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I want to purchase my first PVD watch and wanted to know how sturdy is the PVD coating. Can the PVD coating be easily damaged and if so is their a solution to buff or repair it?

Thanks to all who respond

Rav
 

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There are a number of different methods and coatings, but in general it's pretty robust. I've seen some that can show light streaks or smudges where things have banged against it (not actual scratches, which are harder to put on). Not typically easy to repair in spots, would probably have to send to someone to redo.
 

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The best I can describe is that PVD is more sturdy than paint but less sturdy than say, a solid metal surface. It is really a thin layer of metal, and if you damage it, the only repair is to re-PVD it.
 

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It has a higher scratch resistance then Stainless Steel.. so its less likely to scratch, but you will scratch it eventually.. and it doesnt buff out. Thats part of the look though, weathered / distressed PVD looks cool.
 

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The bottom line is - yes, it will scratch. And no, you can't really fix it. So when it does scratch, you'll see stainless steel. It really bothers me - so much that I won't buy another carbon watch anytime soon.
 

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I have a MM PVD'd watch and I bought it with a minor scratch. If I PVD it again, it will most certainty scratch. I have decided to DLC the watch Diamond Like Coating which is considerably more scratch resistant than PVD and more expoensive.

The bottom line is - yes, it will scratch. And no, you can't really fix it. So when it does scratch, you'll see stainless steel. It really bothers me - so much that I won't buy another carbon watch anytime soon.
 

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I have a MM PVD'd watch and I bought it with a minor scratch. If I PVD it gain, it will most certainty scratch. I have decided to DLC the watch Diamond Like Coating which is considerably more scratch resistant than PVD and more expoensive.
I thought DLC stood for Diamond Like Carbon. Can anybody confirm which of the two it is?
 

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PVD is the process for applying the material and not the substrate.. typical PVD is done with a carbon coating, but it can be subsituted for a diamond like carbon coating... beware, cheaply done DLC.. It has a vickers rating close to a diamond, but if its prone to chipping since its so hard. There are several DLC Ball watches that are now chipping so these coating arent all created equal. A case must be bead blasted first in order to properly DLC a watch. Chipping is 100X worse then a scratch in PVD.. which looks cool to me.

The most akward state for a PVD watch is when it gets its first or second scratch.. once they start to accumulated, and you have deeper scratches the watch will start building character.. now imagine this worn millitary piece of equipment on a nice vintage ammo box strap..stunningly cool.
I thought DLC stood for Diamond Like Carbon. Can anybody confirm which of the two it is?
 

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The PVD coating put on watches is "decorative" meaning it is thin, meaning it is not very durable. The only way to fix PVD is to re-apply it.

There are tool coatings of PVD that are incredibly durable but the application temperature is too high for watch parts, or so I'm told.
 

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DLC stands for Diamond Like Carbon. The reason they named it this is due to the crystal structure. Carbon can form several structures including the unique Diamond structure. I forget the details but the diamond structure has some additional atoms over simple cubic as well as something the crystalographers call 120 deg symmetry. This means that the carbon is deposited and forms a structure much closer to diamond than other allowable carbon structures. DLC is very hard and abrasion resistant. No idea how "brittle" it is. I would suspect that it is not too brittle as it is very common to be used as a coating on razor blades to keep them sharp. Recall they flex everytime you press on them so........

like other dep methods any damage would require reprocessing in a chamber.
 
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