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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi friends,

For those of you who know me, you are no doubt aware that dress watches are my "thing". I have a sincere appreciation for all Soviet timepieces, but I am typically less interested in amphibias, divers, scubas, snorkles, goggles, flippers................wait a minute.

It should come as now surprise, then, that when I see a fine example of a gorgeous Soviet dress watch, my antennae are tuned and the hunt begins. When I first began collecting, I stumbled upon a fellow forum member's drool-worthy Flickr page and was drawn to one example in particular: a 21-jewel Poljot dress watch. On first glance, this watch could be mistaken for a 17-jewel 2409 or 23-jewel 2209 due to the familiar dial design. However, this watch is unusual for two reasons.

First, the 21-jewel movement is rather uncommon. Visibly, it looks akin to the 17-jewel 2409 with the addition of an a shock-protected jewel on the main bridge. It is a different caliber, however: 2409A. I have only seen this unusual movement on export watches -- if anyone is aware of a domestic example with a 2409A, I would be most interested to know.

Second, this watch is labeled "Foreign" at the base of the dial where one would typically expect to see "Made in USSR". As I understand it, different countries have different labeling laws for imported goods. For some, the country must be explicitly stated, while for others, "Foreign" is enough to indicate the product is not locally produced. Soviet-era watches exported to the UK almost always bear the "Made in USSR" designation at the bottom of the dial while domestic Soviet watches are typically labeled "Сделано в СССР". Therefore, my best guess is that this watch was an export model intended for a country outside of the UK, likely somewhere in Eastern Europe(?).

The overall condition is really quite excellent. The dial will be familiar to many of you as it resembles the "de luxe" slash dial quite closely, though is a bit smaller overall. I'm not a big fan of the thick crystal, but in the chance that it's original, I'm not in any big hurry to change it.

Thanks to W. Stockburn's Flickr page for the motivation -- I'm glad to finally check another one off the list.

Enjoy the photos :)

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Now that is a beautiful and rare version indeed! I have a cousin on its way, a 16 jewel 2408 version. I was told that it is a 40mm case, but will find out when it arrives. Dress watches are nice, and of interest to me as well.



All the very best to you, and good luck hunting!

Dusring the Cuban Missile Crisis I was a paratrooper in Germany, and so have some interest in Soviet era para watches. Here is one with a brass case and funky bezel, and I like it for the hiistory, made 1950's 60's.



All the very best to you, and happy hunting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Now that is a beautiful and rare version indeed! I have a cousin on its way, a 16 jewel 2408 version. I was told that it is a 40mm case, but will find out when it arrives. Dress watches are nice, and of interest to me as well.

All the very best to you, and good luck hunting!
Thank you for sharing, Klink! That Poljot 2408 is one of my favorites. I have written about it here. The case is 35.5mm in diameter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice catch. I think that's the one I was watching with bidnapper ready to pounce until it disappeared. Glad it found a truly appreciative owner |>
For watches you really want, it never hurts to make an offer ;) Many sellers are willing to end an auction early if they feel the price is right. This seller was looking for around $120, but I talked him down to $85 shipped. Perhaps I could have had it for less if the auction had run its course, but I doubt it.

Thanks for your kind words...you're a good sport!
 

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I feel lucky! It is fairly easy to figure out that you have a 'thing' for watches.. I suppose that I share in that to a small degree.. and I find the Soviet and Russian watches to be very nice for a multitude of reasons.. lol, last night found me drooling all over my keyboard while looking at a dress watch, a President featuring Vladimir Putin.. : )

Thank you for sharing the review of the 2408, made my day!

All the very best to you,

Life is Good!

Klink
 

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Very nice indeed, and very interesting! I actually really like the thick crystal - gives the piece a bit of extra beef! Enjoy and wear it in good health.
 

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"Foreign" was compulsory for the UK, to conceal German parts once, or Soviet later on.
"Made in USS"R for all export, generally.
Сделано в СССР for the domestic USSR market.
Full stop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
"Foreign" was compulsory for the UK, to conceal German parts once, or Soviet later on.
"Made in USS"R for all export, generally.
Сделано в СССР for the domestic USSR market.
Full stop.
I was aware of the regulation in the UK more recently, but I don't think the same rules existed in the '60s and '70s, or else all Sekonda watches would have been marked "Foreign" rather than "Made in USSR"...right? None of my Sekonda watches are marked Foreign. In fact, none of my other watches, period, are marked Foreign. So surely this is a more unusual instance than simply a watch imported to the UK, no?
 

