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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An acquaintance of mine is looking to sell this vintage Automatic, but I don't know him well enough to trust 100%. Is there any way to know if it is real, and if it is, what would be a fair value? (obviously looking for a VERY rough estimate.)



Thank you!
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for your thoughts. So I would have to open it up to check the movement number, correct? Would a redial drastically impact value?

Thanks again!
John
 

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Obvious redial. No way to tell if there are any Omega parts in this thing without popping the back.

Once open, take a note of the serial and movement number on the movement and the watch number on the inside of the case back.

With that number, you can find more info on the database
 

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There are 2 numbers that matter for omegas. One is the model number, usually written on the inside of the case back. With that one you can search in the database.
The other number is the serial of the movement. You can use it to establish the date of manufacture. There is a table with serials by year of manufacture. You can find such table here Omega Serial Numbers By Year...
On the movement there is the caliber number. Each case model could have its specific calibers.
 

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Yes, definitely a redial. Higher res pics would show that pretty clearly, but the wobbly lettering is obvious from this poor pic.

The subdial doesn't look right, as well (the length of the hand compared to the marker locations), but once you have the reference number from inside the caseback, you can search on other examples on the web and see what it should look like - it's possible there are others like this.

Generally, a redial has a big impact on vintage watch value, as it will never be collectible with that dial. It can still be worth wearing if you like it and the price is right, though watches of this era tend to be small.
 

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Yes, definitely a redial. Higher res pics would show that pretty clearly, but the wobbly lettering is obvious from this poor pic.

The subdial doesn't look right, as well (the length of the hand compared to the marker locations), but once you have the reference number from inside the caseback, you can search on other examples on the web and see what it should look like - it's possible there are others like this.

Generally, a redial has a big impact on vintage watch value, as it will never be collectible with that dial. It can still be worth wearing if you like it and the price is right, though watches of this era tend to be small.
Yep, the hands are certainly not original (and that seconds hand is far too long) and the whole subdial printing seems a bit off center but that could be the angle of the photo.
 
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