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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

So I bought a Hamilton Valiant a couple of months ago and love the watch. I swapped out the buckle for a Hamilton OEM deployant clasp and couldn't be happier. I get regular compliments on the watch as well.

I wear the watch Monday to Friday for at least eight hours each day. On Saturdays I will wear it on average four to five hours. However, when I go to wear it on Sunday or occasionally Monday morning, it has stopped. I wind it fully and repeat the pattern above, but it seems to stop if I don't wear it for at least eight hours one day. So, the power reserve isn't what I would expect. I was thinking that what I will do from now on when I take it off after only wearing it for a few hours, I will wind it 10 or 20 times to keep it from stopping. Is this advisable? Or, does the watch need to be serviced?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Wind it up about 35 to 40 times and see what you get.

When you wear it, are you mostly sedentary or are you active.
 

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Sounds to me like you have a problem, you should be getting 40 hours at least after 8 hours wrist time!! get it checked out.


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Here's what you need to do to evaluate both your power reserve and whether your watch is self-winding properly.

First, evaluate the full power reserve of your watch by winding it fully (say 60 turns to be safe, you can't over wind it) and then set it down and when it finally dies calculate how many hours it ran when fully wound (your power reserve).

Next, evaluate if your watch is self-winding properly. To do this you will power the watch up fully and then see if it stays fully wound through normal wear. Wind the watch about 60 times to fully power it, then wear it on your wrist for a few days without removing it. After about 3-4 days of wear remove the watch and note the time, then put it down and when it finally dies calculate how many hours it took to wind down. If the watch is self-winding properly it will have maintained a full power reserve and the wind-down time will match your original full power reserve measurement. If the watch is not self-winding properly, then it won't maintain (or build) it's power reserve and the measured wind-down time will be less than your original full power reserve measure.

Some watches may take days to build a full power reserve through wear alone, so you can't judge a watch by how long it takes to power up. What you need to do is fully power it up manually and then see if the watch can maintain the power reserve with normal (full time) wear.

Easy peazy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here's what you need to do to evaluate both your power reserve and whether your watch is self-winding properly.

First, evaluate the full power reserve of your watch by winding it fully (say 60 turns to be safe, you can't over wind it) and then set it down and when it finally dies calculate how many hours it ran when fully wound (your power reserve).

Next, evaluate if your watch is self-winding properly. To do this you will power the watch up fully and then see if it stays fully wound through normal wear. Wind the watch about 60 times to fully power it, then wear it on your wrist for a few days without removing it. After about 3-4 days of wear remove the watch and note the time, then put it down and when it finally dies calculate how many hours it took to wind down. If the watch is self-winding properly it will have maintained a full power reserve and the wind-down time will match your original full power reserve measurement. If the watch is not self-winding properly, then it won't maintain (or build) it's power reserve and the measured wind-down time will be less than your original full power reserve measure.

Easy peazy.
Thanks very much for the replies. I have never wound it beyond 40 times, as I didn't want to do any damage. I do sit behind a desk most of the time, but my arm moves a fair amount. I will try what you have suggested and will wind it 60 times first.
 

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You can't over wind an automatic because the winding mechanism will disengage once it is fully wound, and after that you're not winding the mainspring any further. I suggest 60 turns just to be sure it's fully wound for the purposes of measurement.
 

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Re, power reserve.
I bought a new breitling a week ago and was told by the salesperson that the power reserve would be 40 hours. However the watch has little more than 15 hours reserve. l read with interest other comments .... Is this something I need to worry about?.
 

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Re, power reserve.
I bought a new breitling a week ago and was told by the salesperson that the power reserve would be 40 hours. However the watch has little more than 15 hours reserve. l read with interest other comments .... Is this something I need to worry about?.
Yup.

Did you power it up fully with at least 60 winds, and the put it down to check how long it would run?
 
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