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I don't think they hate it outright. They just prefer mechanical watches.

Quartz watches have superior accuracy over mechanical watches and are lower cost when it comes to manufacture. A mechanical watch is perceived as a feat of engineering, and although it may lose 1-2 seconds a day over its lifetime, it's a pretty impressive record for something that is regulated mechanically.

Quartz watches, regulated by the oscillation of a quart crystal, need a battery change every couple of years. Accuracy
remains consistently excellent.

I have a couple of Casio G-Shocks, one of which is radio controlled. These have their own place. I think what frustrates some people (including me) is when people go out and purchase a premium brand (eg Omega) with a quartz movement. It just doesn't make any sense.
 

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. A mechanical watch is perceived as a feat of engineering, and although it may lose 1-2 seconds a day over its lifetime, it's a pretty impressive record for something that is regulated mechanically.
1-2 seconds? If a mechanical watch averages within -4 to +6 seconds a day it can be certified by the COSC as a certified chronometer. 1-2 seconds sounds more like a quartz watch, not a mechanical one.

Some of the higher end quartz watches from Omega & Rolex offer shock-protection and thermo-regulation. One other thing to add about quartz jobs is that aside from battery changes, they don't require as much service or maintenance than their mechanical counterparts.
 

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Hi Phrooq. I'm not sure I'll be able to make sense buying a so called 'premium brand' watch with quartz movement, but I'll have a go from my own experience. I own two Omega watches, one with a quartz movement and one with an automatic movement. The reason I wear the latter is obvious - the craftmanship, quality of the automatic movement, etc.

I own the quartz Omega simply for this reason: I love the look, feel and finish of Omega watches but, in certain circumstances, I am a stickler for accuracy. I find this really useful for going to work, meeting people, etc. Obviously a few seconds each day doesn't really make much of a difference but I like the security of being able to rely on the accruarcy of a quartz watch when appropriate (I appreciate batteries expire but decent quartz watches also give advance notice of this as well).

I tend to wear my quartz Omega for work and other practical things and my automatic more as a dress watch when I'm socialising. This is when I don't feel my curious urge to have such super-accurate time!

I know people will ask why don't I just wear a cheaper quartz rather than a 'premium brand' and, for me, it really does just comes down to the fact I love the look and feel of the Omega. I guess I've just not found another one along the way that I prefer. However, I do wear a £7 casio that I use for running! :)

I guess I'm simply a pedant regarding time under certain circumstances and that it's probably quite a stange and personal reason, but I thought I'd share it nevertheless!
 

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I wear mechanicals exclusively, mostly automatics.

Why?

Mechanical watches are EMP proof. You never know when that will come in handy.
 

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For me, there are a few reasons why I prefer mechanicals over quartz: First is the engineering element that others have discussed. To me, it's amazing that someone can build a tiny little machine which oscillates over 28 thousand times each hour, and is presice enough that over an entire day, (28,800 * 24 hours), the watch is still within a couple of seconds of perfect. That's pretty cool, in my estimation.

I also really like that my mechanicals and I have something of a symbiotic relationship: they don't work unless I'm around to impart energy to them, either through a winding stem or through my own movement. This gives me a little more of a sense of the watch as something of a living thing, with an escapement that reminds me a little of a tiny beating heart.

I am also into movements, and to me, most quartz movements make me think more of the video card in my computer rather than something that feels great on my wrist. I think I'm not entirely alone in this: how many quartz watches have display backs?

If this interest were only about accuracy, none of us would really need to be here, as you can get GPS accurate time from a cell phone, a computer, or dozens of other sources in daily life. So this is something that is absolutely emotional and personal to each one of us.

Enjoy!
 

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The two reasons I see that I have trouble putting a lot of stock in:
1. The batter will fail. Don't want to take it to get service.
The fact of the matter is if you have something better than a 7S26 you are probably sending it in for service every year or two anyway as you want to make sure it lasts. A battery will last 2+ years so why not take the occasional battery replacement for a lower cost over the more expensive serviceing of the mechanical.

