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My understanding from listening to one of the taped interviews with Sylvain Dolla (CEO of Hamilton Watch Company) last year, the development of a Hamilton GMT H movement is in the works; however, he did not specify when the GMT H-movement will be released.

Note: Hamilton will be releasing one or two limited editions of their Broadway lineup supposedly later this year. One of these limited edition models will be a GMT model — I would not be a bit surprised if the Broadway GMT Limited Edition model will have the GMT H-movement.
 

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Sounds like the movement already exists, just a matter of Hamilton creating a model for it.

The Swatch Group entry level brands do little more than marketing and design. The movements all come from ETA.
 
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The Swatch Group entry level brands do little more than marketing and design. The movements all come from ETA.
That is your opinion and you have stated it before.

Below is an excerpt from Hamilton's website on their H movements:

Being so close to movement experts has allowed Hamilton to take the finest quality movements created by our sister company ETA - the largest producer of Swiss made watch movements in the world - and adapt them to create our own customized calibers. This approach allows us to create movements specifically to fit the design of our watches, however innovative or challenging they may be.

https://www.hamiltonwatch.com/en-int/hamilton-swiss-movements

Furthermore, Sylvain Dolla in another taped interview, while talking about the launch of the Chrono-Matic 50, talked about Hamilton, in conjunction with ETA, are working on another chronograph movement similar to an earlier Chronomatic movement developed in conjunction with Heuer, Dubois Dépraz, Hamilton-Buren, and Breitling.

This movement like all of Hamilton's other H movements, Hamilton has proprietary IP rights to this movement, while Tissot, Certina and Mido do not have access to the IP on this H movement or any of Hamilton's other H movement. Just as Hamilton does not have access to the IP on Tissot and Certina Powermantic80 movements nor Mido's Caliber 80 movements.
 

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I doubt Hamilton's intellectual property rights to the H movements extends much further than the customized rotors.

Nice watches though. :)
 

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Being so close to movement experts has allowed Hamilton to take the finest quality movements created by our sister company ETA - the largest producer of Swiss made watch movements in the world - and adapt them to create our own customized calibers. This approach allows us to create movements specifically to fit the design of our watches, however innovative or challenging they may be.

https://www.hamiltonwatch.com/en-int/hamilton-swiss-movements

Furthermore, Sylvain Dolla in another taped interview, while talking about the launch of the Chrono-Matic 50, talked about Hamilton, in conjunction with ETA, are working on another chronograph movement similar to an earlier Chronomatic movement developed in conjunction with Heuer, Dubois Dépraz, Hamilton-Buren, and Breitling.

This movement like all of Hamilton's other H movements, Hamilton has proprietary IP rights to this movement, while Tissot, Certina and Mido do not have access to the IP on this H movement or any of Hamilton's other H movement. Just as Hamilton does not have access to the IP on Tissot and Certina Powermantic80 movements nor Mido's Caliber 80 movements.
All of that is market speak. I'd love to see technical details of a customization (besides the rotor design) that Hamilton has made to an ETA movement that is uniquely theirs.
 

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That is your opinion and you have stated it before.

Below is an excerpt from Hamilton's website on their H movements:

Being so close to movement experts has allowed Hamilton to take the finest quality movements created by our sister company ETA - the largest producer of Swiss made watch movements in the world - and adapt them to create our own customized calibers. This approach allows us to create movements specifically to fit the design of our watches, however innovative or challenging they may be.

https://www.hamiltonwatch.com/en-int/hamilton-swiss-movements

Furthermore, Sylvain Dolla in another taped interview, while talking about the launch of the Chrono-Matic 50, talked about Hamilton, in conjunction with ETA, are working on another chronograph movement similar to an earlier Chronomatic movement developed in conjunction with Heuer, Dubois Dépraz, Hamilton-Buren, and Breitling.

This movement like all of Hamilton's other H movements, Hamilton has proprietary IP rights to this movement, while Tissot, Certina and Mido do not have access to the IP on this H movement or any of Hamilton's other H movement. Just as Hamilton does not have access to the IP on Tissot and Certina Powermantic80 movements nor Mido's Caliber 80 movements.
Reads like a bunch of marketing hocus-pocus to me.
 

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So Swatch developed a true (not office) version of it's powermatic 80 movement....
No where in any of the literature I have read, is it explained that the new Swatch GMT is a “true” GMT with a jumping hour hand, as opposed to a jumping GMT hand as in the 2893, whether Hamilton's version or Certina and Mido versions. Please provide a link to information about the “true” nature of the Hamilton GMT.

I did learn that the new version Hamilton chrono movement keeps the faster 4kHz beat rate that the P-80 and other newer ETA have reduced to 3kHz to obtain the longer PR, which was good news for the chronograph. Wonder why they could not keep the smooth beat rate on the rest of the line, if it worked for the chrono.
 

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These look interesting, as a Navitimer fan love the slide rule bezel. I wish they would have used arabics instead of the stick markers for a more instrument/pilot look though.
I see what you mean. If I was to take a guess, maybe Hamilton was trying to find symmetry with the Aviation Converter Collection. In that, to use Arabic numbers on the Chrono dial would have resulted in further cluttering the dial in an already busy dial too start with.

On another note, the GMT's sunburst blue dial is quite intriguing. And maybe by using indices instead of Arabic numbers on the dial allows one to take in the blue sunburst pattern more so than if they had gone with Arabic numbers — just my thought on the subject matter.
 

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I have been waiting for a true GMT at a reasonable price. Now let’s see if someone offers it in 40mm. Is this too much to ask???

Edit- Both Certina and Mido have released this movement in 43mm and 42mm. Now that it seems Swatch Group has come out with a true GMT movement I predict Hamilton will release it in one of their 42mm cases with the unfortunate 52mm lug to lug length. This seems to be the case they are tooled up for the most and their go-to size for the most part. Frustrating!
 

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No where in any of the literature I have read, is it explained that the new Swatch GMT is a “true” GMT with a jumping hour hand, as opposed to a jumping GMT hand as in the 2893, whether Hamilton's version or Certina and Mido versions. Please provide a link to information about the “true” nature of the Hamilton GMT.

I did learn that the new version Hamilton chrono movement keeps the faster 4kHz beat rate that the P-80 and other newer ETA have reduced to 3kHz to obtain the longer PR, which was good news for the chronograph. Wonder why they could not keep the smooth beat rate on the rest of the line, if it worked for the chrono.
It is in German but the video clearly shows a jumping hour hand.

https://youtu.be/uAa1IGv_EY0
 

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Discussion Starter #16
No where in any of the literature I have read, is it explained that the new Swatch GMT is a “true” GMT with a jumping hour hand, as opposed to a jumping GMT hand as in the 2893, whether Hamilton's version or Certina and Mido versions. Please provide a link to information about the “true” nature of the Hamilton GMT.
.
Given I asked if such a thing existed - was that actually aimed at me?


Anyone in regards to the Mido version - detailed review of it here:

https://isochrono.com/the-mido-multifort-dual-time-an-affordable-way-to-a-real-gmt/
 
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