a brushed finish. If you are a bit gentler, a polished, that is if you like them both.

A bead blasted Stowa would serve you well. :)
 

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A brushed finish may be of help to you because it won't show the hairline scratches as much. ... A bead blasted Stowa would serve you well.
I'd take the brushed finish over the polished one. If your watch does get scratched it may not even be all that noticeable if the scratches are oriented in the same or similar direction to the brushed finish. If they're going the wrong way, it doesn't take much to effort with a scratch pen to get rid of it. With a polished surface, every scratch will be noticeable.

Although a bead blasted finish may be even better. Most scratches aren't all that noticeable, and if you do completely scratch up the watch that just changes the texture of the surface a bit - it still looks good. The color of the case is noticeably different. Instead of the silver color you get with a polished or brushed finish, a bead blasted finish will look gray. It's very different than what you normally see from a stainless steel case.

I believe there's a similar finish that's used on other products that should also work well, although I think you'd have to have someone modify the watch yourself. It's something like tumbled or hammered (someone help me if you know the correct term) It's supposed to mask scratches very well.
 

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i don't think that's what Publius meant.

Isn't he saying, that to polish out a scratch from a polished case, is easier, than brushing out a scratch, from a brushed matt case?
No, he isn't saying that... why would he be worried that the polished spot no longer is matte otherwise?
That's why I said you don't polish a matte finish in the first place...
 

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I tend to play a lot of sports and keep time with my watch. Getting a strike on the watch by a squash racquet still hasn't taught me my lesson! I need the timer for 30 minute court sessions - at last I remember my use for a chronograph lol).
Have you considered a dive watch with rotating bezel? You don't need a chrono to time events at 1 minute precision, and dive watches tend to be more rugged.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Have you considered a dive watch with rotating bezel? You don't need a chrono to time events at 1 minute precision, and dive watches tend to be more rugged.
I think you're right - I really shouldn't wear such an expensive watch for such activities!

Unfortunately I'm not a fan of the testosterone look watch. Rugged is good ... so is cheap and replaceable quartz for these things ;)

Brushed metal it is! I think I like the non-bling non-ultra shiny look. If I want attention, I'll dye my hair red or get a mohican lol.
 

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I think you're right - I really shouldn't wear such an expensive watch for such activities!

Unfortunately I'm not a fan of the testosterone look watch. Rugged is good ... so is cheap and replaceable quartz for these things ;)

Brushed metal it is! I think I like the non-bling non-ultra shiny look. If I want attention, I'll dye my hair red or get a mohican lol.
if you want cheap get a G-shock. Cant go wrong and I have seen many people into better watches happen to own a G-shock as well
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I want chrono with class!

But it makes sense to get a cheap G shock or something like that. Maybe an egg timer ;)
 
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