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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve got a lot of scratches on an old speedy case and bracelet and looking for some advice on the best way to polish them out. It's a bit battered so any improvement would be good. Watched some examples on the tube and it seems straight forward! Got a Dremel and some green Dialux polishing compound off the net, the problem is it is like concrete and I can’t get any on the buffing wheel. Anybody used this before and should it be softer than this. I’ll be using a cape cod cloth once I get some of the deep scratches out. Any advice welcomed and appreciated.

 

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...Any advice welcomed and appreciated.
I've had a Dremel for 35 years and I wouldn't even consider using it on an expensive watch, or even a cheap one for that matter.

I would strongly advise you not to learn watch polishing on a watch that has lyre lugs and a dual brushed/polished finish on both the case and bracelet. I won't even mention that it costs several thousand dollars...
 

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I’ve got a lot of scratches on an old speedy case and bracelet and looking for some advice on the best way to polish them out. It's a bit battered so any improvement would be good. Watched some examples on the tube and it seems straight forward! Got a Dremel and some green Dialux polishing compound off the net, the problem is it is like concrete and I can’t get any on the buffing wheel. Anybody used this before and should it be softer than this. I’ll be using a cape cod cloth once I get some of the deep scratches out. Any advice welcomed and appreciated.

Best advice is to leave it to a professional. When you see a video on-line of a professional golfer, baseball player, etc. of course they make it look straightforward, because that's what they do for a living. Just because it looks straightforward doesn't mean it actually is.

If you don't understand how to use polishing compound, then seriously you need to let someone else who knows what they are doing refinish the case for you. Also note that depending on how old your watch is, refinishing may negatively affect the value of the watch...

Cheers, Al
 

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Best advice is to leave it to a professional. When you see a video on-line of a professional golfer, baseball player, etc. of course they make it look straightforward, because that's what they do for a living. Just because it looks straightforward doesn't mean it actually is. If you don't understand how to use polishing compound, then seriously you need to let someone else who knows what they are doing refinish the case for you. Also note that depending on how old your watch is, refinishing may negatively affect the value of the watch... Cheers, Al
Indeed! I think the bracelet we can touch it up ourselves using cape cod polish cloth, 3m scratch pad, and masking tape. However, the case is a different story. Also, in order to polish a watch properly, one should remove the bezel, crystal, and movement.
 

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Hi, We deal with lapping and polishing of components, we might be able to recommend a different micron sized polishing compound. Do you know what material the case and strap are made from?
 

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Best advice is to leave it to a professional. When you see a video on-line of a professional golfer, baseball player, etc. of course they make it look straightforward, because that's what they do for a living. Just because it looks straightforward doesn't mean it actually is.

If you don't understand how to use polishing compound, then seriously you need to let someone else who knows what they are doing refinish the case for you. Also note that depending on how old your watch is, refinishing may negatively affect the value of the watch...

Cheers, Al
This ^^^. Al got in ahead of me to recommend prudence in refinishing one's watch. I'll add that, if the watch has accumulated lots of scuffs and scrapes, it also might be ready for a service. How long has it been since the last one? A professional service includes refinishing, unless - as Al warns - your watch is vintage, in which case refinishing would diminish the value.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi, We deal with lapping and polishing of components, we might be able to recommend a different micron sized polishing compound. Do you know what material the case and strap are made from?
The material is stainless steel case and bracelet. I’ve used polishing tools many times but not familiar with this green compound. For the concerned out there I take great care in what is polished and how, bracelet is removed and areas masked that are satin finish. This is a clean up operation and not a refinish to Omega standard, in fact I’m probably taking less material off than Omega would. The watch was serviced years ago and as many have said I’m not going to service it until it needs it.

Information on compounds very welcome and supplier. Thanks for replies.
 

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The material is stainless steel case and bracelet. I’ve used polishing tools many times but not familiar with this green compound. For the concerned out there I take great care in what is polished and how, bracelet is removed and areas masked that are satin finish. This is a clean up operation and not a refinish to Omega standard, in fact I’m probably taking less material off than Omega would. The watch was serviced years ago and as many have said I’m not going to service it until it needs it.

Information on compounds very welcome and supplier. Thanks for replies.
Taking great care is not enough...you need skill and knowledge in order to refinish properly without doing damage. If you don't know what compound to use or where to buy it, I assume you don't know what buff to use, or what speed to have it running at. And you appear to be planning to do this with the movement in the watch...it all sounds like bad news to me, but it's your watch, so have at it if you like.

