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Is a quartz heirloom worthy?

  • Yes

  • No

  • Maybe

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Discussion Starter #1
As the title reads, would you consider a quartz watch to be heirloom worthy? Why, or why not?
 

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Since I would worry about longevity and serviceability decades down the line I don't think I would intentionally acquire one with that intention in mind, but if I already own one or was passed one onto I wouldn't hesitate passing it on, if that makes any sense.
 

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:cry: Yes, the Fairchild I purchased at the company store in 1980, but I smashed it into a post at Disneyland in 83; tossed
it about 15 years later.
 

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Many of the 1980's Seiko Quartz Chronographs could be considered heirlooms. Quartz's biggest issues are parts availablity, batteries, and watchmakers who can service them. I certainly consider my Seiko Sports 100 Moonphase chrono not only an instant classic but ans heirloom quality watch (if it can continue to be maintained in the future). Rolex and Patek both produced high end quartz watches and if I understand what GS is doing with some of their movements, they'd qualify too.
My mid-80's Seiko with its excellent quartz movement:
 

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A watch as an heirloom to me has little to nothing to do with movement or monetary value.
It has to do with who had it or why it was given.
One of my watches that I will not sell is a cheap timex expedition analog. Was gift to me from my father and on my wrist when both of my children were born, it means more tome than any patek or AP.

I do understand the value of a nice piece to pass on and have a few watches with more craftsmanship but its the stories and people that make it not the material itself alone.
 

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Glad to read some of the replies. An heirloom isn’t defined by its price but it’s value, and meaning to you. My wife owns several high end pieces but still wears the Rotary quartz-battery watch she inherited from her aunt. Given to the lady by her employer in 1985 it’s got the most beautiful engraving on the back. My better half has owned it for the last 10-odd years; it’s unlikely it will outlast her, or that she will bequeath it to anyone else but as long as it runs ...
 

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It seems like maybe the question is really, assuming my child (or whatever) will cherish this item because it was mine, should I get myself a quartz or an auto?
 

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I certainly would consider my GS SBGP007 with 9F quartz movement every bit as heirloom-worthy as any of my other watches. I cherish it because it is a super-accurate quartz, housed inside a great watch, so why wouldn't my heirs?
 
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I certainly would consider my GS SBGP007 with 9F quartz movement every bit as heirloom-worthy as any of my other watches. I cherish it because it is a super-accurate quartz, housed inside a great watch, so why wouldn't my heirs?
With their recommended / estimated service interval of 50 years, battery replacement every 3 years, adjustable for quartz drift, and other features for longevity, I would completely agree.

IMHO 9F GS watches have the build quality to endure for a lifetime and longer. To me that has the hallmark of an heirloom piece. Of course everything and anything can be an heirloom to the next generation, but wouldn't it be better if it had the build quality to endure?
 

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I can never picture myself getting a quartz watch with the intention of passing it down unless it is a nice one from like Grand seiko. If enough memory is made with the watch, I would consider passing it down for someone to remember me by.
 

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A resounding yes to your question from me. My late Irish grandad was a rear gunner on Halifax bombers during WWII and survived 27 (I think that was the number) bombing missions over Germany. He was and always will be a hero to me.

When he died in 2010 I was given, amongst other things, his watch. It's a cheap and cheerful Lorus quartz. The watch is intrinsically worth absolutely nothing. To me, it's priceless and I wouldn't part with it for any money.
 
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