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Nice dress piece, I think its nice to have a dress piece (in your case lots lol) I own a couple myself, my first mechanical after the digital and quartz watch era was over was a dress piece and will never sell it.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nice dress piece, I think its nice to have a dress piece (in your case lots lol) I own a couple myself, my first mechanical after the digital and quartz watch era was over was a dress piece and will never sell it.
What do you mean lots?? Are you suggesting it's not normal to have hundreds of Soviet-era dress watches taking over one's living room???

;)

I've always been a fan of the Seamaster. Overpriced, I think, given what I'm used to paying for Russians, but the styling is spot on. I've got one and love it, though it doesn't get enough wrist time.
 

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I was aware of the regulation in the UK more recently, but I don't think the same rules existed in the '60s and '70s, or else all Sekonda watches would have been marked "Foreign" rather than "Made in USSR"...right? None of my Sekonda watches are marked Foreign. In fact, none of my other watches, period, are marked Foreign. So surely this is a more unusual instance than simply a watch imported to the UK, no?
I have a couple Poljots and have owned several others in the past (all happen to be stainless steel) that have "foreign" on the back but "made in USSR" on the dial. I also have a 21 jewel Poljot marked as yours. They were all bought from sellers in the UK. I don't think this is a coincidence. My information is that these "foreign Poljots" were a use of the dial name "Poljot" before the First Moscow change to all "Poljot" was begun and were made for the UK market. I would expect the establishment of the Sekonda line came later and the "foreign" markings was discontinued altogether.
 

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I bought my seamaster for £75 so cant complain about the price dial is a bit shot but you will pay a lot more for that piece today, but the movements in these are gorgeous with the rose/copper finish and swan neck micro adjustment for the timing. But like you said you the Russian pricing is just too fantastic to ignore, I see a few of those deluxe on here and do look nice.

P.S I have a clock with the word foreign at the bottom of the dial. The movement in this clock is an Junghans German made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have a couple Poljots and have owned several others in the past (all happen to be stainless steel) that have "foreign" on the back but "made in USSR" on the dial. I also have a 21 jewel Poljot marked as yours. They were all bought from sellers in the UK. I don't think this is a coincidence. My information is that these "foreign Poljots" were a use of the dial name "Poljot" before the First Moscow change to all "Poljot" was begun and were made for the UK market. I would expect the establishment of the Sekonda line came later and the "foreign" markings was discontinued altogether.
This explanation makes sense to me, thank you for your insight!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I bought my seamaster for £75 so cant complain about the price dial is a bit shot but you will pay a lot more for that piece today, but the movements in these are gorgeous with the rose/copper finish and swan neck micro adjustment for the timing. But like you said you the Russian pricing is just too fantastic to ignore, I see a few of those deluxe on here and do look nice.

P.S I have a clock with the word foreign at the bottom of the dial. The movement in this clock is an Junghans German made.
£75 is a steal! It seems most Seamasters sell for $350 and up (sometimes WAY up) nowadays.

If Paul's analysis is true, then your clock was likely sold in the UK during the time when "Foreign" was an acceptable designation for imported goods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have a couple Poljots and have owned several others in the past (all happen to be stainless steel) that have "foreign" on the back but "made in USSR" on the dial. I also have a 21 jewel Poljot marked as yours. They were all bought from sellers in the UK. I don't think this is a coincidence. My information is that these "foreign Poljots" were a use of the dial name "Poljot" before the First Moscow change to all "Poljot" was begun and were made for the UK market. I would expect the establishment of the Sekonda line came later and the "foreign" markings was discontinued altogether.
And by the way, my watch was also bought from a UK seller.
 

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Purchased an identical Poljot 2409a "Foreign" in a Shrewsbury antique shop today in similar, possibly marginally better condition with a period correct rolled gold Fixoflex expanding bracelet for £25 or $37 for you lot across the pond !

No markings on the movement other than 21 jewels, 2409A, 88028. Unsurprisingly, there's no factory logo.
I'd guess manufacturing date to be sometime between the Cuban missile crisis and 1966 when Sekonda started volume sales of Russian watches in the UK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Purchased an identical Poljot 2409a "Foreign" in a Shrewsbury antique shop today in similar, possibly marginally better condition with a period correct rolled gold Fixoflex expanding bracelet for £25 or $37 for you lot across the pond !

No markings on the movement other than 21 jewels, 2409A, 88028. Unsurprisingly, there's no factory logo.
I'd guess manufacturing date to be sometime between the Cuban missile crisis and 1966 when Sekonda started volume sales of Russian watches in the UK.
Well, you aren't just going to leave us hanging without a photo, are you?!
 

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Well, you aren't just going to leave us hanging without a photo, are you?!
New camera arrived 16.45 today, 30/12. Photos will follow once I have charged the battery and figured how it works. Previously used Fuji and Lumix, gone Olympus mirrorless this time......
 
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