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. . . most of my watches are mechanicals, so I'm used to the concept of daily inaccuracy of my timepieces. I've also gotten used to checking my watches against the atomic clock website to see how they are doing. Not compulsively, but once in a while.

I picked up a Citizen Eco Drive last week off Ebay from a trusted seller. It's BM 8180 -03E, a military field model that I got a great price on. Threw on a black leather strap and it looks like a million bucks.

Anyway, after charging it up and doing the reset, I set it against the navy clock to see just how accurate these things are.

The result is that it's dead on after a couple of days. I expected that. The weird thing is that I've caught it leaping ahead by a couple of seconds for a minute or so, catch up, fall behind by a couple of seconds after a few minutes, catch up. The end result is that it's dead bang on over the long term, but it has periods where it seems to jump around a by a couple of seconds either way. Always evens out though. I'm not getting the "staggered second hand" like you get when its undercharged (At least I haven't noticed it). I do wear long sleeves though, so maybe it's still undercharged and catches up when exposed to light.

I admit, I've haven't timed quartzes the same way I've timed mechanicals. Never needed to. I just thought this was interesting behavior.

Has anybody else noticed this? Or do I have way too much time on my hands?
 

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I only started being concerned with accuracy after getting into mechanical watches. I wore Zodiac quartz's for many years and never checked them as they were usually dead on. All of my mechanicals do vary a few sec. per day except for my Aeromatic and Amphibia which are way off. Anyways since setting/checking my watches with time.gov I have noticed my Seiko Kinetic is not accurate. Never have noticed it trying to catch up though.
 

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All my Eco-Drives are slightly fast. Even my Seiko Solar and Seiko mini 7c43 are a little fast. The Doxa Aquaman is a bit slow after a battery change but I don't think I sync'd it properly. The most accurate are the cheapest watches I own. A Casio analog chrono and a quartz Triumph Motorcycle branded tank watch that is within 15 seconds after six months. Go figure.
 

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. . . most of my watches are mechanicals, so I'm used to the concept of daily inaccuracy of my timepieces. I've also gotten used to checking my watches against the atomic clock website to see how they are doing. Not compulsively, but once in a while.

I picked up a Citizen Eco Drive last week off Ebay from a trusted seller. It's BM 8180 -03E, a military field model that I got a great price on. Threw on a black leather strap and it looks like a million bucks.

Anyway, after charging it up and doing the reset, I set it against the navy clock to see just how accurate these things are.



The result is that it's dead on after a couple of days. I expected that. The weird thing is that I've caught it leaping ahead by a couple of seconds for a minute or so, catch up, fall behind by a couple of seconds after a few minutes, catch up. The end result is that it's dead bang on over the long term, but it has periods where it seems to jump around a by a couple of seconds either way. Always evens out though. I'm not getting the "staggered second hand" like you get when its undercharged (At least I haven't noticed it). I do wear long sleeves though, so maybe it's still undercharged and catches up when exposed to light.

I admit, I've haven't timed quartzes the same way I've timed mechanicals. Never needed to. I just thought this was interesting behavior.

Has anybody else noticed this? Or do I have way too much time on my hands?


I think you've hit the nail on the head and your long sleeves are depriving the light sensor of its transfusion of light, so the display nods off, popping to the surface when you pull your cuff back. I be that, if you fold your cuff back so that the watch is out in the open, it'll stop dancing about.

I'm sure you're well aware of this, but just in case.... the eco-drive part of the watch has nothing to do with its accuracy. It's a normal, conventional quartz movement that happens to be powered by a battery (or maybe a condenser) that is recharged by the energy extracted from the light that falls on the sensor. I don't know of any high accuracy eco-drive movements, thermo-compensated or otherwise. I know there are some light-powered, radio-controlled watches..... in fact, I've got one, I forget the model number but it's a Japanese market Seiko.

I've been looking for the first Grand Seiko light powered or radio-controlled model, but so far none has showed up. It seems inevitable eventually......
 

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I think you've hit the nail on the head and your long sleeves are depriving the light sensor of its transfusion of light, so the display nods off, popping to the surface when you pull your cuff back. I be that, if you fold your cuff back so that the watch is out in the open, it'll stop dancing about.

I'm sure you're well aware of this, but just in case.... the eco-drive part of the watch has nothing to do with its accuracy. It's a normal, conventional quartz movement that happens to be powered by a battery (or maybe a condenser) that is recharged by the energy extracted from the light that falls on the sensor. I don't know of any high accuracy eco-drive movements, thermo-compensated or otherwise. I know there are some light-powered, radio-controlled watches..... in fact, I've got one, I forget the model number but it's a Japanese market Seiko.

I've been looking for the first Grand Seiko light powered or radio-controlled model, but so far none has showed up. It seems inevitable eventually......
there are and have been in fact a few HEQ ecodrives in Citizens Exceed line in the JDM @ +/- 10sec/yr spec
 
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