2. EMP pulses
Yes they can kill your quartz. They will leave your mechanical magnitized and inaccurate until you can get it demagged. What most don't say is that EMP may leave you dead, you see your heart works via electrical impulses as well. If your dead I don't think you'll give a rat's behind as to what you've got on your wrist.

Now liking a mechanical for it's machining, well that I see as somewhat valid. Although ,at the end of the day you've paid a premium price for something that is less accurate than something that could be had a lower cost and is by all measures more durable and trouble free.

I would take a quartz Rolex or Omega long before a mechanical.
 

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Well, I like Quartz.

'Specially with Citizen's Eco-Drive (highly underrated if you ask me; they have some fine models -- can anyone REALLY argue with the Eco-Zilla as a dive watch? That thing frightens great white sharks if you ask me :-d ), the whole "quartz needs battery" argument begins to wane.

I've come across numerous sources that indicate along the lines of, "oh, well, quartz watches don't share the same artistry as mechanicals and automatics." I must respectfully disagree. Sure, it's painstaking to design and create a great mechanical or automatic watch; but, if the effect of accuracy can't included in an argument of "the art of watches," well, that's like hoping the word "red" never gets mentioned in a conversation about apples. Last I checked shouldn't a watch help you "be on time"? We like great-looking watches with great material, but, let's not forget that a $5 watch that can be more accurate than a $500,000 devalues the latter in a significant way, methinks (granted, most of us here end up choosing a watch [or “end up choosing watches”] somewhere in the middle of that range).

If for no other reason than accuracy, quartz seemed to have been destined for watches. Quick! Name one item other than a watch that a lot of folks can associate with "quartz" (be honest). Yeah, I can't either. OK, now try the same thing with "mechanical" or "automatic" -- with the former, you might get a bunch of responses ("car," "robot," "machine"); with the latter, you could also get a bunch of responses -- "pistol," "cake mixer," "car" [again!], "weekly salary," "conveyor belt."

For the record, I like both quartz and automatics. But, I like Citizen's Eco-Drive best. Clean, nice, conservative designs (with material that all watch afficionadoes can appreciate), feeds off the sun or other light source, and accurate thus far.
 

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Personally, I find it tough to love a piece of electronics.

When I did my electronics apprenticeship, one of the first things we did was design and build a simple hour/minute/second timer. Whoopie-ding. Sure, a quartz watch works well, and may be placed in a really whizzy case, but it's still a little electronic gadget that is ultimately disposable. If it goes wrong, you throw it away and replace it. You_can't_ repair it, at least not in any way that makes sense.

A mechanical... A human hand has touched every part of it, and human skill is required when it has to be repaired or serviced. Each watch will have its own unique characteristics, no matter how much care and attention is devoted to making them exactly right. You have to care for them just so to get optimum performance from the. Mechanical watches are individuals...just like we are...
 

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2. EMP pulses
Yes they can kill your quartz. They will leave your mechanical magnitized and inaccurate until you can get it demagged. What most don't say is that EMP may leave you dead, you see your heart works via electrical impulses as well. If your dead I don't think you'll give a rat's behind as to what you've got on your wrist.
Not true.

Exercises Desert Rock I, II, III, IV, and V in conjunction with the Buster-Jangle, Tumbler-Snapper, and Upshot-Knothole Nuclear Tests in Nevada, proved that electro-magnetic pulses from nuclear detonations had no effect on humans; blast overpressure and radiation (in that order) were the only immediate heath concerns. The subject personnel were within 6 miles from Dog shot in Operation Buster-Jangle (a 21kt shot.) Exercise Desert Rock V (during Operation Upshot-Knothole) moved personnel even closer, some almost to the minimum safe distance for blast and radiation.

These test showed that electronic equipment was especially vulnerable to EMP, and would initiate the production of several military specification detailing the necessary hardening requirements for electronic equipment so as to withstand nuclear EMP. Later tests would show that the integrated circuit mirco-chip (as found in quartz watches) was even more vulnerable.