Cheers, Al
 

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Taking great care is not enough...you need skill and knowledge in order to refinish properly without doing damage. If you don't know what compound to use or where to buy it, I assume you don't know what buff to use, or what speed to have it running at. And you appear to be planning to do this with the movement in the watch...it all sounds like bad news to me, but it's your watch, so have at it if you like.

Cheers, Al
I'll be waiting for the followup post in about 3 weeks on where to send a watch for service and case restoration. ;)
 

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I just polished an old Doxa Grafic case and made it look brand new which was quite a feat since the watch was made in 1957. It's not as intricate as an Omega case though. It takes time and patience. The Cape Cod stuff is amazing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks to jlanders and mharris660 for your constructive and helpful advice, much appreciated. Cape Cod polishing loth is excellent. To the other forum members who have posted, in their eyes no doubt trying to warn of damage and destruction, thank you for your comments but they are not needed and I will ignore them. Why judge somebody else’s skill, understanding and competence because they ask a question, if you don’t have an answer or the skill yourselves don’t criticise others, and don’t post.

 

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Thanks to jlanders and mharris660 for your constructive and helpful advice, much appreciated.Cape Cod polishing loth is excellent.To the other forum members who have posted, in their eyes no doubt trying to warn of damage and destruction, thank you for your comments but they are not needed and I will ignore them.Why judge somebody else’s skill, understanding and competence because they ask a question, if you don’t have an answer or the skill yourselves don’t criticise others, and don’t post.
I recommend you wait until you finish polishing school. But whatever route you choose, be sure to finish the watch entirely before deciding if it's working.

You going to put that Dremel in a vice? Else you must be Dremel Ninja.
 

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Well, to be fair to the OP, I did use a (faux) Dremel on a watch band once. It was to "size" a cheap mesh bracelet and I had to cut off some links. Worked okay for that. I'd be terrified of trying to use it for polishing.
 

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Thanks to jlanders and mharris660 for your constructive and helpful advice, much appreciated. Cape Cod polishing loth is excellent. To the other forum members who have posted, in their eyes no doubt trying to warn of damage and destruction, thank you for your comments but they are not needed and I will ignore them. Why judge somebody else’s skill, understanding and competence because they ask a question, if you don’t have an answer or the skill yourselves don’t criticise others, and don’t post.

Well, being a professional watchmaker and having been trained on refinishing techniques by Omega directly (and Rolex as well) I can assure you I have the knowledge and skills. I do this for a living. I have also had to repair so many bad "home polish jobs" that I get tired of fixing surfaces that have been messed up by someone using a Dremel to make it shiny...

The fact is most people who do their own polishing don't even know what damage they are doing...making surfaces uneven in the process. But hey it looks shiny after they are done, so they must be experts!

You can't simply post a couple of lines on a forum and through that teach someone how to polish - it needs direct hands on training to learn this. Polishing and refinishing is a skill just like any other that takes time to learn. At the very least you should practice on something else before you take the Dremel to your watch. And the diamond compound recommended is not something typically used in watch refinishing (but neither is a Dremel)...

Based on your responses so far, I doubt you will heed the advice to leave it to a professional, so once again good luck.

Cheers, Al
 

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Forgot to mention. If the polish is "hard as concrete" you'll need to use the bash/caveman technique. Just slam the polish down upon the watch and Demel repeatedly. You should be able to get a little on there. Open flame is another good loosening agent.
 

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To the other forum members who have posted, in their eyes no doubt trying to warn of damage and destruction, thank you for your comments but they are not needed and I will ignore them.Why judge somebody else’s skill, understanding and competence because they ask a question, if you don’t have an answer or the skill yourselves don’t criticise others, and don’t post.
You've been on this forum for 10 months and have a whopping six posts ... and you then denigrate the helpful advice offered by seasoned veterans who have far more experience than you can imagine. You sound like a fun addition to WUSOF.

don't confuse with facts.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
As previously said thanks for all the replies some containing the sarcastic comments of only having six posts! I really didn't think it was a competition. In line with the 'expert' comment I've revised the plan. Using the very helpful 'caveman' approach decided to use the old B&D with 2" close stitched buff, bit more control.
 
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