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Plenty of videos on how to adjust a bracelet on YT.
If it's pin, you'll need a tool that'll allow you to push it out, as indicated by the arrows on the underside.
If it's screwed, you'll need a (or pair of) screwdriver of the same size as the slot – typically 1-1.3 mm.
Plenty of decent enough such screwdrivers on eBay, if you don't want to spend Bergeon money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Plenty of videos on how to adjust a bracelet on YT.
If it's pin, you'll need a tool that'll allow you to push it out, as indicated by the arrows on the underside.
If it's screwed, you'll need a (or pair of) screwdriver of the same size as the slot – typically 1-1.3 cm.
Plenty of decent enough such screwdrivers on eBay, if you don't want to spend Bergeon money.
Is this process the same even for Grand Seiko? Thought they had a different bracelet.
 

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Plenty of videos on how to adjust a bracelet on YT.
If it's pin, you'll need a tool that'll allow you to push it out, as indicated by the arrows on the underside.
If it's screwed, you'll need a (or pair of) screwdriver of the same size as the slot – typically 1-1.3 cm.
Plenty of decent enough such screwdrivers on eBay, if you don't want to spend Bergeon money.
THAT will take a big screwdriver!
 

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Grand Seiko use 2 screws (1 each side) with a pin in the middle. Plenty of loctite is also applied. To put it simply, its a pain
 

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Presumably if you know how to use a screwdriver, then you will figure out how to keep one side steady whilst unscrewing the opposite side.
It really doesn't require a video, but to spend a brief period of time looking at what's in front of you, and how to best hold it whilst undoing the opposite side's screw.
Honest to God, there's no rocket science involved, just using your eyes and your brain, in equal measure.

Not all GS have adopted the screw design, some still use the good old friction pin type, which the right tool and a pair of pliers will sort out.
If you must have your hand held, and some of us do, then there are videos, but not GS specific ones, since a screw is a screw, and a friction pin in a friction pin.
 

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I'm in the same situation trying to adjust my new GS bracelet. After spending "real money" I don't really trust the local jewelry shop to adjust it and prefer to do it myself. Just picked up a 4pc. set off of Esslinger site for not a lot of money. Is it really necessary to apply Loctite when re-installing the end screws? Also, can anyone confirm the screwdriver blade size for these GS bracelets.

This thread is sorely in need of some GS pics:
IMG_20140626_092703.jpg
IMG_20140626_094535.jpg
 

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It depends on the bracelet--divers and titanium Grand Seikos use friction pins, which in my opinion, are more annoying to work with. They're more of a blunt instrument.

Almost all Grand Seikos, however, use screwed links. GS' design is to use two screws, one on each side, with a pin floating in between them. So here's best practices:

You're going to want a nice clean area not over carpet. A table works well. If you drop one of the screws or pins on a messy table or the carpet, you may never find it again.

First, get a good screw driver made for this task. Then get some scotch tape. Tape all the way around the links and, since it's your first time, maybe some of the neighboring links. It's very easy for your screw driver to slip off and scratch the link, but if you've protected them preemptively, that's no longer a concern. When you've done it 10 or 20 times, you can gauge if your skill is sufficient to skip the masking stage, but start out with it and discard the training wheels later if you feel you have the dexterity.

Now, take your screw driver and push through the tape over the screw. Shouldn't take much to poke through. Apply a little pressure to get that first turn--they can be locked in a little tightly, so the first twist may need a slight amount of effort. After you unseat it, you can gently get it all the way out.

Take that screw (and the following parts) and immediately place it in a zip lock bag and lock the bag.

Turn the bracelet over and repeat the process for the screw on the other side.

Now you need to remove the pin. If you don't have the appropriate tool, you can apply some gentle knocks with your hand to one side to get the pin to come out the other and then pull it out. The direction it comes out is irrelevant.

If you do have the proper tool, or a really narrow pin, you can just push it out that way.

Here's some additional advice. Whenever possible, don't touch the links connected directly to the clasp (they share a screw with a link you can remove)--they are unique. If you botch the job and scratch them somehow, you'll have to live with it until you buy an expensive replacement. Since you will probably not need every link, unless you have a very large wrist, you'll have links to spare. By avoiding detaching the closest links to the clasp, if you screw up, you can just swap in your extra link instead and no one will ever know.

Anyway, the process is cheap and easy. Your first few times may be a little nerve racking as it's hard to work with such small components, especially on an expensive watch, but you'll get the hang of it in no time.
 

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Sorry for the mega-bump; Couldn't find a proper thread to post this!

Does anyone have experience, or could provide instructions, on how to size on the micro-adjustable clasps? I have a diver and would like to take it in two holes down on the micro-adjust, but didn't want to start poking them in forcibly, etc. without some proper instructions! Typically have my AD adjust sizing before buying, but this was a mail order...

EDIT: Anddddd I figured it out. Stuck a toothpick in to avoid damage, and it's indeed a pin, in case anyone was wondering about their GS sport watch...
 

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OP was great thanks, the tape idea is perfect! I put the screws/pins onto a piece of tape as well while working on things.
Now just pondering which link to remove as I need to get it tighter but right now its even in terms of link counts on either side...
 
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