Mechanical timing devices were not effected, and continued to perform properly. (Although, the main worry was mechanical time fuses for artillery shells. But then, a mechanical time fuse is nothing more than a very small, tough stop-watch.)

The US military still maintains the requirement for mechanical watches (MIL-PRF-46374, type 1, class 4 [6645-01-304-4308] and MIL-PRF-46374, type 2, class 4 [6645-00-066-4279]) for this very reason.

[Oh, any by the way, the original post was kinda' tongue-in-cheek.]
 

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I own a couple of quartz watches myself but I like others here would like to pass on my some of my (prized) collection to my kids. A mechanical/auto watch would probably last longer than a quartz.

I saw this thread on the Tag forum..

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Quote.1:
Originally Posted by Shane
Purchased a Tag for just under $1000.00 fifteen years ago. Sent it to Tag a month ago to have the battery replaced. TAG's response: they can not change the battery ~ they don't have the seals; so TAG essentially rendered my watch a usless piece of junk! After I telephoned the President of TAG here in the US, I was offered a chance an to purchase a new watch at 50% of the suggested retail price. I find this offer unacceptable. What TAG suggested as a resoultion for the battery change is, I spend another $1000 dollars and TAG will at no cost whatsoever to their company will sell me a new watch. To keep a loyal customer base, Tag should continue to change the battery on every expensive watch they sell or offer a replacement at no cost or a very minimal charge to the consumer. :-| :-s

Quote.2:
This is the exact reason, I swore to never own a quartz watch again. I had a Tag Formula 1 chrono and when the chronograph died, I sent it to Tag and was told the parts were no longer availabe.

They made me the same 50% offer but I took it. I then turned around and sold the watch on eBay and made pretty good on it. I took that money, put it towards my Sea-Dweller and never looked back.

The whole Tag experience left me with such a bad taste that for the longest time I swore I'd never buy a Tag again. I changed my mind once I became more educated about watches and realised that no matter who makes it, quartz watches are basically throw-away watches. It may take 20 or more so years for them to die but they will eventually will die.

I've now come back to Tag Heuer by purchasing the Super Professional and will likely buy an Aquagraph in the very near future. Of course they are both automatics as I still will never purchase a quartz watch ever again.


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End of Quote.2:
 

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Thanks for the post mikee. I didn't really think about it that way. (owning a quartz for a long period of time). Your example is one instance I have to agree with preferring a mechanical for. And I'll have to admit that if I was spending more than $1000 on any watch it would need to last for a long time and not be rendered useless because of parts. Can that not happen also to a mechanical, or is it just a lot less likely?
 

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A really good watch repairman (with the right equipment) can make almost any part in a mechanical watch. (Mono-metallic balances and their hairsprings possibly being the exception.) Pocket watch movements from the early twentieth century sometimes require this level of repair. But, it will cost at bit of money to have that kind of work done.

It would be possible to salvage parts to keep a quartz going for a long time (as is frequently done with mechanical movements.) Or, you can just hunt around for a new production quartz movement that fits. I think in the example quoted TAG just wanted more of his money for less of their trouble.
 

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I own a couple of quartz watches myself but I like others here would like to pass on my some of my (prized) collection to my kids. A mechanical/auto watch would probably last longer than a quartz.

I saw this thread on the Tag forum..

_____________________________________________________

Quote.1:
Originally Posted by Shane
Purchased a Tag for just under $1000.00 fifteen years ago. Sent it to Tag a month ago to have the battery replaced. TAG's response: they can not change the battery ~ they don't have the seals; so TAG essentially rendered my watch a usless piece of junk! After I telephoned the President of TAG here in the US, I was offered a chance an to purchase a new watch at 50% of the suggested retail price. I find this offer unacceptable. What TAG suggested as a resoultion for the battery change is, I spend another $1000 dollars and TAG will at no cost whatsoever to their company will sell me a new watch. To keep a loyal customer base, Tag should continue to change the battery on every expensive watch they sell or offer a replacement at no cost or a very minimal charge to the consumer. :-| :-s

Quote.2:
This is the exact reason, I swore to never own a quartz watch again. I had a Tag Formula 1 chrono and when the chronograph died, I sent it to Tag and was told the parts were no longer availabe.

They made me the same 50% offer but I took it. I then turned around and sold the watch on eBay and made pretty good on it. I took that money, put it towards my Sea-Dweller and never looked back.

The whole Tag experience left me with such a bad taste that for the longest time I swore I'd never buy a Tag again. I changed my mind once I became more educated about watches and realised that no matter who makes it, quartz watches are basically throw-away watches. It may take 20 or more so years for them to die but they will eventually will die.

I've now come back to Tag Heuer by purchasing the Super Professional and will likely buy an Aquagraph in the very near future. Of course they are both automatics as I still will never purchase a quartz watch ever again.


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End of Quote.2:

Interesting story about TAG. I have an old 6000 series Automatic Chronometer of theirs. I bought it ten years ago and had had it serviced once after about 5 years. Three years ago I managed to get some water in it while in a pool (my own fault as the crown wasn't screwed in properly). After speaking with TAG they asked that I flush it with fresh cold water and send it to them immediately. To my astonishment they came back to me after 1 month and told me they couldn't fix it, offering me 25% off a new watch of similar value as a trade in!. I took the watch back and it's been sitting in my drawer since.

I hate TAG.
 

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Interesting story about TAG. I have an old 6000 series Automatic Chronometer of theirs. I bought it ten years ago and had had it serviced once after about 5 years. Three years ago I managed to get some water in it while in a pool (my own fault as the crown wasn't screwed in properly). After speaking with TAG they asked that I flush it with fresh cold water and send it to them immediately. To my astonishment they came back to me after 1 month and told me they couldn't fix it, offering me 25% off a new watch of similar value as a trade in!. I took the watch back and it's been sitting in my drawer since.

I hate TAG.
That's just pure BS. Any automatic can be repaired. Take it to a qualified watchmaker and I am sure that it will be made operational in no time!
 

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This question, or one like it, is guaranteed to produce some serious controversy. Let me admit, from the start, that I am an accuracy freak and only quartz can supply the independent accuracy I want.
That doesn't mean I think less of mechanical watches. I think many of them are fascinating, that they show incredible workmanship and mechanical ingenuity, beautiful finish and attention to detail. The best of them will last for generations, given proper care and maintenance and, while they will never give accuracy measured in a few seconds a year, they will satisfy all the realistic needs of their owners with a few seconds a day.
But it's just not true that quartz watches won't last more than a few battery lives or that they can't be serviced for more than a few years. I have a twenty year old quartz watch that is being serviced by its manufacturer today and will be returned to me like new. The Citizen Chronomaster, a Japanese-market only model, gives its Japanese owners a 10 year warranty and Citizen undertakes to service the watch for as long as the original owner has it. So quartz watches CAN be serviced and can have long and useful lives.
The story in an answering post about a quartz Tag watch is not a condemnation of quartz, it's a condemnation of Tag Heuer. I'd be mad, too, but I'd vow never to buy another Tag Heuer, not that I wouldn't buy another quartz.
Different people have different priorities. I want the ultimate accuracy, a few seconds error in a year, 10 in 31,000,000 or three point two times 10 to the minus 7 (I can't get my computer to deliver that in numbers, sorry), and that's more important to me than the undoubted pleasures of the beautifully contrived and finished intricacies of mechanical watches. For many mechanical watch devotees, the accuracy I crave is unimportant. I can accept and respect their choice, but let's all accept that both choices are valid.
I'll choose my Grand Seiko, my thermocompensated Omega Double Eagle and my other electro-mechanical marvels and be delighted to see the mechanical watch devotees enjoy their tourbillons and beautiful intricacies.
 
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